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Title: SU-E-I-12: Flexible Geometry Computed Tomography

Abstract

Purpose: The concept separates the mechanical connection between the radiation source and detector. This design allows the trajectory and orientation of the radiation source/detector to be customized to the object that is being imaged. This is in contrast to the formulaic rotation-translation image acquisition of conventional computed tomography(CT).Background/significance:CT devices that image a full range of: anatomy, patient populations, and imaging procedures are large. The root cause of the expanding size of comprehensive CT is due to the commitment to helical geometry that is hardwired into the image reconstruction. FGCT extends the application of alternative reconstruction techniques, i.e. tomosynthesis, by separating the two main components— radiation source and detector— and allow for 6 degrees of freedom motion for radiation source, detector, or both. The image acquisition geometry is then tailored to how the patient/object is positioned. This provides greater flexibility on the position and location that the patient/object is being imaged. Additionally, removing the need of a rotating gantry reduces the footprint so that CT is more mobile and more available to move to where the patient/object is at, instead of the other way around. Methods: As proof-of-principle, a reconstruction algorithm is designed to produce FGCT images. Using simulated detector data,more » voxels intersecting a line drawn between the radiation source and an individual detector are traced and modified using the detector signal. The detector signal is modified to compensate for changes in the source to detector distance. Adjacent voxels are modified in proportion to the detector signal, providing a simple image filter. Results: Image-quality from the proposed FGCT reconstruction technique is proving to be a challenge, producing hardily recognizable images from limited projections angles. Conclusion: Preliminary assessment of the reconstruction technique demonstrates the inevitable tradeoff of producing meaningful image-quality verses the practicality of how to obtain sufficient image data.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. East Lansing, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22493973
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALGORITHMS; ANATOMY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; FLEXIBILITY; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGES; PATIENTS; RADIATION SOURCES

