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Title: Life cycle impact assessment of ammonia production in Algeria: A comparison with previous studies

Abstract

In this paper, a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) from “cradle to gate” of one anhydrous ton of ammonia with a purity of 99% was achieved. Particularly, the energy and environmental performance of the product (ammonia) were evaluated. The eco-profile of the product and the share of each stage of the Life Cycle on the whole environmental impacts have been evaluated. The flows of material and energy for each phase of the life cycle were counted and the associated environmental problems were identified. Evaluation of the impact was achieved using GEMIS 4.7 software. The primary data collection was executed at the production installations located in Algeria (Annaba locality). The analysis was conducted according to the LCA standards ISO 14040 series. The results show that Cumulative Energy Requirement (CER) is of 51.945 × 10{sup 3} MJ/t of ammonia, which is higher than the global average. Global Warming Potential (GWP) is of 1.44 t CO{sub 2} eq/t of ammonia; this value is lower than the world average. Tropospheric ozone precursor and Acidification are also studied in this article, their values are: 549.3 × 10{sup −6} t NMVOC eq and 259.3 × 10{sup −6} t SO{sub 2} eq respectively.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22447500
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Impact Assessment Review; Journal Volume: 50; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ACIDIFICATION; ALGERIA; AMMONIA; CARBON DIOXIDE; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPUTER CODES; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; GLOBAL ASPECTS; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; IMPURITIES; INSTALLATION; ISO; LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT; LOCALITY; OZONE; PERFORMANCE; POTENTIALS; PRECURSOR; STANDARDS; SULFUR DIOXIDE

Citation Formats

Makhlouf, Ali, E-mail: almakhsme@gmail.com, Serradj, Tayeb, and Cheniti, Hamza. Life cycle impact assessment of ammonia production in Algeria: A comparison with previous studies. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2014.08.003.
Makhlouf, Ali, E-mail: almakhsme@gmail.com, Serradj, Tayeb, & Cheniti, Hamza. Life cycle impact assessment of ammonia production in Algeria: A comparison with previous studies. United States. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2014.08.003.
Makhlouf, Ali, E-mail: almakhsme@gmail.com, Serradj, Tayeb, and Cheniti, Hamza. Thu . "Life cycle impact assessment of ammonia production in Algeria: A comparison with previous studies". United States. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2014.08.003.
@article{osti_22447500,
title = {Life cycle impact assessment of ammonia production in Algeria: A comparison with previous studies},
author = {Makhlouf, Ali, E-mail: almakhsme@gmail.com and Serradj, Tayeb and Cheniti, Hamza},
abstractNote = {In this paper, a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) from “cradle to gate” of one anhydrous ton of ammonia with a purity of 99% was achieved. Particularly, the energy and environmental performance of the product (ammonia) were evaluated. The eco-profile of the product and the share of each stage of the Life Cycle on the whole environmental impacts have been evaluated. The flows of material and energy for each phase of the life cycle were counted and the associated environmental problems were identified. Evaluation of the impact was achieved using GEMIS 4.7 software. The primary data collection was executed at the production installations located in Algeria (Annaba locality). The analysis was conducted according to the LCA standards ISO 14040 series. The results show that Cumulative Energy Requirement (CER) is of 51.945 × 10{sup 3} MJ/t of ammonia, which is higher than the global average. Global Warming Potential (GWP) is of 1.44 t CO{sub 2} eq/t of ammonia; this value is lower than the world average. Tropospheric ozone precursor and Acidification are also studied in this article, their values are: 549.3 × 10{sup −6} t NMVOC eq and 259.3 × 10{sup −6} t SO{sub 2} eq respectively.},
doi = {10.1016/J.EIAR.2014.08.003},
journal = {Environmental Impact Assessment Review},
number = ,
volume = 50,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Thu Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}
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