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Title: Influence of substrate microcrystallinity on the orientation of laser-induced periodic surface structures

Abstract

The research in this paper deals with the angular dependence of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) by linearly polarized nanosecond laser pulses on polycrystalline austenitic stainless steel. Incident angles ranging from 45° to 70° lead to the generation of superimposed merely perpendicular oriented LIPSS on steel as well as on monocrystalline (100) silicon which was used as a reference material. Additional extraordinary orientations of superimposing LIPSS along with significantly different periodicities are found on polycrystalline steel but not on (100) silicon. Electron backscatter diffraction measurements indicate that the expansion of these LIPSS is limited to the grain size and affected by the crystal orientation of the individual grains. Atomic force microscopy imaging shows that LIPSS fringe heights are in good agreement with the theoretically predicted penetration depths of surface plasmon polaritons into stainless steel. These results indicate that optical anisotropies must be taken into account to fully describe the theory of light-matter interaction leading to LIPSS formation.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. Department of Chemistry, Philipps-University Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Straße 4, 35032 Marburg (Germany)
  2. Department of Physical-Chemistry, Justus-Liebig-University Gießen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 58, 35392 Gießen (Germany)
  3. (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22492778
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 118; Journal Issue: 13; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ACCIDENTS; ANISOTROPY; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; AUSTENITIC STEELS; DIFFRACTION; GRAIN SIZE; LASERS; ORIENTATION; PENETRATION DEPTH; PERIODICITY; POLARONS; POLYCRYSTALS; SILICON; STAINLESS STEELS; SUBSTRATES; SURFACES

Citation Formats

Nürnberger, P., Reinhardt, H., Kim, H-C., Yang, F., Peppler, K., Janek, J., Hampp, N., and Materials Science Center, 35032 Marburg. Influence of substrate microcrystallinity on the orientation of laser-induced periodic surface structures. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4932215.
Nürnberger, P., Reinhardt, H., Kim, H-C., Yang, F., Peppler, K., Janek, J., Hampp, N., & Materials Science Center, 35032 Marburg. Influence of substrate microcrystallinity on the orientation of laser-induced periodic surface structures. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4932215.
Nürnberger, P., Reinhardt, H., Kim, H-C., Yang, F., Peppler, K., Janek, J., Hampp, N., and Materials Science Center, 35032 Marburg. Wed . "Influence of substrate microcrystallinity on the orientation of laser-induced periodic surface structures". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4932215.
@article{osti_22492778,
title = {Influence of substrate microcrystallinity on the orientation of laser-induced periodic surface structures},
author = {Nürnberger, P. and Reinhardt, H. and Kim, H-C. and Yang, F. and Peppler, K. and Janek, J. and Hampp, N. and Materials Science Center, 35032 Marburg},
abstractNote = {The research in this paper deals with the angular dependence of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) by linearly polarized nanosecond laser pulses on polycrystalline austenitic stainless steel. Incident angles ranging from 45° to 70° lead to the generation of superimposed merely perpendicular oriented LIPSS on steel as well as on monocrystalline (100) silicon which was used as a reference material. Additional extraordinary orientations of superimposing LIPSS along with significantly different periodicities are found on polycrystalline steel but not on (100) silicon. Electron backscatter diffraction measurements indicate that the expansion of these LIPSS is limited to the grain size and affected by the crystal orientation of the individual grains. Atomic force microscopy imaging shows that LIPSS fringe heights are in good agreement with the theoretically predicted penetration depths of surface plasmon polaritons into stainless steel. These results indicate that optical anisotropies must be taken into account to fully describe the theory of light-matter interaction leading to LIPSS formation.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4932215},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 13,
volume = 118,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Oct 07 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Wed Oct 07 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • The influence of crystal orientation on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) has been investigated on a polycrystalline nickel sample. Electron Backscatter Diffraction characterization has been exploited to provide structural information within the laser spot on irradiated samples to determine the dependence of LIPSS formation and lattice defects (stacking faults, twins, dislocations) upon the crystal orientation. Significant differences are observed at low-to-medium number of laser pulses, outstandingly for (111)-oriented surface which favors lattice defects formation rather than LIPSS formation.
  • Abstract not provided.
  • The formation of nearly wavelength-sized laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) on single-crystalline silicon upon irradiation with single or multiple femtosecond-laser pulses (pulse duration tau=130 fs and central wavelength lambda=800 nm) in air is studied experimentally and theoretically. In our theoretical approach, we model the LIPSS formation by combining the generally accepted first-principles theory of Sipe and co-workers with a Drude model in order to account for transient intrapulse changes in the optical properties of the material due to the excitation of a dense electron-hole plasma. Our results are capable to explain quantitatively the spatial periods of the LIPSSs being somewhatmore » smaller than the laser wavelength, their orientation perpendicular to the laser beam polarization, and their characteristic fluence dependence. Moreover, evidence is presented that surface plasmon polaritons play a dominant role during the initial stage of near-wavelength-sized periodic surface structures in femtosecond-laser irradiated silicon, and it is demonstrated that these LIPSSs can be formed in silicon upon irradiation by single femtosecond-laser pulses.« less
  • Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were formed on Cu/Si or Cu/glass thin films using Nd:YAG laser beam (40 ps, 10 Hz, and 30 mJ/cm{sup 2}). The study of ablation threshold is always achieved over melting when the variation of the number of pulses increases from 1 to 1000. But the incubation effect is leading to reduce the threshold of melting as increasing the number of laser pulse. Also, real time reflectivity signals exhibit typical behavior to stress the formation of a liquid phase during the laser-processing regime and helps to determine the threshold of soft ablation. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses have shownmore » the topology of the micro-crater containing regular spikes with different height. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allows finally to show three distinguished zones in the close region of isolated protrusions. The central zone is a typical crystallized area of few nanometers surrounded by a mixed poly-crystalline and amorphous area. Finally, in the region far from the protrusion zone, Cu film shows an amorphous structure. The real time reflectivity, AFM, and HR-TEM analyses evidence the formation of a liquid phase during the LIPSS formation in the picosecond regime.« less
  • We report on the formation of laser-induced periodic annular surface structures on fused silica irradiated with multiple femtosecond laser pulses. This surface morphology emerges after the disappearance of the conventional laser induced periodic surface structures, under successive laser pulse irradiation. It is independent of the laser polarization and universally observed for different focusing geometries. We interpret its formation in terms of the interference between the reflected laser field on the surface of the damage crater and the incident laser pulse.