Citation Formats

Shaw, R. SU-E-I-12: Flexible Geometry Computed Tomography. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924009.
Shaw, R. SU-E-I-12: Flexible Geometry Computed Tomography. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924009.
Shaw, R. Mon . "SU-E-I-12: Flexible Geometry Computed Tomography". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924009.
@article{osti_22493973,
title = {SU-E-I-12: Flexible Geometry Computed Tomography},
author = {Shaw, R},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The concept separates the mechanical connection between the radiation source and detector. This design allows the trajectory and orientation of the radiation source/detector to be customized to the object that is being imaged. This is in contrast to the formulaic rotation-translation image acquisition of conventional computed tomography(CT).Background/significance:CT devices that image a full range of: anatomy, patient populations, and imaging procedures are large. The root cause of the expanding size of comprehensive CT is due to the commitment to helical geometry that is hardwired into the image reconstruction. FGCT extends the application of alternative reconstruction techniques, i.e. tomosynthesis, by separating the two main components— radiation source and detector— and allow for 6 degrees of freedom motion for radiation source, detector, or both. The image acquisition geometry is then tailored to how the patient/object is positioned. This provides greater flexibility on the position and location that the patient/object is being imaged. Additionally, removing the need of a rotating gantry reduces the footprint so that CT is more mobile and more available to move to where the patient/object is at, instead of the other way around. Methods: As proof-of-principle, a reconstruction algorithm is designed to produce FGCT images. Using simulated detector data, voxels intersecting a line drawn between the radiation source and an individual detector are traced and modified using the detector signal. The detector signal is modified to compensate for changes in the source to detector distance. Adjacent voxels are modified in proportion to the detector signal, providing a simple image filter. Results: Image-quality from the proposed FGCT reconstruction technique is proving to be a challenge, producing hardily recognizable images from limited projections angles. Conclusion: Preliminary assessment of the reconstruction technique demonstrates the inevitable tradeoff of producing meaningful image-quality verses the practicality of how to obtain sufficient image data.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924009},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: Multi-frequency EIT has been reported to be a potential tool in distinguishing a tissue anomaly from background. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of acquiring functional information by comparing multi-frequency EIT images in reference to the structural information from the CT image through fusion. Methods: EIT data was acquired from a slice of winter melon using sixteen electrodes around the phantom, injecting a current of 0.4mA at 100, 66, 24.8 and 9.9 kHz. Differential EIT images were generated by considering different combinations of pair frequencies, one serving as reference data and the other as test data. The experimentmore » was repeated after creating an anomaly in the form of an off-centered cavity of diameter 4.5 cm inside the melon. All EIT images were reconstructed using Electrical Impedance Tomography and Diffuse Optical Tomography Reconstruction Software (EIDORS) package in 2-D differential imaging mode using one-step Gaussian Newton minimization solver. CT image of the melon was obtained using a Phillips CT Scanner. A segmented binary mask image was generated based on the reference electrode position and the CT image to define the regions of interest. The region selected by the user was fused with the CT image through logical indexing. Results: Differential images based on the reference and test signal frequencies were reconstructed from EIT data. Result illustrated distinct structural inhomogeneity in seeded region compared to fruit flesh. The seeded region was seen as a higherimpedance region if the test frequency was lower than the base frequency in the differential EIT reconstruction. When the test frequency was higher than the base frequency, the signal experienced less electrical impedance in the seeded region during the EIT data acquisition. Conclusion: Frequency-based differential EIT imaging can be explored to provide additional functional information along with structural information from CT for identifying different tissues.« less
  • Purpose: ImpactMC (CT Imaging, Erlangen, Germany) is a Monte Carlo (MC) software package that offers a GPU enabled, user definable and validated method for 3D dose distribution calculations for radiography and Computed Tomography (CT). ImpactMC, in and of itself, offers limited capabilities to perform batch simulations. The aim of this work was to develop a framework for the batch simulation of absorbed organ dose distributions from CT scans of computational voxel phantoms. Methods: The ICRP 110 adult Reference Male and Reference Female computational voxel phantoms were formatted into compatible input volumes for MC simulations. A Matlab (The MathWorks Inc., Natick,more » MA) script was written to loop through a user defined set of simulation parameters and 1) generate input files required for the simulation, 2) start the MC simulation, 3) segment the absorbed dose for organs in the simulated dose volume and 4) transfer the organ doses to a database. A demonstration of the framework is made where the glandular breast dose to the adult Reference Female phantom, for a typical Chest CT examination, is investigated. Results: A batch of 48 contiguous simulations was performed with variations in the total collimation and spiral pitch. The demonstration of the framework showed that the glandular dose to the right and left breast will vary depending on the start angle of rotation, total collimation and spiral pitch. Conclusion: The developed framework provides a robust and efficient approach to performing a large number of user defined MC simulations with computational voxel phantoms in CT (minimal user interaction). The resulting organ doses from each simulation can be accessed through a database which greatly increases the ease of analyzing the resulting organ doses. The framework developed in this work provides a valuable resource when investigating different dose optimization strategies in CT.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate organ doses from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. Methods: A Philips Brilliance CT scanner (64 slice) was simulated using the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) based on the EGSnrc user code. The X-ray spectra and a bowtie filter for MC simulations were determined to coincide with measurements of half-value layer (HVL) and off-center ratio (OCR) profile in air. The MC dose was calibrated from absorbed dose measurements using a Farmer chamber and a cylindrical water phantom. The dose distribution from CT was calculated using patient CT images and organ doses were evaluated from dose volume histograms.more » Results: The HVLs of Al at 80, 100, and 120 kV were 6.3, 7.7, and 8.7 mm, respectively. The calculated HVLs agreed with measurements within 0.3%. The calculated and measured OCR profiles agreed within 3%. For adult head scans (CTDIvol) =51.4 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 23.2, 34.2, and 37.6 mGy, respectively. For pediatric head scans (CTDIvol =35.6 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 19.3, 24.5, and 26.8 mGy, respectively. For adult chest scans (CTDIvol=19.0 mGy), mean doses for lung, heart, and spinal cord were 21.1, 22.0, and 15.5 mGy, respectively. For adult abdominal scans (CTDIvol=14.4 mGy), the mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 17.4, 16.5, 16.8, 16.8, and 13.1 mGy, respectively. For pediatric abdominal scans (CTDIvol=6.76 mGy), mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 8.24, 8.90, 8.17, 8.31, and 6.73 mGy, respectively. In head scan, organ doses were considerably different from CTDIvol values. Conclusion: MC dose distributions calculated by using patient CT images are useful to evaluate organ doses absorbed to individual patients.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the accuracy and feasibility of dose calculations using kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography in cervical cancer radiotherapy using a correction algorithm. Methods: The Hounsfield units (HU) and electron density (HU-density) curve was obtained for both planning CT (pCT) and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) using a CIRS-062 calibration phantom. The pCT and kV-CBCT images have different HU values, and if the HU-density curve of CBCT was directly used to calculate dose in CBCT images may have a deviation on dose distribution. It is necessary to normalize the different HU values between pCT and CBCT. A HU correctionmore » algorithm was used for CBCT images (cCBCT). Fifteen intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans of cervical cancer were chosen, and the plans were transferred to the pCT and cCBCT data sets without any changes for dose calculations. Phantom and patient studies were carried out. The dose differences and dose distributions were compared between cCBCT plan and pCT plan. Results: The HU number of CBCT was measured by several times, and the maximum change was less than 2%. To compare with pCT, the CBCT and cCBCT has a discrepancy, the dose differences in CBCT and cCBCT images were 2.48%±0.65% (range: 1.3%∼3.8%) and 0.48%±0.21% (range: 0.1%∼0.82%) for phantom study, respectively. For dose calculation in patient images, the dose differences were 2.25%±0.43% (range: 1.4%∼3.4%) and 0.63%±0.35% (range: 0.13%∼0.97%), respectively. And for the dose distributions, the passing rate of cCBCT was higher than the CBCTs. Conclusion: The CBCT image for dose calculation is feasible in cervical cancer radiotherapy, and the correction algorithm offers acceptable accuracy. It will become a useful tool for adaptive radiation therapy.« less
  • Purpose: A new commercially available metal artifact reduction (MAR) software in computed tomography (CT) imaging was evaluated with phantoms in the presence of metals. The goal was to assess the ability of the software to restore the CT number in the vicinity of the metals without impacting the image quality. Methods: A Catphan 504 was scanned with a GE Optima RT 580 CT scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) and the images were reconstructed with and without the MAR software. Both datasets were analyzed with Image Owl QA software (Image Owl Inc, Greenwich, NY). CT number sensitometry, MTF, low contrast, uniformity,more » noise and spatial accuracy were compared for scans with and without MAR software. In addition, an in-house made phantom was scanned with and without a stainless steel insert at three different locations. The accuracy of the CT number and metal insert dimension were investigated as well. Results: Comparisons between scans with and without MAR algorithm on the Catphan phantom demonstrate similar results for image quality. However, noise was slightly higher for the MAR algorithm. Evaluation of the CT number at various locations of the in-house made phantom was also performed. The baseline HU, obtained from the scan without metal insert, was compared to scans with the stainless steel insert at 3 different locations. The HU difference between the baseline scan versus metal scan was improved when the MAR algorithm was applied. In addition, the physical diameter of the stainless steel rod was over-estimated by the MAR algorithm by 0.9 mm. Conclusion: This work indicates with the presence of metal in CT scans, the MAR algorithm is capable of providing a more accurate CT number without compromising the overall image quality. Future work will include the dosimetric impact on the MAR algorithm.« less