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Title: Analysis of heterogeneous water vapor uptake by metal iodide cluster ions via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry

Abstract

The sorption of vapor molecules onto pre-existing nanometer sized clusters is of importance in understanding particle formation and growth in gas phase environments and devising gas phase separation schemes. Here, we apply a differential mobility analyzer-mass spectrometer based approach to observe directly the sorption of vapor molecules onto iodide cluster ions of the form (MI){sub x}M{sup +} (x = 1-13, M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs) in air at 300 K and with water saturation ratios in the 0.01-0.64 range. The extent of vapor sorption is quantified in measurements by the shift in collision cross section (CCS) for each ion. We find that CCS measurements are sensitive enough to detect the transient binding of several vapor molecules to clusters, which shift CCSs by only several percent. At the same time, for the highest saturation ratios examined, we observed CCS shifts of up to 45%. For x < 4, cesium, rubidium, and potassium iodide cluster ions are found to uptake water to a similar extent, while sodium iodide clusters uptake less water. For x ≥ 4, sodium iodide cluster ions uptake proportionally more water vapor than rubidium and potassium iodide cluster ions, while cesium iodide ions exhibit less uptake. Measuredmore » CCS shifts are compared to predictions based upon a Kelvin-Thomson-Raoult (KTR) model as well as a Langmuir adsorption model. We find that the Langmuir adsorption model can be fit well to measurements. Meanwhile, KTR predictions deviate from measurements, which suggests that the earliest stages of vapor uptake by nanometer scale species are not well described by the KTR model.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22489565
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Chemical Physics; Journal Volume: 143; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ADSORPTION; CESIUM; CESIUM IODIDES; COLLISIONS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CROSS SECTIONS; ION PAIRS; IONS; MASS SPECTROMETERS; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; MOLECULES; POTASSIUM IODIDES; RUBIDIUM; SODIUM IODIDES; UPTAKE; WATER; WATER VAPOR

Citation Formats

Oberreit, Derek, Fluid Measurement Technologies, Inc., Saint Paul, Minnesota 55110, Rawat, Vivek K., Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos, Ouyang, Hui, McMurry, Peter H., and Hogan, Christopher J., E-mail: hogan108@umn.edu. Analysis of heterogeneous water vapor uptake by metal iodide cluster ions via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4930278.
Oberreit, Derek, Fluid Measurement Technologies, Inc., Saint Paul, Minnesota 55110, Rawat, Vivek K., Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos, Ouyang, Hui, McMurry, Peter H., & Hogan, Christopher J., E-mail: hogan108@umn.edu. Analysis of heterogeneous water vapor uptake by metal iodide cluster ions via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4930278.
Oberreit, Derek, Fluid Measurement Technologies, Inc., Saint Paul, Minnesota 55110, Rawat, Vivek K., Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos, Ouyang, Hui, McMurry, Peter H., and Hogan, Christopher J., E-mail: hogan108@umn.edu. 2015. "Analysis of heterogeneous water vapor uptake by metal iodide cluster ions via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4930278.
@article{osti_22489565,
title = {Analysis of heterogeneous water vapor uptake by metal iodide cluster ions via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry},
author = {Oberreit, Derek and Fluid Measurement Technologies, Inc., Saint Paul, Minnesota 55110 and Rawat, Vivek K. and Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos and Ouyang, Hui and McMurry, Peter H. and Hogan, Christopher J., E-mail: hogan108@umn.edu},
abstractNote = {The sorption of vapor molecules onto pre-existing nanometer sized clusters is of importance in understanding particle formation and growth in gas phase environments and devising gas phase separation schemes. Here, we apply a differential mobility analyzer-mass spectrometer based approach to observe directly the sorption of vapor molecules onto iodide cluster ions of the form (MI){sub x}M{sup +} (x = 1-13, M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs) in air at 300 K and with water saturation ratios in the 0.01-0.64 range. The extent of vapor sorption is quantified in measurements by the shift in collision cross section (CCS) for each ion. We find that CCS measurements are sensitive enough to detect the transient binding of several vapor molecules to clusters, which shift CCSs by only several percent. At the same time, for the highest saturation ratios examined, we observed CCS shifts of up to 45%. For x < 4, cesium, rubidium, and potassium iodide cluster ions are found to uptake water to a similar extent, while sodium iodide clusters uptake less water. For x ≥ 4, sodium iodide cluster ions uptake proportionally more water vapor than rubidium and potassium iodide cluster ions, while cesium iodide ions exhibit less uptake. Measured CCS shifts are compared to predictions based upon a Kelvin-Thomson-Raoult (KTR) model as well as a Langmuir adsorption model. We find that the Langmuir adsorption model can be fit well to measurements. Meanwhile, KTR predictions deviate from measurements, which suggests that the earliest stages of vapor uptake by nanometer scale species are not well described by the KTR model.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4930278},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 10,
volume = 143,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 9
}
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