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Title: Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

Abstract

Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosamore » cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. - Highlights: • PM forms ovarian DNA adducts. • DNA damage marker γH2AX increased by PM exposure. • PM induces ovarian DNA double strand break repair.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22465688
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 282; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ADP; BRASSICA; CONCENTRATION RATIO; DMSO; DNA; DNA ADDUCTS; DNA REPAIR; DOSES; ENDOXAN; GENE RECOMBINATION; GENES; NEOPLASMS; OVARIES; PHOSPHATES; PHOSPHOTRANSFERASES; RATS; RIBOSE; STRAND BREAKS; VIABILITY

Citation Formats

Ganesan, Shanthi, E-mail: shanthig@iastate.edu, and Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2014.11.017.
Ganesan, Shanthi, E-mail: shanthig@iastate.edu, & Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells. United States. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2014.11.017.
Ganesan, Shanthi, E-mail: shanthig@iastate.edu, and Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu. Sun . "Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells". United States. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2014.11.017.
@article{osti_22465688,
title = {Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells},
author = {Ganesan, Shanthi, E-mail: shanthig@iastate.edu and Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu},
abstractNote = {Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. - Highlights: • PM forms ovarian DNA adducts. • DNA damage marker γH2AX increased by PM exposure. • PM induces ovarian DNA double strand break repair.},
doi = {10.1016/J.TAAP.2014.11.017},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 3,
volume = 282,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Sun Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}
  • Healthy oocytes are critical for producing healthy children, but little is known about whether or not oocytes have the capacity to identify and recover from injury. Using a model ovotoxic alkylating drug, cyclophosphamide (CPA), and its active metabolite, phosphoramide mustard (PM), we previously showed that PM ({>=} 3 {mu}M) caused significant follicle loss in postnatal day 4 (PND4) mouse ovaries in vitro. We now investigate whether PM induces DNA damage in oocytes, examining histone H2AX phosphorylation ({gamma}H2AX), a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Exposure of cultured PND4 mouse ovaries to 3 and 0.1 {mu}M PM induced significant losses ofmore » primordial and small primary follicles, respectively. PM-induced {gamma}H2AX was observed predominantly in oocytes, in which foci of {gamma}H2AX staining increased in a concentration-dependent manner and peaked 18-24 h after exposure to 3-10 {mu}M PM. Numbers of oocytes with {>=} 5 {gamma}H2AX foci were significantly increased both 1 and 8 days after exposure to {>=} 1 {mu}M PM compared to controls. Inhibiting the kinases that phosphorylate H2AX significantly increased follicle loss relative to PM alone. In adult mice, CPA also induced follicle loss in vivo. PM also significantly decreased primordial follicle numbers ({>=} 30 {mu}M) and increased {gamma}H2AX foci ({>=} 3 {mu}M) in cultured PND4 Sprague-Dawley rat ovaries. Results suggest oocytes can detect PM-induced damage at or below concentrations which cause significant follicle loss, and there are quantitative species-specific differences in sensitivity. Surviving oocytes with DNA damage may represent an increased risk for fertility problems or unhealthy offspring.« less
  • A study of meiotic and postmeiotic germ-cell-stage sensitivity of male mice to induction of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) by acrylamide showed that DNA repair could be detected in early spermatocytes (after the last scheduled DNA synthesis) through about mid-spermatid stages. No DNA repair could be detected in later stages. The maximum UDS response was observed 6 hr after i.p. exposure and was about 5 times greater than the response measured immediately after treatment. This is the longest delay between chemical treatment and maximum UDS response yet observed in mouse germ cells. There was a linear relationship between the UDS responsemore » and acrylamide exposure from 7.8 to 125 mg/kg. By using 14C-labeled acrylamide it was determined that the temporal pattern of adduct formation in testes DNA paralleled that of the UDS response, with maximum binding occurring 4 to 6 hr after exposure. In contrast, the temporal pattern of adduct formation in liver DNA showed maximum binding within 1 to 2 hr after exposure and was an order of magnitude greater than that found for the testis DNA.« less
