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Title: Thermal stability of deep level defects induced by high energy proton irradiation in n-type GaN

Abstract

The impact of annealing of proton irradiation-induced defects in n-type GaN devices has been systematically investigated using deep level transient and optical spectroscopies. Moderate temperature annealing (>200–250 °C) causes significant reduction in the concentration of nearly all irradiation-induced traps. While the decreased concentration of previously identified N and Ga vacancy related levels at E{sub C} − 0.13 eV, 0.16 eV, and 2.50 eV generally followed a first-order reaction model with activation energies matching theoretical values for N{sub I} and V{sub Ga} diffusion, irradiation-induced traps at E{sub C} − 0.72 eV, 1.25 eV, and 3.28 eV all decrease in concentration in a gradual manner, suggesting a more complex reduction mechanism. Slight increases in concentration are observed for the N-vacancy related levels at E{sub C} − 0.20 eV and 0.25 eV, which may be due to the reconfiguration of other N-vacancy related defects. Finally, the observed reduction in concentrations of the states at E{sub C} − 1.25 and E{sub C} − 3.28 eV as a function of annealing temperature closely tracks the detailed recovery behavior of the background carrier concentration as a function of annealing temperature. As a result, it is suggested that these two levels are likely to be responsible for the underlying carrier compensation effect that causes the observation of carrier removal in proton-irradiated n-GaN.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]; ; ; ;  [2]; ; ;  [3]
  1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)
  2. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)
  3. Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22492836
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 118; Journal Issue: 15; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ANNEALING; EV RANGE 01-10; GALLIUM NITRIDES; IRRADIATION; PROTONS; SPECTROSCOPY; VACANCIES

Citation Formats

Zhang, Z., Farzana, E., Sun, W. Y., Arehart, A. R., Ringel, S. A., E-mail: ringel.5@osu.edu, Chen, J., Zhang, E. X., Fleetwood, D. M., Schrimpf, R. D., McSkimming, B., Kyle, E. C. H., and Speck, J. S. Thermal stability of deep level defects induced by high energy proton irradiation in n-type GaN. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4933174.
Zhang, Z., Farzana, E., Sun, W. Y., Arehart, A. R., Ringel, S. A., E-mail: ringel.5@osu.edu, Chen, J., Zhang, E. X., Fleetwood, D. M., Schrimpf, R. D., McSkimming, B., Kyle, E. C. H., & Speck, J. S. Thermal stability of deep level defects induced by high energy proton irradiation in n-type GaN. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4933174.
Zhang, Z., Farzana, E., Sun, W. Y., Arehart, A. R., Ringel, S. A., E-mail: ringel.5@osu.edu, Chen, J., Zhang, E. X., Fleetwood, D. M., Schrimpf, R. D., McSkimming, B., Kyle, E. C. H., and Speck, J. S. 2015. "Thermal stability of deep level defects induced by high energy proton irradiation in n-type GaN". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4933174.
@article{osti_22492836,
title = {Thermal stability of deep level defects induced by high energy proton irradiation in n-type GaN},
author = {Zhang, Z. and Farzana, E. and Sun, W. Y. and Arehart, A. R. and Ringel, S. A., E-mail: ringel.5@osu.edu and Chen, J. and Zhang, E. X. and Fleetwood, D. M. and Schrimpf, R. D. and McSkimming, B. and Kyle, E. C. H. and Speck, J. S.},
abstractNote = {The impact of annealing of proton irradiation-induced defects in n-type GaN devices has been systematically investigated using deep level transient and optical spectroscopies. Moderate temperature annealing (>200–250 °C) causes significant reduction in the concentration of nearly all irradiation-induced traps. While the decreased concentration of previously identified N and Ga vacancy related levels at E{sub C} − 0.13 eV, 0.16 eV, and 2.50 eV generally followed a first-order reaction model with activation energies matching theoretical values for N{sub I} and V{sub Ga} diffusion, irradiation-induced traps at E{sub C} − 0.72 eV, 1.25 eV, and 3.28 eV all decrease in concentration in a gradual manner, suggesting a more complex reduction mechanism. Slight increases in concentration are observed for the N-vacancy related levels at E{sub C} − 0.20 eV and 0.25 eV, which may be due to the reconfiguration of other N-vacancy related defects. Finally, the observed reduction in concentrations of the states at E{sub C} − 1.25 and E{sub C} − 3.28 eV as a function of annealing temperature closely tracks the detailed recovery behavior of the background carrier concentration as a function of annealing temperature. As a result, it is suggested that these two levels are likely to be responsible for the underlying carrier compensation effect that causes the observation of carrier removal in proton-irradiated n-GaN.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4933174},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 15,
volume = 118,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month =
}
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