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Title: Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

Abstract

In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons trailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC 20375-5346 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22490943
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 22; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 U.S. Government; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; BETATRONS; ELECTRONS; OSCILLATIONS; PHOTON EMISSION; PHOTONS; PLASMA; PLASMA SIMULATION; WAKEFIELD ACCELERATORS; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Palastro, J. P., Kaganovich, D., and Gordon, D. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4923018.
Palastro, J. P., Kaganovich, D., & Gordon, D. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4923018.
Palastro, J. P., Kaganovich, D., and Gordon, D. Mon . "Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4923018.
@article{osti_22490943,
title = {Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields},
author = {Palastro, J. P. and Kaganovich, D. and Gordon, D.},
abstractNote = {In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons trailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4923018},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 6,
volume = 22,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
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