  • 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) destroys ovarian follicles at all stages of development. This study investigated DMBA-induced DNA double strand break (DSB) formation with subsequent activation of the ovarian DNA repair response in models of pre-antral or pre-ovulatory follicle loss. Postnatal day (PND) 4 Fisher 344 (F344) rat ovaries were cultured for 4 days followed by single exposures of vehicle control (1% DMSO) or DMBA (12.5 nM or 75 nM) and maintained in culture for 4 or 8 days. Alternately, PND4 F344 rat ovaries were exposed to 1 μM DMBA at the start of culture for 2 days. Total RNA or protein wasmore » isolated, followed by qPCR or Western blotting to quantify mRNA or protein level, respectively. γH2AX and phosphorylated ATM were localized and quantified using immunofluorescence staining. DMBA exposure increased caspase 3 and γH2AX protein. Additionally, DMBA (12.5 nM and 1 μM) increased levels of mRNA encoding Atm, Xrcc6, Brca1 and Rad51. In contrast, Parp1 mRNA was decreased on d4 and increased on d8 of DMBA exposure, while PARP1 protein increased after 8 days of DMBA exposure. Total ATM increased in a concentration-dependent temporal pattern (75 nM d4; 12.5 nM d8), while pATM was localized in large primary and secondary follicles and increased after 8 days of 75 nM DMBA exposure compared to both control and 12.5 nM DMBA. These findings support that, despite some concentration effects, DMBA induces ovarian DNA damage and that DNA repair mechanisms are induced as a potential mechanism to prevent follicle loss. - Highlights: • DMBA exposure increases ovarian caspase-3 protein expression. • DMBA exposure increases the γH2AX protein in oocytes. • DMBA exposure activates a DNA repair response in the ovary.« less
  • The distribution and movement of cholesterol were studied in granulosa cells from the ovaries of estrogen-stimulated hypophysectomized immature rats cultured in serum-free medium. Plasma membrane cholesterol was distinguished from intracellular cholesterol with cholesterol oxidase, an enzyme that converts cell surface cholesterol to cholestenone, leaving intracellular cholesterol untouched. Using this approach we showed that 82% of unesterified cholesterol was associated with the plasma membrane in granulosa cells cultured for 48 h in serum-free medium in both the presence and absence of added androstenedione and FSH. FSH and androstenedione stimulated a marked increase in steroid hormone (progestin) production. The movement of newlymore » synthesized cholesterol to the plasma membrane also was followed using cholesterol oxidase. Newly synthesized cholesterol reached the plasma membrane too rapidly to be measured in unstimulated cells (t1/2 less than 20 min); however, in cells stimulated by FSH and androstenedione, this rate was considerably slower (t1/2 approximately 2h). Therefore, cholesterol movement to the plasma membrane appears to be regulated by gonadotropins in these cells. We tested whether steroid biosynthesis used all cell cholesterol pools equally. To this end we administered (3H)acetate and (14C)acetate at different times and determined their relative specific contents in various steroids after defined intervals. The relative ages of the steroids (youngest to oldest) were: lanosterol, progestins, intracellular cholesterol, and plasma membrane cholesterol. This finding suggests that progestins use newly synthesized intracellular cholesterol in preference to preexisting intracellular or cell surface cholesterol.« less
  • Cytochrome CYP1A (CYP1A) enzymes catalyze bioactivation of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) to genotoxic metabolites. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CYP1A2 catalyzes formation of MC-DNA adducts that are preferentially formed in the promoter region of CYP1A1, resulting in modulation of CYP1A1 gene expression. MC bound covalently to plasmid DNA (50 {mu}g) containing human CYP1A1 promoter (pGL3-1A1), when incubated with wild-type (WT) liver microsomes (2 mg) and NAPPH 37 {sup o}C for 2 h, giving rise to 9 adducts, as determined by {sup 32}P-postlabeling. Eighty percent of adducts was located in the promoter region. Transient transfection of the adducted plasmids into rat hepatomamore » (H4IIE) cells for 16 h, followed by MC (1 {mu}M) treatment for 24 h inhibited reporter (luciferase) gene expression by 75%, compared to unadducted controls. Our results suggest that CYP1A2 plays a key role in sequence-specific MC-DNA adduct formation in the CYP1A1 promoter region, leading to attenuation of CYP1A1 gene expression.« less