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Title: Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction from a crystal with subsurface defects

Abstract

The diffraction of X rays incident on a crystal surface under grazing angles under conditions of total external reflection has been investigated. An approach is proposed in which exact solutions to the dynamic problem of grazing-incidence diffraction in an ideal crystal are used as initial functions to calculate the diffuse component of diffraction in a crystal with defects. The diffuse component of diffraction is calculated for a crystal with surface defects of a dilatation-center type. Exact formulas of the continuum theory which take into account the mirror-image forces are used for defect-induced atomic displacements. Scattering intensity maps near Bragg peaks are constructed for different scan modes, and the conditions for detecting primarily the diffuse component are determined. The results of dynamic calculations of grazing-incidence diffraction in defect-containing crystals are compared with calculations in the kinematic approximation.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Metal Physics (Ukraine)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22472412
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Crystallography Reports; Journal Volume: 60; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2015 Pleiades Publishing, Inc.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ATOMIC DISPLACEMENTS; BRAGG CURVE; BRAGG REFLECTION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CRYSTAL DEFECTS; CRYSTALS; EXACT SOLUTIONS; MIRRORS; REFLECTION; SURFACES; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Gaevskii, A. Yu., E-mail: transilv@mail.ru, and Golentus, I. E. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction from a crystal with subsurface defects. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063774515010095.
Gaevskii, A. Yu., E-mail: transilv@mail.ru, & Golentus, I. E. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction from a crystal with subsurface defects. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063774515010095.
Gaevskii, A. Yu., E-mail: transilv@mail.ru, and Golentus, I. E. Sun . "Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction from a crystal with subsurface defects". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063774515010095.
@article{osti_22472412,
title = {Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction from a crystal with subsurface defects},
author = {Gaevskii, A. Yu., E-mail: transilv@mail.ru and Golentus, I. E.},
abstractNote = {The diffraction of X rays incident on a crystal surface under grazing angles under conditions of total external reflection has been investigated. An approach is proposed in which exact solutions to the dynamic problem of grazing-incidence diffraction in an ideal crystal are used as initial functions to calculate the diffuse component of diffraction in a crystal with defects. The diffuse component of diffraction is calculated for a crystal with surface defects of a dilatation-center type. Exact formulas of the continuum theory which take into account the mirror-image forces are used for defect-induced atomic displacements. Scattering intensity maps near Bragg peaks are constructed for different scan modes, and the conditions for detecting primarily the diffuse component are determined. The results of dynamic calculations of grazing-incidence diffraction in defect-containing crystals are compared with calculations in the kinematic approximation.},
doi = {10.1134/S1063774515010095},
journal = {Crystallography Reports},
number = 2,
volume = 60,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Sun Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
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