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Title: Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B

Abstract

Aim: This study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of ghrelin on intestinal barrier dysfunction in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Methods and results: Acute colitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by administering 2.5% DSS. Saline or 25, 125, 250 μg/kg ghrelin was administrated intraperitoneally (IP) to mice 1 day before colitis induction and on days 4, 5, and 6 after DSS administration. IP injection of a ghrelin receptor antagonist, [D-lys{sup 3}]-GHRP-6, was performed immediately prior to ghrelin injection. Ghrelin (125 or 250 μg/kg) could reduce the disease activity index, histological score, and myeloperoxidase activities in experimental colitis, and also prevented shortening of the colon. Ghrelin could prevent the reduction of transepithelial electrical resistance and tight junction expression, and bolstered tight junction structural integrity and regulated cytokine secretion. Ultimately, ghrelin inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory κB-α, myosin light chain kinase, and phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 activation. Conclusions: Ghrelin prevented the breakdown of intestinal barrier function in DSS-induced colitis. The protective effects of ghrelin on intestinal barrier function were mediated by its receptor GHSR-1a. The inhibition of NF-κB activation might be part of the mechanism underlying the effects of ghrelin that protect against barrier dysfunction. - Highlights: • Ghrelinmore » ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis. • The effect of ghrelin is mediated by GHSR-1a. • Inhibition of NF-κB activation.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2]; ;  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Department of Gastroenterology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China)
  2. Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22458507
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 458; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2015 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; DEXTRAN; DISEASES; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; INJECTION; LARGE INTESTINE; MICE; MYOSIN; RECEPTORS; SECRETION; SODIUM; SULFATES

Citation Formats

Cheng, Jian, Zhang, Lin, Dai, Weiqi, Mao, Yuqing, Li, Sainan, Wang, Jingjie, Li, Huanqing, Guo, Chuanyong, and Fan, Xiaoming, E-mail: xiaomingfan57@sina.com. Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2015.01.083.
Cheng, Jian, Zhang, Lin, Dai, Weiqi, Mao, Yuqing, Li, Sainan, Wang, Jingjie, Li, Huanqing, Guo, Chuanyong, & Fan, Xiaoming, E-mail: xiaomingfan57@sina.com. Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2015.01.083.
Cheng, Jian, Zhang, Lin, Dai, Weiqi, Mao, Yuqing, Li, Sainan, Wang, Jingjie, Li, Huanqing, Guo, Chuanyong, and Fan, Xiaoming, E-mail: xiaomingfan57@sina.com. Fri . "Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2015.01.083.
@article{osti_22458507,
title = {Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B},
author = {Cheng, Jian and Zhang, Lin and Dai, Weiqi and Mao, Yuqing and Li, Sainan and Wang, Jingjie and Li, Huanqing and Guo, Chuanyong and Fan, Xiaoming, E-mail: xiaomingfan57@sina.com},
abstractNote = {Aim: This study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of ghrelin on intestinal barrier dysfunction in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Methods and results: Acute colitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by administering 2.5% DSS. Saline or 25, 125, 250 μg/kg ghrelin was administrated intraperitoneally (IP) to mice 1 day before colitis induction and on days 4, 5, and 6 after DSS administration. IP injection of a ghrelin receptor antagonist, [D-lys{sup 3}]-GHRP-6, was performed immediately prior to ghrelin injection. Ghrelin (125 or 250 μg/kg) could reduce the disease activity index, histological score, and myeloperoxidase activities in experimental colitis, and also prevented shortening of the colon. Ghrelin could prevent the reduction of transepithelial electrical resistance and tight junction expression, and bolstered tight junction structural integrity and regulated cytokine secretion. Ultimately, ghrelin inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory κB-α, myosin light chain kinase, and phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 activation. Conclusions: Ghrelin prevented the breakdown of intestinal barrier function in DSS-induced colitis. The protective effects of ghrelin on intestinal barrier function were mediated by its receptor GHSR-1a. The inhibition of NF-κB activation might be part of the mechanism underlying the effects of ghrelin that protect against barrier dysfunction. - Highlights: • Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis. • The effect of ghrelin is mediated by GHSR-1a. • Inhibition of NF-κB activation.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2015.01.083},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 1,
volume = 458,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 27 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Fri Feb 27 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}
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