skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-C-BRD-05: Non-Invasive in Vivo Biodosimetry in Radiotherapy Patients Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Spectroscopy

Abstract

Purpose: Medical intervention following a major, unplanned radiation event can elevate the human whole body exposure LD50 from 3 to 7 Gy. On a large scale, intervention cannot be achieved effectively without accurate and efficient triage. Current methods of retrospective biodosimetry are restricted in capability and applicability; published human data is limited. We aim to further develop, validate, and optimize an automated field-deployable in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) instrument that can fill this need. Methods: Ionizing radiation creates highly-stable, carbonate-based free radicals within tooth enamel. Using a process similar to nuclear magnetic resonance, EPR directly measures the presence of radiation-induced free radicals. We performed baseline EPR measurements on one of the upper central incisors of total body irradiation (TBI) and head and neck (H&N) radiotherapy patients before their first treatment. Additional measurements were performed between subsequent fractions to examine the EPR response with increasing radiation dose. Independent dosimetry measurements were performed with optically-stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) and diodes to more accurately establish the relationship between EPR signal and delivered radiation dose. Results: 36 EPR measurements were performed over the course of four months on two TBI and four H & N radiotherapy patients. We observe a linear increase inmore » EPR signal with increasing dose across the entirety of the tested range. A linear least squares-weighted fit of delivered dose versus measured signal amplitude yields an adjusted R-square of 0.966. The standard error of inverse prediction (SEIP) is 1.77 Gy. For doses up to 7 Gy, the range most relevant to triage, we calculate an SEIP of 1.29 Gy. Conclusion: EPR spectroscopy provides a promising method of retrospective, non-invasive, in vivo biodosimetry. Our preliminary data show an excellent correlation between predicted signal amplitude and delivered dose. With further development, a robust means of predicting delivered radiation dose from EPR measurements is expected. This project was funded by the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services subcontracted through the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and by the Dartmouth Physically-Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR) Pilot Program.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)
  2. Geisel Medical School at Dartmouth University, Hanover, New Hampshire (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22486546
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; DOSEMETERS; ELECTRON SPIN RESONANCE; ENAMELS; HEAD; IN VIVO; LEAST SQUARE FIT; LUMINESCENCE; NECK; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SPECTROSCOPY; WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION

