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Title: A 1.5 T transverse magnetic field in radiotherapy of rectal cancer: Impact on the dose distribution

Abstract

Purpose: MRI guidance during radiotherapy has the potential to enable more accurate dose delivery, optimizing the balance between local control and treatment related toxicity. However, the presence of a permanent magnetic field influences the dose delivery, especially around air cavities. Here, electrons are able to return to the surface through which they entered the air cavity (electron return effect, ERE) locally resulting in dose hot- and cold-spots. Where RT of rectal cancer patients might benefit from MRI guidance for margin reduction, air cavities in and around the target volume are frequently present. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the impact of the presence of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field on dose delivery in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Ten patients treated with 5 × 5 Gy RT having large changes in pelvic air content were selected out of a cohort of 33 patients. On the planning CT, a 1.5 T, 6 MV, 7-field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan was created. This plan was subsequently recalculated on daily CT scans. For each daily CT, the CTV V{sub 95%} and V{sub 107%} and bowel area V{sub 5Gy}, V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 15Gy}, V{sub 20Gy}, and V{sub 25Gy} were calculated tomore » evaluate the changes in dose distribution from fraction to fraction. For comparison, the authors repeated this procedure for the 0 T situation. To study the effect of changing air cavities separate from other anatomical changes, the authors also generated artificial air cavities in the CTV of one patient (2 and 5 cm diameter), in the high dose gradient region (2 cm), and in the low dose area (2 cm). Treatment plans were optimized without and with each simulated air cavity. For appearing and disappearing air cavities, the CTV V{sub 95%} and V{sub 107%} were evaluated. The authors also evaluated the ERE separate from attenuation changes locally around appearing gas pockets. Results: For the ten patients, at 1.5 T, the V{sub 95%} was influenced by both appearing and disappearing air, and dropped to <98% in 2 out of 50 fractions due a disappearing air cavity of 150 cm{sup 3}. V{sub 95%} differences between 0 and 1.5 T were all within 2%. The V{sub 107%} was below 1% in 46 out of 50 fractions, and increased to 3% in the remaining fractions due to appearing air of around 120 cm{sup 3}. For comparison, V{sub 107%} was <1% at 0 T for all fractions. In the bowel area, the V{sub 15Gy} varied strongest from fraction to fraction, but differences between 1.5 and 0 T were minimal with an average difference of 2.3 cm{sup 3} (SD = 18.7 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.38). For the simulated air cavities, the ERE resulted in cold-spots maximally 5% lower than prescribed and hot-spots maximally 6% higher than prescribed. Conclusions: The presence of a 1.5 T magnetic field has an impact on the dose distribution when the air content changes of within a few percent in these selected rectal cancer patients. The authors consider this influence of the transverse magnetic field on the dose distribution in IMRT for rectal cancer patients clinically acceptable.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Radiotherapy, NKI-AVL, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands)
  2. RTP Research Group, Elekta, Maryland Heights, Missouri 63043 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22482445
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IMAGE PROCESSING; MAGNETIC FIELDS; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; RECTUM

Citation Formats

Uilkema, Sander, E-mail: s.uilkema@nki.nl, Heide, Uulke van der, Sonke, Jan-Jakob, Triest, Baukelien van, Nijkamp, Jasper, and Moreau, Michel. A 1.5 T transverse magnetic field in radiotherapy of rectal cancer: Impact on the dose distribution. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4936097.
Uilkema, Sander, E-mail: s.uilkema@nki.nl, Heide, Uulke van der, Sonke, Jan-Jakob, Triest, Baukelien van, Nijkamp, Jasper, & Moreau, Michel. A 1.5 T transverse magnetic field in radiotherapy of rectal cancer: Impact on the dose distribution. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4936097.
Uilkema, Sander, E-mail: s.uilkema@nki.nl, Heide, Uulke van der, Sonke, Jan-Jakob, Triest, Baukelien van, Nijkamp, Jasper, and Moreau, Michel. 2015. "A 1.5 T transverse magnetic field in radiotherapy of rectal cancer: Impact on the dose distribution". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4936097.
