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Title: Importance of patient education on home medical care waste disposal in Japan

Abstract

Highlights: • Attached office nurses more recovered medical waste from patients’ homes. • Most nurses educated their patients on how to store home medical care waste in their homes and on how to separate them. • Around half of nurses educated their patients on where to dispose of their home medical care waste. - Abstract: To determine current practices in the disposal and handling of home medical care (HMC) waste, a questionnaire was mailed to 1965 offices nationwide. Of the office that responded, 1283 offices were analyzed. Offices were classified by management configuration: those attached to hospitals were classified as ”attached offices” and others as “independent offices”. More nurses from attached offices recovered medical waste from patients’ homes than those from independent offices. Most nurses educated their patients on how to store HMC waste in their homes (79.3% of total) and on how to separate HMC waste (76.5% of total). On the other hand, only around half of nurses (47.3% from attached offices and 53.2% from independent offices) educated their patients on where to dispose of their HMC waste. 66.0% of offices replied that patients had separated their waste appropriately. The need for patient education has emerged in recent years,more » with education for nurses under the diverse conditions of HMC being a key factor in patient education.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22443581
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Waste Management; Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; EDUCATION; HOSPITALS; JAPAN; MEDICAL PERSONNEL; PATIENTS; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTES

Citation Formats

Ikeda, Yukihiro, E-mail: yuyu@med.kindai.ac.jp. Importance of patient education on home medical care waste disposal in Japan. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2014.04.017.
Ikeda, Yukihiro, E-mail: yuyu@med.kindai.ac.jp. Importance of patient education on home medical care waste disposal in Japan. United States. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2014.04.017.
Ikeda, Yukihiro, E-mail: yuyu@med.kindai.ac.jp. Tue . "Importance of patient education on home medical care waste disposal in Japan". United States. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2014.04.017.
@article{osti_22443581,
title = {Importance of patient education on home medical care waste disposal in Japan},
author = {Ikeda, Yukihiro, E-mail: yuyu@med.kindai.ac.jp},
abstractNote = {Highlights: • Attached office nurses more recovered medical waste from patients’ homes. • Most nurses educated their patients on how to store home medical care waste in their homes and on how to separate them. • Around half of nurses educated their patients on where to dispose of their home medical care waste. - Abstract: To determine current practices in the disposal and handling of home medical care (HMC) waste, a questionnaire was mailed to 1965 offices nationwide. Of the office that responded, 1283 offices were analyzed. Offices were classified by management configuration: those attached to hospitals were classified as ”attached offices” and others as “independent offices”. More nurses from attached offices recovered medical waste from patients’ homes than those from independent offices. Most nurses educated their patients on how to store HMC waste in their homes (79.3% of total) and on how to separate HMC waste (76.5% of total). On the other hand, only around half of nurses (47.3% from attached offices and 53.2% from independent offices) educated their patients on where to dispose of their HMC waste. 66.0% of offices replied that patients had separated their waste appropriately. The need for patient education has emerged in recent years, with education for nurses under the diverse conditions of HMC being a key factor in patient education.},
doi = {10.1016/J.WASMAN.2014.04.017},
journal = {Waste Management},
number = 7,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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