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Title: Neutrinos and dark matter

Abstract

Neutrinos could be key particles to unravel the nature of the dark matter of the Universe. On the one hand, sterile neutrinos in minimal extensions of the Standard Model are excellent dark matter candidates, producing potentially observable signals in the form of a line in the X-ray sky. On the other hand, the annihilation or the decay of dark matter particles produces, in many plausible dark matter scenarios, a neutrino flux that could be detected at neutrino telescopes, thus providing non-gravitational evidence for dark matter. More conservatively, the non-observation of a significant excess in the neutrino fluxes with respect to the expected astrophysical backgrounds can be used to constrain dark matter properties, such as the self-annihilation cross section, the scattering cross section with nucleons and the lifetime.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Physik-Department T30d, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße, 85748 Garching (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22490664
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1666; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: Neutrino 2014: 26. international conference on neutrino physics and astrophysics, Boston, MA (United States), 2-7 Jun 2014; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ANNIHILATION; ASTROPHYSICS; CROSS SECTIONS; LIFETIME; NEUTRINOS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; NUCLEONS; PARTICLE DECAY; POTENTIALS; SCATTERING; STANDARD MODEL; UNIVERSE; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Ibarra, Alejandro. Neutrinos and dark matter. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4915588.
Ibarra, Alejandro. Neutrinos and dark matter. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4915588.
Ibarra, Alejandro. 2015. "Neutrinos and dark matter". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4915588.
@article{osti_22490664,
title = {Neutrinos and dark matter},
author = {Ibarra, Alejandro},
abstractNote = {Neutrinos could be key particles to unravel the nature of the dark matter of the Universe. On the one hand, sterile neutrinos in minimal extensions of the Standard Model are excellent dark matter candidates, producing potentially observable signals in the form of a line in the X-ray sky. On the other hand, the annihilation or the decay of dark matter particles produces, in many plausible dark matter scenarios, a neutrino flux that could be detected at neutrino telescopes, thus providing non-gravitational evidence for dark matter. More conservatively, the non-observation of a significant excess in the neutrino fluxes with respect to the expected astrophysical backgrounds can be used to constrain dark matter properties, such as the self-annihilation cross section, the scattering cross section with nucleons and the lifetime.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4915588},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1666,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 7
}
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