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Title: SU-E-I-17: Evaluation of Commercially Available Extension Plates for the ACR CT Accreditation Phantom

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the impact of commercially available extension plates on Hounsfield Unit (HU) values in the ACR CT accreditation phantom (Model 464, Gammex Inc., Middleton, Wi). The extension plates are intended to improve water HU values in scanners where the traditional solution involves scanning the phantom with an adjacent water or CTDI phantom. Methods: The Model 464 phantom was scanned on 9 different CT scanners at 8 separate sites representing 16 and 64 slice MDCT technology from four CT manufacturers. The phantom was scanned with and without the extension plates (Gammex 464 EXTPLT-KIT) in helical and axial modes. A water phantom was also scanned to verify water HU calibration. Technique was 120 kV tube potential, 350 mAs, and 210 mm display field of view. Slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm were based on site clinical protocols. The widest available beam collimation was used. Regions of interest were drawn on the HU test objects in Module 1 of the phantom and mean values recorded. Results: For all axial mode scans, water HU values were within limits with or without the extension plates. For two scanners (both Lightspeed VCT, GE Medical Systems, Waukesha WI), axial mode bone HU values were above themore » specified range both with and without the extension plates though they were closer to the specified range with the plates installed. In helical scan mode, two scanners (both GE Lightspeed VCT) had water HU values above the specified range without the plates installed. With the plates installed, the water HU values were within range for all scanners in all scan modes. Conclusion: Using the plates, the Lightspeed VCT scanners passed the water HU test when scanning in helical mode. The benefit of the extension plates was evident in helical mode scanning with GE scanners using a nominal 4 cm beam. Disclosure: The extension plates evaluated in this work were provided free of charge to the authors. The authors have no other financial interest in Gammex Inc.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. SUNY Upstate Medical Univ, Syracuse, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22493977
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALGORITHMS; CALIBRATION; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; PHANTOMS; SKELETON

