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Title: Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats

Abstract

The lipid peroxidation end-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is generated in tissues during oxidative stress. As a reactive aldehyde, it forms Michael adducts with nucleophiles, a process that disrupts cellular functioning. Liver, lung and brain are highly sensitive to xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress and readily generate 4-HNE. In the present studies, we compared 4-HNE metabolism in these tissues, a process that protects against tissue injury. 4-HNE was degraded slowly in total homogenates and S9 fractions of mouse liver, lung and brain. In liver, but not lung or brain, NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H markedly stimulated 4-HNE metabolism. Similar results were observed in rat S9 fractions from these tissues. In liver, lung and brain S9 fractions, 4-HNE formed protein adducts. When NADH was used to stimulate 4-HNE metabolism, the formation of protein adducts was suppressed in liver, but not lung or brain. In both mouse and rat tissues, 4-HNE was also metabolized by glutathione S-transferases. The greatest activity was noted in livers of mice and in lungs of rats; relatively low glutathione S-transferase activity was detected in brain. In mouse hepatocytes, 4-HNE was rapidly taken up and metabolized. Simultaneously, 4-HNE-protein adducts were formed, suggesting that 4-HNE metabolism in intact cells does not prevent protein modifications. Thesemore » data demonstrate that, in contrast to liver, lung and brain have a limited capacity to metabolize 4-HNE. The persistence of 4-HNE in these tissues may increase the likelihood of tissue injury during oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a highly reactive aldehyde. • Rodent liver, but not lung or brain, is efficient in degrading 4-hydroxynonenal. • 4-hydroxynonenal persists in tissues with low metabolism, causing tissue damage.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [2]
  1. Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University-Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ (United States)
  2. Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers University-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)
  3. Environmental Science, School of Health Sciences and Practice, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22439803
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 279; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE; ANIMAL TISSUES; BRAIN; GLUTATHIONE; HOMOGENATES; INJURIES; LIPIDS; LIVER; LIVER CELLS; LUNGS; METABOLISM; MICE; NAD; OXIDATION; RATS; STRESSES; TOXICITY; TRANSFERASES

Citation Formats

Zheng, Ruijin, Dragomir, Ana-Cristina, Mishin, Vladimir, Richardson, Jason R., Heck, Diane E., Laskin, Debra L., and Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2014.04.026.
Zheng, Ruijin, Dragomir, Ana-Cristina, Mishin, Vladimir, Richardson, Jason R., Heck, Diane E., Laskin, Debra L., & Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats. United States. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2014.04.026.
Zheng, Ruijin, Dragomir, Ana-Cristina, Mishin, Vladimir, Richardson, Jason R., Heck, Diane E., Laskin, Debra L., and Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu. Fri . "Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats". United States. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2014.04.026.
@article{osti_22439803,
title = {Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats},
author = {Zheng, Ruijin and Dragomir, Ana-Cristina and Mishin, Vladimir and Richardson, Jason R. and Heck, Diane E. and Laskin, Debra L. and Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu},
abstractNote = {The lipid peroxidation end-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is generated in tissues during oxidative stress. As a reactive aldehyde, it forms Michael adducts with nucleophiles, a process that disrupts cellular functioning. Liver, lung and brain are highly sensitive to xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress and readily generate 4-HNE. In the present studies, we compared 4-HNE metabolism in these tissues, a process that protects against tissue injury. 4-HNE was degraded slowly in total homogenates and S9 fractions of mouse liver, lung and brain. In liver, but not lung or brain, NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H markedly stimulated 4-HNE metabolism. Similar results were observed in rat S9 fractions from these tissues. In liver, lung and brain S9 fractions, 4-HNE formed protein adducts. When NADH was used to stimulate 4-HNE metabolism, the formation of protein adducts was suppressed in liver, but not lung or brain. In both mouse and rat tissues, 4-HNE was also metabolized by glutathione S-transferases. The greatest activity was noted in livers of mice and in lungs of rats; relatively low glutathione S-transferase activity was detected in brain. In mouse hepatocytes, 4-HNE was rapidly taken up and metabolized. Simultaneously, 4-HNE-protein adducts were formed, suggesting that 4-HNE metabolism in intact cells does not prevent protein modifications. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to liver, lung and brain have a limited capacity to metabolize 4-HNE. The persistence of 4-HNE in these tissues may increase the likelihood of tissue injury during oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a highly reactive aldehyde. • Rodent liver, but not lung or brain, is efficient in degrading 4-hydroxynonenal. • 4-hydroxynonenal persists in tissues with low metabolism, causing tissue damage.},
doi = {10.1016/J.TAAP.2014.04.026},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 1,
volume = 279,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}