@article{osti_22482445,
title = {A 1.5 T transverse magnetic field in radiotherapy of rectal cancer: Impact on the dose distribution},
author = {Uilkema, Sander, E-mail: s.uilkema@nki.nl and Heide, Uulke van der and Sonke, Jan-Jakob and Triest, Baukelien van and Nijkamp, Jasper and Moreau, Michel},
abstractNote = {Purpose: MRI guidance during radiotherapy has the potential to enable more accurate dose delivery, optimizing the balance between local control and treatment related toxicity. However, the presence of a permanent magnetic field influences the dose delivery, especially around air cavities. Here, electrons are able to return to the surface through which they entered the air cavity (electron return effect, ERE) locally resulting in dose hot- and cold-spots. Where RT of rectal cancer patients might benefit from MRI guidance for margin reduction, air cavities in and around the target volume are frequently present. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the impact of the presence of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field on dose delivery in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Ten patients treated with 5 × 5 Gy RT having large changes in pelvic air content were selected out of a cohort of 33 patients. On the planning CT, a 1.5 T, 6 MV, 7-field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan was created. This plan was subsequently recalculated on daily CT scans. For each daily CT, the CTV V{sub 95%} and V{sub 107%} and bowel area V{sub 5Gy}, V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 15Gy}, V{sub 20Gy}, and V{sub 25Gy} were calculated to evaluate the changes in dose distribution from fraction to fraction. For comparison, the authors repeated this procedure for the 0 T situation. To study the effect of changing air cavities separate from other anatomical changes, the authors also generated artificial air cavities in the CTV of one patient (2 and 5 cm diameter), in the high dose gradient region (2 cm), and in the low dose area (2 cm). Treatment plans were optimized without and with each simulated air cavity. For appearing and disappearing air cavities, the CTV V{sub 95%} and V{sub 107%} were evaluated. The authors also evaluated the ERE separate from attenuation changes locally around appearing gas pockets. Results: For the ten patients, at 1.5 T, the V{sub 95%} was influenced by both appearing and disappearing air, and dropped to <98% in 2 out of 50 fractions due a disappearing air cavity of 150 cm{sup 3}. V{sub 95%} differences between 0 and 1.5 T were all within 2%. The V{sub 107%} was below 1% in 46 out of 50 fractions, and increased to 3% in the remaining fractions due to appearing air of around 120 cm{sup 3}. For comparison, V{sub 107%} was <1% at 0 T for all fractions. In the bowel area, the V{sub 15Gy} varied strongest from fraction to fraction, but differences between 1.5 and 0 T were minimal with an average difference of 2.3 cm{sup 3} (SD = 18.7 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.38). For the simulated air cavities, the ERE resulted in cold-spots maximally 5% lower than prescribed and hot-spots maximally 6% higher than prescribed. Conclusions: The presence of a 1.5 T magnetic field has an impact on the dose distribution when the air content changes of within a few percent in these selected rectal cancer patients. The authors consider this influence of the transverse magnetic field on the dose distribution in IMRT for rectal cancer patients clinically acceptable.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4936097},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 12,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month =
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT), with special emphasis on the relationship between the incidence of rectal bleeding and the rectal dose from HDR brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 100 patients who were treated by HDR brachytherapy combined with EBRT for {>=}12 months were analyzed. The fractionation schema for HDR brachytherapy was prospectively changed, and the total radiation dose for EBRT was fixed at 51 Gy. The distribution of the fractionation schema used in the patients was as follows: 5 Gy xmore » 5 in 13 patients; 7 Gy x 3 in 19 patients; and 9 Gy x 2 in 68 patients. Results: Ten patients (10%) developed Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. Regarding the correlation with dosimetric factors, no significant differences were found in the average percentage of the entire rectal volume receiving 30%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed radiation dose from EBRT between those with bleeding and those without. The average percentage of the entire rectal volume receiving 10%, 30%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed radiation dose from HDR brachytherapy in those who developed rectal bleeding was 77.9%, 28.6%, 9.0%, 1.5%, and 0.3%, respectively, and was 69.2%, 22.2%, 6.6%, 0.9%, and 0.4%, respectively, in those without bleeding. The differences in the percentages of the entire rectal volume receiving 10%, 30%, and 50% between those with and without bleeding were statistically significant. Conclusions: The rectal dose from HDR brachytherapy for patients with prostate cancer may have a significant impact on the incidence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate whether the risk of local recurrence depends on the biologic effective dose (BED) or fractionation dose in patients with resectable rectal cancer undergoing preoperative radiotherapy (RT) compared with surgery alone. Methods and Materials: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed. The MEDLINE, Embase, CancerLit, and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched for evidence. To evaluate the dose-response relationship, we conducted a meta-regression analysis. Four subgroups were created: Group 1, RCTs with a BED >30 Gy{sub 10} and a short RT schedule; Group 2, RCTs with BED >30 Gy{sub 10} and a long RT schedule; Groupmore » 3, RCTs with BED {<=}30 Gy{sub 10} and a short RT schedule; and Group 4, RCTs with BED {<=}30 Gy{sub 10} and a long RT schedule. Results: Our review identified 21 RCTs, yielding 9,097 patients. The pooled results from these 21 randomized trials of preoperative RT showed a significant reduction in mortality for groups 1 (p = .004) and 2 (p = .03). For local recurrence, the results were also significant in groups 1 (p = .00001) and 2 (p = .00001).The only subgroup that showed a greater sphincter preservation (SP) rate than surgery was group 2 (p = .03). The dose-response curve was linear (p = .006), and RT decreased the risk of local recurrence by about 1.7% for each Gy{sub 10} of BED. Conclusion: Our data have shown that RT with a BED of >30 Gy{sub 10} is more efficient in reducing local recurrence and mortality rates than a BED of {<=}30 Gy{sub 10}, independent of the schedule of fractionation used. A long RT schedule with a BED of >30 Gy{sub 10} should be recommended for sphincter preservation.« less
