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Title: Nanocluster ionization energies and work function of aluminum, and their temperature dependence

Abstract

Ionization threshold energies of Al{sub n} (n = 32-95) nanoclusters are determined by laser ionization of free neutral metal clusters thermalized to several temperatures in the range from 65 K to 230 K. The photoion yield curves of cold clusters follow a quadratic energy dependence above threshold, in agreement with the Fowler law of surface photoemission. Accurate data collection and analysis procedures make it possible to resolve very small (few parts in a thousand) temperature-induced shifts in the ionization energies. Extrapolation of the data to the bulk limit enables a determination of the thermal shift of the polycrystalline metal work function, found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical prediction based on the influence of thermal expansion. Small clusters display somewhat larger thermal shifts, reflecting their greater susceptibility to thermal expansion. Ionization studies of free size-resolved nanoclusters facilitate understanding of the interplay of surface, electronic, and lattice properties under contamination-free conditions.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22493162
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Chemical Physics; Journal Volume: 143; Journal Issue: 16; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; ALUMINIUM; CONTAMINATION; ENERGY DEPENDENCE; EXTRAPOLATION; IONIZATION; NANOSTRUCTURES; PHOTOEMISSION; POLYCRYSTALS; SURFACES; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; THERMAL EXPANSION; THRESHOLD ENERGY; WORK FUNCTIONS

Citation Formats

Halder, Avik, and Kresin, Vitaly V. Nanocluster ionization energies and work function of aluminum, and their temperature dependence. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4934761.
Halder, Avik, & Kresin, Vitaly V. Nanocluster ionization energies and work function of aluminum, and their temperature dependence. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4934761.
Halder, Avik, and Kresin, Vitaly V. 2015. "Nanocluster ionization energies and work function of aluminum, and their temperature dependence". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4934761.
@article{osti_22493162,
title = {Nanocluster ionization energies and work function of aluminum, and their temperature dependence},
author = {Halder, Avik and Kresin, Vitaly V.},
abstractNote = {Ionization threshold energies of Al{sub n} (n = 32-95) nanoclusters are determined by laser ionization of free neutral metal clusters thermalized to several temperatures in the range from 65 K to 230 K. The photoion yield curves of cold clusters follow a quadratic energy dependence above threshold, in agreement with the Fowler law of surface photoemission. Accurate data collection and analysis procedures make it possible to resolve very small (few parts in a thousand) temperature-induced shifts in the ionization energies. Extrapolation of the data to the bulk limit enables a determination of the thermal shift of the polycrystalline metal work function, found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical prediction based on the influence of thermal expansion. Small clusters display somewhat larger thermal shifts, reflecting their greater susceptibility to thermal expansion. Ionization studies of free size-resolved nanoclusters facilitate understanding of the interplay of surface, electronic, and lattice properties under contamination-free conditions.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4934761},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 16,
volume = 143,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month =
}
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