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Title: SU-E-I-51: Quantitative Assessment of X-Ray Imaging Detector Performance in a Clinical Setting - a Simple Approach Using a Commercial Instrument

Abstract

Purpose: To measure and compare the performance of X-ray imaging detectors in a clinical setting using a dedicated instrument for the quantitative determination of detector performance. Methods: The DQEPro (DQE Instruments Inc., London, Ontario Canada) was used to determine the MTF, NPS and DQE using an IEC compliant methodology for three different imaging modalities: conventional radiography (CsI-based detector), general-purpose radioscopy (CsI-based detector), and mammography (a-Se based detector). The radiation qualities (IEC) RQA-5 and RQA-M-2 were used for the CsI-based and a-Se-based detectors, respectively. The DQEPro alleviates some of the difficulties associated with DQE measurements by automatically positioning test devices over the detector, guiding the user through the image acquisition process and providing software for calculations. Results: A comparison of the NPS showed that the image noise of the a-Se detector was less correlated than the CsI detectors. A consistently higher performance was observed for the a-Se detector at all spatial frequencies (MTF: 0.97@0.25 cy/mm, DQE: 0.72@0.25 cy/mm) and the DQE drops off slower than for the CsI detectors. The CsI detector used for conventional radiography displayed a higher performance at low spatial frequencies compared to the CsI detector used for radioscopy (DQE: 0.65 vs 0.60@0.25 cy/mm). However, at spatial frequenciesmore » above 1.3 cy/mm, the radioscopy detector displayed better performance than the conventional radiography detector (DQE: 0.35 vs 0.24@2.00 cy/mm). Conclusion: The difference in the MTF, NPS and DQE that was observed for the two different CsI detectors and the a-Se detector reflect the imaging tasks that the different detector types are intended for. The DQEPro has made the determination and calculation of quantitative metrics of X-ray imaging detector performance substantially more convenient and accessible to undertake in a clinical setting.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Karolinska University Hospital, Solna (Sweden)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22494004
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTER CODES; IMAGES; MAMMARY GLANDS; METRICS; NOISE; RADIATION QUALITY

Citation Formats

Sjoeberg, J, Bujila, R, Omar, A, Nowik, P, Mobini-Kesheh, S, and Lindstroem, J. SU-E-I-51: Quantitative Assessment of X-Ray Imaging Detector Performance in a Clinical Setting - a Simple Approach Using a Commercial Instrument. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924048.
Sjoeberg, J, Bujila, R, Omar, A, Nowik, P, Mobini-Kesheh, S, & Lindstroem, J. SU-E-I-51: Quantitative Assessment of X-Ray Imaging Detector Performance in a Clinical Setting - a Simple Approach Using a Commercial Instrument. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924048.
Sjoeberg, J, Bujila, R, Omar, A, Nowik, P, Mobini-Kesheh, S, and Lindstroem, J. Mon . "SU-E-I-51: Quantitative Assessment of X-Ray Imaging Detector Performance in a Clinical Setting - a Simple Approach Using a Commercial Instrument". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924048.
@article{osti_22494004,
title = {SU-E-I-51: Quantitative Assessment of X-Ray Imaging Detector Performance in a Clinical Setting - a Simple Approach Using a Commercial Instrument},
author = {Sjoeberg, J and Bujila, R and Omar, A and Nowik, P and Mobini-Kesheh, S and Lindstroem, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To measure and compare the performance of X-ray imaging detectors in a clinical setting using a dedicated instrument for the quantitative determination of detector performance. Methods: The DQEPro (DQE Instruments Inc., London, Ontario Canada) was used to determine the MTF, NPS and DQE using an IEC compliant methodology for three different imaging modalities: conventional radiography (CsI-based detector), general-purpose radioscopy (CsI-based detector), and mammography (a-Se based detector). The radiation qualities (IEC) RQA-5 and RQA-M-2 were used for the CsI-based and a-Se-based detectors, respectively. The DQEPro alleviates some of the difficulties associated with DQE measurements by automatically positioning test devices over the detector, guiding the user through the image acquisition process and providing software for calculations. Results: A comparison of the NPS showed that the image noise of the a-Se detector was less correlated than the CsI detectors. A consistently higher performance was observed for the a-Se detector at all spatial frequencies (MTF: 0.97@0.25 cy/mm, DQE: 0.72@0.25 cy/mm) and the DQE drops off slower than for the CsI detectors. The CsI detector used for conventional radiography displayed a higher performance at low spatial frequencies compared to the CsI detector used for radioscopy (DQE: 0.65 vs 0.60@0.25 cy/mm). However, at spatial frequencies above 1.3 cy/mm, the radioscopy detector displayed better performance than the conventional radiography detector (DQE: 0.35 vs 0.24@2.00 cy/mm). Conclusion: The difference in the MTF, NPS and DQE that was observed for the two different CsI detectors and the a-Se detector reflect the imaging tasks that the different detector types are intended for. The DQEPro has made the determination and calculation of quantitative metrics of X-ray imaging detector performance substantially more convenient and accessible to undertake in a clinical setting.