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Title: Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes: A better field emitter and stable nanofluid with better thermal conductivity

Abstract

Highlights: • Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). • Improved dispersion enhanced thermal conductivity of engine oil. • Again f-a-CNTs showed enhanced field emission property compared to pure a-CNTs. - Abstract: Amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) were synthesized at low temperature in open atmosphere and further functionalized by treating them in thionyl chloride added stearic acid-dichloro methane solution. The as prepared functionalized a-CNTs (f-a-CNTs) were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The nanofluid was prepared by dispersing f-a-CNTs in engine oil using ultrasonic treatment. The effective thermal conductivity of as prepared nanofluid was investigated at different loading (volume fraction of f-a-CNTs). Obtained experimental data of thermal conductivity were compared with the predicted values, calculated using existing theoretical models. Stability of the nanofluid was tested by means of zeta potential measurement to optimize the loading. The as prepared f-a-CNTs sample also showed improved field emission result as compared to pristine a-CNTs. Dependence of field emission behavior on inter electrode distance was investigated too.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)
  2. Thin Film & Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)
  3. (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22475781
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials Research Bulletin; Journal Volume: 66; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2015 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; CARBON NANOTUBES; DISTANCE; FIELD EMISSION; FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROMETERS; RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; STABILITY; SYNTHESIS; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY; THIONYL CHLORIDES; TRANSMISSION; X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Sarkar, S.K., Jha, A., Chattopadhyay, K.K., E-mail: kalyan_chattopadhyay@yahoo.com, and School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032. Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes: A better field emitter and stable nanofluid with better thermal conductivity. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/J.MATERRESBULL.2015.01.048.
Sarkar, S.K., Jha, A., Chattopadhyay, K.K., E-mail: kalyan_chattopadhyay@yahoo.com, & School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032. Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes: A better field emitter and stable nanofluid with better thermal conductivity. United States. doi:10.1016/J.MATERRESBULL.2015.01.048.
Sarkar, S.K., Jha, A., Chattopadhyay, K.K., E-mail: kalyan_chattopadhyay@yahoo.com, and School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032. Mon . "Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes: A better field emitter and stable nanofluid with better thermal conductivity". United States. doi:10.1016/J.MATERRESBULL.2015.01.048.
@article{osti_22475781,
title = {Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes: A better field emitter and stable nanofluid with better thermal conductivity},
author = {Sarkar, S.K. and Jha, A. and Chattopadhyay, K.K., E-mail: kalyan_chattopadhyay@yahoo.com and School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032},
abstractNote = {Highlights: • Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). • Improved dispersion enhanced thermal conductivity of engine oil. • Again f-a-CNTs showed enhanced field emission property compared to pure a-CNTs. - Abstract: Amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) were synthesized at low temperature in open atmosphere and further functionalized by treating them in thionyl chloride added stearic acid-dichloro methane solution. The as prepared functionalized a-CNTs (f-a-CNTs) were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The nanofluid was prepared by dispersing f-a-CNTs in engine oil using ultrasonic treatment. The effective thermal conductivity of as prepared nanofluid was investigated at different loading (volume fraction of f-a-CNTs). Obtained experimental data of thermal conductivity were compared with the predicted values, calculated using existing theoretical models. Stability of the nanofluid was tested by means of zeta potential measurement to optimize the loading. The as prepared f-a-CNTs sample also showed improved field emission result as compared to pristine a-CNTs. Dependence of field emission behavior on inter electrode distance was investigated too.},
doi = {10.1016/J.MATERRESBULL.2015.01.048},
journal = {Materials Research Bulletin},
number = ,
volume = 66,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
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