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Title: A lab-based ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer with exchangeable analysis chambers

Abstract

Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) is a powerful spectroscopy tool that is inherently surface sensitive, elemental, and chemical specific, with the ability to probe sample surfaces under Torr level pressures. Herein, we describe the design of a new lab-based APXPS system with the ability to swap small volume analysis chambers. Ag 3d(5/2) analyses of a silver foil were carried out at room temperature to determine the optimal sample-to-aperture distance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis spot size, relative peak intensities, and peak full width at half maximum of three different electrostatic lens modes: acceleration, transmission, and angular. Ag 3d(5/2) peak areas, differential pumping pressures, and pump performance were assessed under varying N{sub 2}(g) analysis chamber pressures up to 20 Torr. The commissioning of this instrument allows for the investigation of molecular level interfacial processes under ambient vapor conditions in energy and environmental research.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)
  2. Scienta AB, Box 15120, 750 15 Uppsala (Sweden)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22482761
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 86; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ACCELERATION; APERTURES; COMMISSIONING; DESIGN; ELECTROSTATIC LENSES; PEAKS; PERFORMANCE; PUMPING; PUMPS; SILVER; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; VAPORS; X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Newberg, John T., E-mail: jnewberg@udel.edu, Arble, Chris, Goodwin, Chris, Khalifa, Yehia, Broderick, Alicia, and Åhlund, John. A lab-based ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer with exchangeable analysis chambers. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4928498.
Newberg, John T., E-mail: jnewberg@udel.edu, Arble, Chris, Goodwin, Chris, Khalifa, Yehia, Broderick, Alicia, & Åhlund, John. A lab-based ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer with exchangeable analysis chambers. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4928498.
Newberg, John T., E-mail: jnewberg@udel.edu, Arble, Chris, Goodwin, Chris, Khalifa, Yehia, Broderick, Alicia, and Åhlund, John. Sat . "A lab-based ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer with exchangeable analysis chambers". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4928498.
@article{osti_22482761,
title = {A lab-based ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer with exchangeable analysis chambers},
author = {Newberg, John T., E-mail: jnewberg@udel.edu and Arble, Chris and Goodwin, Chris and Khalifa, Yehia and Broderick, Alicia and Åhlund, John},
abstractNote = {Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) is a powerful spectroscopy tool that is inherently surface sensitive, elemental, and chemical specific, with the ability to probe sample surfaces under Torr level pressures. Herein, we describe the design of a new lab-based APXPS system with the ability to swap small volume analysis chambers. Ag 3d(5/2) analyses of a silver foil were carried out at room temperature to determine the optimal sample-to-aperture distance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis spot size, relative peak intensities, and peak full width at half maximum of three different electrostatic lens modes: acceleration, transmission, and angular. Ag 3d(5/2) peak areas, differential pumping pressures, and pump performance were assessed under varying N{sub 2}(g) analysis chamber pressures up to 20 Torr. The commissioning of this instrument allows for the investigation of molecular level interfacial processes under ambient vapor conditions in energy and environmental research.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4928498},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 8,
volume = 86,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Sat Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
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