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924048},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: To investigate the potential utility of in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI) technique with synchrotron radiation in detecting early hepatocellular carcinoma and cavernous hemangioma of live using in vitro model system. Methods: Without contrast agents, three typical early hepatocellular carcinoma specimens and three typical cavernous hemangioma of live specimens were imaged using ILPCI. To quantitatively discriminate early hepatocellular carcinoma tissues and cavernous hemangioma tissues, the projection images texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) were extracted. The texture parameters of energy, inertia, entropy, correlation, sum average, sum entropy, difference average, difference entropy and inverse difference moment, were obtained respectively.more » Results: In the ILPCI planar images of early hepatocellular carcinoma specimens, vessel trees were clearly visualized on the micrometer scale. Obvious distortion deformation was presented, and the vessel mostly appeared as a ‘dry stick’. Liver textures appeared not regularly. In the ILPCI planar images of cavernous hemangioma of live specimens, typical vessels had not been found compared with the early hepatocellular carcinoma planar images. The planar images of cavernous hemangioma of live specimens clearly displayed the dilated hepatic sinusoids with the diameter of less than 100 microns, but all of them were overlapped with each other. The texture parameters of energy, inertia, entropy, correlation, sum average, sum entropy, and difference average, showed a statistically significant between the two types specimens image (P<0.01), except the texture parameters of difference entropy and inverse difference moment(P>0.01). Conclusion: The results indicate that there are obvious changes in morphological levels including vessel structures and liver textures. The study proves that this imaging technique has a potential value in evaluating early hepatocellular carcinoma and cavernous hemangioma of live.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate quantitatively dose distributions from helical, axial and cone-beam CT clinical imaging techniques by measurement using a two-dimensional (2D) diode-array detector. Methods: 2D-dose distributions from selected clinical protocols used for axial, helical and cone-beam CT imaging were measured using a diode-array detector (MapCheck2). The MapCheck2 is composed from solid state diode detectors that are arranged in horizontal and vertical lines with a spacing of 10 mm. A GE-Light-Speed CT-simulator was used to acquire axial and helical CT images and a kV on-board-imager integrated with a Varian TrueBeam-STx machine was used to acquire cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Results: Themore » dose distributions from axial, helical and cone-beam CT were non-uniform over the region-of-interest with strong spatial and angular dependence. In axial CT, a large dose gradient was measured that decreased from lateral sides to the middle of the phantom due to large superficial dose at the side of the phantom in comparison with larger beam attenuation at the center. The dose decreased at the superior and inferior regions in comparison to the center of the phantom in axial CT. An asymmetry was found between the right-left or superior-inferior sides of the phantom which possibly to angular dependence in the dose distributions. The dose level and distribution varied from one imaging technique into another. For the pelvis technique, axial CT deposited a mean dose of 3.67 cGy, helical CT deposited a mean dose of 1.59 cGy, and CBCT deposited a mean dose of 1.62 cGy. Conclusions: MapCheck2 provides a robust tool to measure directly 2D-dose distributions for CT imaging with high spatial resolution detectors in comparison with ionization chamber that provides a single point measurement or an average dose to the phantom. The dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 consider medium heterogeneity and can represent specific patient dose.