Citation Formats

Bahar, N, Roberts, K, Stabile, F, Mongillo, N, Decker, RD, Wilson, LD, Husain, Z, Contessa, J, Carlson, DJ, Williams, BB, Flood, AB, and Swartz, HM. SU-C-BRD-05: Non-Invasive in Vivo Biodosimetry in Radiotherapy Patients Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Spectroscopy. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4923800.
Bahar, N, Roberts, K, Stabile, F, Mongillo, N, Decker, RD, Wilson, LD, Husain, Z, Contessa, J, Carlson, DJ, Williams, BB, Flood, AB, & Swartz, HM. SU-C-BRD-05: Non-Invasive in Vivo Biodosimetry in Radiotherapy Patients Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Spectroscopy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4923800.
Bahar, N, Roberts, K, Stabile, F, Mongillo, N, Decker, RD, Wilson, LD, Husain, Z, Contessa, J, Carlson, DJ, Williams, BB, Flood, AB, and Swartz, HM. 2015. "SU-C-BRD-05: Non-Invasive in Vivo Biodosimetry in Radiotherapy Patients Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Spectroscopy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4923800.
@article{osti_22486546,
title = {SU-C-BRD-05: Non-Invasive in Vivo Biodosimetry in Radiotherapy Patients Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Spectroscopy},
author = {Bahar, N and Roberts, K and Stabile, F and Mongillo, N and Decker, RD and Wilson, LD and Husain, Z and Contessa, J and Carlson, DJ and Williams, BB and Flood, AB and Swartz, HM},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Medical intervention following a major, unplanned radiation event can elevate the human whole body exposure LD50 from 3 to 7 Gy. On a large scale, intervention cannot be achieved effectively without accurate and efficient triage. Current methods of retrospective biodosimetry are restricted in capability and applicability; published human data is limited. We aim to further develop, validate, and optimize an automated field-deployable in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) instrument that can fill this need. Methods: Ionizing radiation creates highly-stable, carbonate-based free radicals within tooth enamel. Using a process similar to nuclear magnetic resonance, EPR directly measures the presence of radiation-induced free radicals. We performed baseline EPR measurements on one of the upper central incisors of total body irradiation (TBI) and head and neck (H&N) radiotherapy patients before their first treatment. Additional measurements were performed between subsequent fractions to examine the EPR response with increasing radiation dose. Independent dosimetry measurements were performed with optically-stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) and diodes to more accurately establish the relationship between EPR signal and delivered radiation dose. Results: 36 EPR measurements were performed over the course of four months on two TBI and four H & N radiotherapy patients. We observe a linear increase in EPR signal with increasing dose across the entirety of the tested range. A linear least squares-weighted fit of delivered dose versus measured signal amplitude yields an adjusted R-square of 0.966. The standard error of inverse prediction (SEIP) is 1.77 Gy. For doses up to 7 Gy, the range most relevant to triage, we calculate an SEIP of 1.29 Gy. Conclusion: EPR spectroscopy provides a promising method of retrospective, non-invasive, in vivo biodosimetry. Our preliminary data show an excellent correlation between predicted signal amplitude and delivered dose. With further development, a robust means of predicting delivered radiation dose from EPR measurements is expected. This project was funded by the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services subcontracted through the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and by the Dartmouth Physically-Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR) Pilot Program.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4923800},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to detect the non-neoplastic white-matter changes vs. time after irradiation using {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in vivo. Methods and Materials: A total of 394 {sup 1}H MR spectra were acquired from 100 patients (age 19-74 years; mean and median age, 43 years) before and during 2 years after radiation therapy (the mean absorbed doses calculated for the averaged spectroscopy voxels are similar and close to 20 Gy). Results: Ocilations were observed in choline-containing compounds (Cho)/creatine and phosphocreatine (Cr), Cho/N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and center of gravity (CG) of the lipid band inmore » the range of 0.7-1.5 ppm changes over time reveal oscillations. The parameters have the same 8-month cycle period; however the CG changes precede the other by 2 months. Conclusions: The results indicate the oscillative nature of the brain response to irradiation, which may be caused by the blood-brain barrier disruption and repair processes. These oscillations may influence the NMR results, depending on the cycle phase in which the NMR measurements are performed in. The earliest manifestation of radiation injury detected by magnetic resonance spectroscopy is the CG shift.« less
  • The use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate oscillatory processes in an electron plasma is reported. (AIP)
  • Undoped and aluminum (Al) doped magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) samples were synthesized using a high-temperature solid-state synthesis method. The microscopic defect structures of Al-doped MgB{sub 2} samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance. It was found that Mg-vacancies are responsible for defect-induced peculiarities in MgB{sub 2}. Above a certain level of Al doping, enhanced conductive properties of MgB{sub 2} disappear due to filling of vacancies or trapping of Al in Mg-related vacancy sites.
  • The reactor accident at Chernobyl in 1986 necessitated a massive environmental cleanup that involved over 600,000 workers from all 15 Republics of the former Soviet Union. To determine whether the whole-body radiation received by workers in the course of these decontamination activities resulted in a detectable biological response, over 1,500 blood samples were obtained from cleanup workers sent from two Baltic countries, Estonia and Latvia. Here we report the results of studies of biodosimetry using the glycophorin A (GPA) locus in vivo somatic cell mutation assay applied to 734 blood samples from these workers, to 51 control samples from unexposedmore » Baltic populations and to 94 samples from historical U.S. controls. The data reveal inconsistent evidence that the protracted radiation exposures received by these workers resulted in a significant dose-associated increase in GPA locus mutations compared with the controls. Taken together, these data suggest that the average radiation exposure to these workers does not greatly exceed 10 cGy, the minimum levels at which radiation effects might be detectable by the assay. Although the protracted nature of the exposure may have reduced the efficiency of induction of GPA locus mutations, it is likely that the estimated physical doses for these cleanup worker populations (median reported dose 9.5 cGy) were too low to result in radiation damage to erythroid stem cells that can be detected reliably by this method. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.« less