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Title: Dark energy and dark matter from primordial QGP

Abstract

Coloured relics servived after hadronization might have given birth to dark matter and dark energy. Theoretical ideas to solve mystery of cosmic acceleration, its origin and its status with reference to recent past are of much interest and are being proposed by many workers. In the present paper, we present a critical review of work done to understand the earliest appearance of dark matter and dark energy in the scenario of primordial quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase after Big Bang.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University Ujjain (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22488673
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1670; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: EIPT-2015: International conference on emerging interfaces of plasma science and technology, Ujjain (India), 9-10 Mar 2015; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCELERATION; INFLATIONARY UNIVERSE; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; ORIGIN; QUARK MATTER; REVIEWS

Citation Formats

Vaidya, Vaishali, E-mail: vaidvavaishali24@gmail.com, and Upadhyaya, G. K., E-mail: gopalujiain@yahoo.co.in. Dark energy and dark matter from primordial QGP. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4926720.
Vaidya, Vaishali, E-mail: vaidvavaishali24@gmail.com, & Upadhyaya, G. K., E-mail: gopalujiain@yahoo.co.in. Dark energy and dark matter from primordial QGP. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4926720.
Vaidya, Vaishali, E-mail: vaidvavaishali24@gmail.com, and Upadhyaya, G. K., E-mail: gopalujiain@yahoo.co.in. 2015. "Dark energy and dark matter from primordial QGP". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4926720.
@article{osti_22488673,
title = {Dark energy and dark matter from primordial QGP},
author = {Vaidya, Vaishali, E-mail: vaidvavaishali24@gmail.com and Upadhyaya, G. K., E-mail: gopalujiain@yahoo.co.in},
abstractNote = {Coloured relics servived after hadronization might have given birth to dark matter and dark energy. Theoretical ideas to solve mystery of cosmic acceleration, its origin and its status with reference to recent past are of much interest and are being proposed by many workers. In the present paper, we present a critical review of work done to understand the earliest appearance of dark matter and dark energy in the scenario of primordial quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase after Big Bang.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4926720},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1670,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 7
}
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