  • Purpose: RapidPlan uses a library consisting of expert plans from different patients to create a model that can predict achievable dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for new patients. The goal of this study is to investigate the impacts of model library population (plan numbers) on the DVH prediction for rectal cancer patients treated with volumetric-modulated radiotherapy (VMAT) Methods: Ninety clinically accepted rectal cancer patients’ VMAT plans were selected to establish 3 models, named as Model30, Model60 and Model90, with 30,60, and 90 plans in the model training. All plans had sufficient target coverage and bladder and femora sparings. Additional 10 patients weremore » enrolled to test the DVH prediction differences with these 3 models. The predicted DVHs from these 3 models were compared and analyzed. Results: Predicted V40 (Vx, percent of volume that received x Gy for the organs at risk) and Dmean (mean dose, cGy) of the bladder were 39.84±13.38 and 2029.4±141.6 for the Model30,37.52±16.00 and 2012.5±152.2 for the Model60, and 36.33±18.35 and 2066.5±174.3 for the Model90. Predicted V30 and Dmean of the left femur were 23.33±9.96 and 1443.3±114.5 for the Model30, 21.83±5.75 and 1436.6±61.9 for the Model60, and 20.31±4.6 and 1415.0±52.4 for the Model90.There were no significant differences among the 3 models for the bladder and left femur predictions. Predicted V40 and Dmean of the right femur were 19.86±10.00 and 1403.6±115.6 (Model30),18.97±6.19 and 1401.9±68.78 (Model60), and 21.08±7.82 and 1424.0±85.3 (Model90). Although a slight lower DVH prediction of the right femur was found on the Model60, the mean differences for V30 and mean dose were less than 2% and 1%, respectively. Conclusion: There were no significant differences among Model30, Model60 and Model90 for predicting DVHs on rectal patients treated with VMAT. The impact of plan numbers for model library might be limited for cancers with similar target shape.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the improvement in dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field that maintains the same direction of Lorentz force between two fields. The investigation has a potential application in future Linac-MR units. Methods: Computed tomography images of four patients and magnetic fields of 0.25–1.5 Tesla (T) were used for Monte Carlo simulation. Two patients had intact breast while the other two had mastectomy. Simulations of planning and chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical process. The direction of superior-inferior magnetic field for the medial treatment beam was reversed for the lateralmore » beam. Results: For the ipsilateral lung and heart mean doses were reduced by a mean (range) of 45.8% (27.6%–58.6%) and 26.0% (20.2%–38.9%), respectively, depending on various treatment plan setups. The mean V{sub 20} for ipsilateral lung was reduced by 55.0% (43.6%–77.3%). In addition acceptable results were shown after simulation of 0.25 T magnetic field demonstrated in dose-volume reductions of the heart, ipsilateral lung, and noninvolved skin. Conclusions: Applying a reversible magnetic field during breast radiotherapy, not only reduces the dose to the lung and heart but also produces a sharp drop dose volume histogram for planning target volume, because of bending of the path of secondary charged particles toward the chest wall by the Lorentz force. The simulations have shown that use of the magnetic field at 1.5 T is not feasible for clinical applications due to the increase of ipsilateral chest wall skin dose in comparison to the conventional planning while 0.25 T is suitable for all patients due to dose reduction to the chest wall skin.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the improvement in dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field that maintains the same direction of Lorentz force between two fields. The investigation has a potential application in future Linac-MR units. Methods: Computed tomography images of four patients and magnetic fields of 0.25–1.5 Tesla (T) were used for Monte Carlo simulation. Two patients had intact breast while the other two had mastectomy. Simulations of planning and chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical process. The direction of superior-inferior magnetic field for the medial treatment beam was reversed for the lateralmore » beam. Results: For the ipsilateral lung and heart mean doses were reduced by a mean (range) of 45.8% (27.6%–58.6%) and 26.0% (20.2%–38.9%), respectively, depending on various treatment plan setups. The mean V{sub 20} for ipsilateral lung was reduced by 55.0% (43.6%–77.3%). In addition acceptable results were shown after simulation of 0.25 T magnetic field demonstrated in dose-volume reductions of the heart, ipsilateral lung, and noninvolved skin. Conclusions: Applying a reversible magnetic field during breast radiotherapy, not only reduces the dose to the lung and heart but also produces a sharp drop dose volume histogram for planning target volume, because of bending of the path of secondary charged particles toward the chest wall by the Lorentz force. The simulations have shown that use of the magnetic field at 1.5 T is not feasible for clinical applications due to the increase of ipsilateral chest wall skin dose in comparison to the conventional planning while 0.25 T is suitable for all patients due to dose reduction to the chest wall skin.« less