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the relative task-specific performance of two x-ray imaging detectors including the effect of other components of the imaging chain. Methods: The relative object detectability (ROD) was defined as the ratio of the integral of the detective-quantum efficiency (DQE) of a detector weighted by the square of the Fourier Transform (or frequency spectrum) of the object to the same integral for a second detector. The generalized ROD (G-ROD) is calculated by replacing DQE by the generalized DQE (GDQE) which includes geometric unsharpness and scatter to evaluate the total imaging chain. The G-ROD was calculated for the micro-angiographic fluoroscopemore » (MAF) relative to a flat-panel detector (FPD) for low (1.05) and high (1.2) magnifications with two focal-spot sizes, small (0.3 mm) and medium (0.5 mm), and for the same value of scatter fraction. Solid spheres from 50 to 600 microns were simulated as the objects for this evaluation. The G-ROD results were compared with those of the ROD which considers the detectors alone. Results: For 50-micron spheres, the ROD is 7.93 and, for the small [medium] focus, the G-ROD is 6.74 [5.22] at low magnification and 3.03 [1.66] at high magnification, indicating superior performance of the MAF particularly at low magnification. Both ROD and G-ROD decrease monotonically with size and remain around one above 400-microns. The G-ROD decreases more dramatically with low compared to high magnification for both focal spots. Conclusion: In all cases, the MAF performs better than the FPD and the decreasing trend of the G-ROD indicates that the performance of both detectors becomes similar as the object size increases and becomes nearly equal above 400-micron diameter sphere size. Finally, increased magnification and focal-spot size decrease the G-ROD, indicting that they degrade the performance of the MAF more than that of the FPD for a small-object viewing task. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.« less
  • Purpose: To study breathing related tumor motion amplitudes by lung lobe location under controlled breathing conditions used in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for NSCLC. Methods: Sixty-five NSCLC SBRT patients since 2009 were investigated. Patients were categorized based on tumor anatomic location (RUL-17, RML-7, RLL-18, LUL-14, LLL-9). A 16-slice CT scanner [GE RT16 Pro] along with Varian Realtime Position Management (RPM) software was used to acquire the 4DCT data set using 1.25 mm slice width. Images were binned in 10 phases, T00 being at maximum inspiration ' T50 at maximum expiration phase. Tumor volume was segmented in T50 using themore » CT-lung window and its displacement were measured from phase to phase in all three axes; superiorinferior, anterior-posterior ' medial-lateral at the centroid level of the tumor. Results: The median tumor movement in each lobe was as follows: RUL= 3.8±2.0 mm (mean ITV: 9.5 cm{sup 3}), RML= 4.7±2.8 mm (mean ITV: 9.2 cm{sup 3}), RLL=6.6±2.6 mm (mean ITV: 12.3 cm{sup 3}), LUL=3.8±2.4 mm (mean ITV: 18.5 cm{sup 3}), ' LLL=4.7±2.5 mm (mean ITV: 11.9 cm{sup 3}). The median respiratory cycle for all patients was found to be 3.81 ± 1.08 seconds [minimum 2.50 seconds, maximum 7.07 seconds]. The tumor mobility incorporating breathing cycle was RUL = 0.95±0.49 mm/s, RML = 1.35±0.62 mm/s, RLL = 1.83±0.71 mm/s, LUL = 0.98 ±0.50 mm/s, and LLL = 1.15 ±0.53 mm/s. Conclusion: Our results show that tumor displacement is location dependent. The range of motion and mobility increases as the location of the tumor nears the diaphragm. Under abdominal compression, the magnitude of tumor motion is reduced by as much as a factor of 2 in comparison to reported tumor magnitudes under conventional free breathing conditions. This study demonstrates the utility of abdominal compression in reducing the tumor motion leading to reduced ITV and planning tumor volumes (PTV)« less
  • Purpose: Commonly used radiopharmaceuticals were tested to define the most important dosimetric factors in preclinical studies. Dosimetric calculations were applied in two different whole-body mouse models, with varying organ size, so as to determine their impact on absorbed doses and S-values. Organ mass influence was evaluated with computational models and Monte Carlo(MC) simulations. Methods: MC simulations were executed on GATE to determine dose distribution in the 4D digital MOBY mouse phantom. Two mouse models, 28 and 34 g respectively, were constructed based on realistic preclinical exams to calculate the absorbed doses and S-values of five commonly used radionuclides in SPECT/PETmore » studies (18F, 68Ga, 177Lu, 111In and 99mTc).Radionuclide biodistributions were obtained from literature. Realistic statistics (uncertainty lower than 4.5%) were acquired using the standard physical model in Geant4. Comparisons of the dosimetric calculations on the two different phantoms for each radiopharmaceutical are presented. Results: Dose per organ in mGy was calculated for all radiopharmaceuticals. The two models introduced a difference of 0.69% in their brain masses, while the largest differences were observed in the marrow 18.98% and in the thyroid 18.65% masses.Furthermore, S-values of the most important target-organs were calculated for each isotope. Source-organ was selected to be the whole mouse body.Differences on the S-factors were observed in the 6.0–30.0% range. Tables with all the calculations as reference dosimetric data were developed. Conclusion: Accurate dose per organ and the most appropriate S-values are derived for specific preclinical studies. The impact of the mouse model size is rather high (up to 30% for a 17.65% difference in the total mass), and thus accurate definition of the organ mass is a crucial parameter for self-absorbed S values calculation.Our goal is to extent the study for accurate estimations in small animal imaging, whereas it is known that there is a large variety in the anatomy of the organs.« less