Citation Formats

Greene-Donnelly, K, and Ogden, K. SU-E-I-17: Evaluation of Commercially Available Extension Plates for the ACR CT Accreditation Phantom. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924014.
Greene-Donnelly, K, & Ogden, K. SU-E-I-17: Evaluation of Commercially Available Extension Plates for the ACR CT Accreditation Phantom. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924014.
Greene-Donnelly, K, and Ogden, K. Mon . "SU-E-I-17: Evaluation of Commercially Available Extension Plates for the ACR CT Accreditation Phantom". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924014.
@article{osti_22493977,
title = {SU-E-I-17: Evaluation of Commercially Available Extension Plates for the ACR CT Accreditation Phantom},
author = {Greene-Donnelly, K and Ogden, K},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate the impact of commercially available extension plates on Hounsfield Unit (HU) values in the ACR CT accreditation phantom (Model 464, Gammex Inc., Middleton, Wi). The extension plates are intended to improve water HU values in scanners where the traditional solution involves scanning the phantom with an adjacent water or CTDI phantom. Methods: The Model 464 phantom was scanned on 9 different CT scanners at 8 separate sites representing 16 and 64 slice MDCT technology from four CT manufacturers. The phantom was scanned with and without the extension plates (Gammex 464 EXTPLT-KIT) in helical and axial modes. A water phantom was also scanned to verify water HU calibration. Technique was 120 kV tube potential, 350 mAs, and 210 mm display field of view. Slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm were based on site clinical protocols. The widest available beam collimation was used. Regions of interest were drawn on the HU test objects in Module 1 of the phantom and mean values recorded. Results: For all axial mode scans, water HU values were within limits with or without the extension plates. For two scanners (both Lightspeed VCT, GE Medical Systems, Waukesha WI), axial mode bone HU values were above the specified range both with and without the extension plates though they were closer to the specified range with the plates installed. In helical scan mode, two scanners (both GE Lightspeed VCT) had water HU values above the specified range without the plates installed. With the plates installed, the water HU values were within range for all scanners in all scan modes. Conclusion: Using the plates, the Lightspeed VCT scanners passed the water HU test when scanning in helical mode. The benefit of the extension plates was evident in helical mode scanning with GE scanners using a nominal 4 cm beam. Disclosure: The extension plates evaluated in this work were provided free of charge to the authors. The authors have no other financial interest in Gammex Inc.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924014},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: In this study, two commercially available programs were compared for the evaluation of delivered daily dose using cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: Thirty (n=30) patients previously treated in our clinic (10 prostate, 10 SBRT lung and 10 abdomen) were used in this study. The patients' plans were optimized and calculated using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. The daily CBCT scans were imported into Velocity and RayStation along with the corresponding planning CTs, structure sets and 3D dose distributions for each patient. The organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on each CBCT by the prescribing physician and were included inmore » the evaluation of the daily delivered dose. Each CBCT was registered to the planning CT, once with rigid registration and then again, separately, with deformable registration. After registering each CBCT, the dose distribution from the planning CT was overlaid and the dose volume histograms (DVH) for the OAR and the planning target volumes (PTV) were calculated. Results: For prostate patients, we observed daily volume changes for the OARs. The DVH analysis for those patients showed variation in the sparing of the OARs while PTV coverage remained virtually unchanged using both Velocity and RayStation systems. Similar results were observed for abdominal patients. In contrast, for SBRT lung patients, the DVH for the OARs and target were comparable to those from the initial treatment plan. Differences in organ volume and organ doses were also observed when comparing the daily fractions using deformable and rigid registrations. Conclusion: By using daily CBCT dose reconstruction, we proved PTV coverage for prostate and abdominal targets is adequate. However, there is significant dosimetric change for the OARs. For lung SBRT patients, the delivered daily dose for both PTV and OAR is comparable to the planned dose with no significant differences.« less
  • Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reedmore » National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 mGy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.« less
  • Purpose: To compare and analyze two novel algorithms for the assessment of modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of computed tomography (CT) systems using a simple acrylic cylindrical phantom Method and Materials: Images of the acrylic cylindrical phantom were acquired by a GE LightSpeed 16 RT (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) using 120 kVp, 330 mA, 2.5 mm slice thickness, 10 cm field-of view (FOV), four reconstruction kernels (e.g. standard, soft, detail, bone, and lung). Two different algorithms were used to analyze images for MTF assessment. First, Richard et al. suggested a task-based MTF assessment method through an edge spread function (ESF) whichmore » described pixel intensities as a function of distance from the center. The MTF was obtained as the absolute value of Fourier transform of the differentiated ESF. Second, Ohkubo et al. devised an effective method to determine the point spread function (PSF) of CT system accompanied with verification. The line spread function (LSF), which was the one-dimensional integration of the PSF, was used to obtain the MTF. We validated the reliability of two above-mentioned methods through the comparison with a conventional method using a thin tungsten wire phantom. Results: The measured MTFs by two methods were mostly similar each other for standard, soft, and detail kernels. In 0.6 lp/mm, the MTF difference between two methods were 0.012(standard), 0.004(soft), and 0.037(detail). They also coincided with the MTF by the conventional method well. However, there were considerable distinctions for bone and lung kernels containing edge enhancement that might cause undershoots near the peak of the LSF. Conclusions: We compared two novel methods to assess task-based MTFs for clinical CT systems especially using a simple acrylic cylindrical phantom with high-convenience and low-cost, and validated them against a conventional method. This work can provide a practical solution to users for the quality assurance of CT.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop and use a novel phantom to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of the Leskell Gamma Plan convolution-based dose calculation algorithm compared with the current TMR10 algorithm. Methods: A novel phantom was designed to fit the Leskell Gamma Knife G Frame which could accommodate various materials in the form of one inch diameter, cylindrical plugs. The plugs were split axially to allow EBT2 film placement. Film measurements were made during two experiments. The first utilized plans generated on a homogeneous acrylic phantom setup using the TMR10 algorithm, with various materials inserted intomore » the phantom during film irradiation to assess the effect on delivered dose due to unplanned heterogeneities upstream in the beam path. The second experiment utilized plans made on CT scans of different heterogeneous setups, with one plan using the TMR10 dose calculation algorithm and the second using the convolution-based algorithm. Materials used to introduce heterogeneities included air, LDPE, polystyrene, Delrin, Teflon, and aluminum. Results: The data shows that, as would be expected, having heterogeneities in the beam path does induce dose delivery error when using the TMR10 algorithm, with the largest errors being due to the heterogeneities with electron densities most different from that of water, i.e. air, Teflon, and aluminum. Additionally, the Convolution algorithm did account for the heterogeneous material and provided a more accurate predicted dose, in extreme cases up to a 7–12% improvement over the TMR10 algorithm. The convolution algorithm expected dose was accurate to within 3% in all cases. Conclusion: This study proves that the convolution algorithm is an improvement over the TMR10 algorithm when heterogeneities are present. More work is needed to determine what the heterogeneity size/volume limits are where this improvement exists, and in what clinical and/or research cases this would be relevant.« less
  • Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, 80 mA, 0.7s rotation time. Image quality was assessed by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document.more » NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: For the baseline protocol, CNR was found to decrease from 0.460 ± 0.182 to 0.420 ± 0.057 when kVa was activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.620 ± 0.040. The liver dose decreased by 30% with kVa activation. Conclusion: Application of kVa reduces the liver dose up to 30%. However, reduction in image quality for abdominal scans occurs when using the automated tube voltage selection feature at the baseline protocol. As demonstrated by the CNR and NPS analysis, the texture and magnitude of the noise in reconstructed images at ASiR 40% was found to be the same as our baseline images. We have demonstrated that 30% dose reduction is possible when using 40% ASiR with kVa in pediatric patients.« less