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Title: Triclosan exacerbates the presence of {sup 14}C-bisphenol A in tissues of female and male mice

Abstract

Current human generations are commonly exposed to both triclosan (TCS), an antimicrobial agent, and bisphenol A (BPA), the monomer of polycarbonate plastics and epoxies. Both are readily absorbed into circulation and found distributed among diverse tissues. Potential interactions between TCS and BPA are largely unstudied. We investigated whether TCS exposure affects the distribution of ingested {sup 14}C-BPA in select tissues. CF-1 mice were each subcutaneously injected with TCS then orally administered 50 μg/kg {sup 14}C-BPA. Females received 0, 0.2, 0.6, 1, 2, or 18 mg TCS (equivalent respectively to 0, 6.3, 16.9, 30.1, 60.5, and 558.9 mg/kg). Males received 0, 0.2, 2, or 18 mg TCS (equivalent respectively to 0, 5.3, 53.4, and 415.0 mg/kg). Levels of radioactivity were measured through liquid scintillation counting in blood serum and brain, reproductive, and other tissues. Significantly elevated levels of radioactivity were observed following combined TCS and {sup 14}C-BPA administration, with minimally effective TCS doses being tissue-dependent (Females: lungs, 0.6 mg; uterus, 1 mg; heart, muscle, ovaries, and serum, 18 mg. Males: serum, 0.2 mg; epididymides, 2 mg). Subsequently, we found that 2 or 6 mg TCS increased radioactivity in the ovaries and serum of females orally given only 5 μg/kg {sup 14}C-BPA.more » These data indicate that TCS can interact with BPA in vivo, magnifying its presence in certain tissues and serum. The data are consistent with evidence that TCS utilizes enzymes that are critical for metabolism and excretion of BPA. Further research should investigate the mechanisms through which these two chemicals interact at environmentally-relevant doses. - Highlights: • We examined whether triclosan exposure affects the distribution of oral {sup 14}C-BPA. • Radioactivity was elevated in select tissues of mice injected sc with triclosan. • In females, this effect was most pronounced in the uterus, ovaries, and lungs. • In males, this effect was most prominent in the blood serum and epididymides. • Our data accord with evidence that triclosan competes for enzymes conjugating BPA.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22439783
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 278; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANIMAL TISSUES; ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS; BLOOD SERUM; BRAIN; CARBON 14; ENZYMES; EPOXIDES; HEART; IN VIVO; LIQUIDS; LUNGS; METABOLISM; MICE; MUSCLES; OVARIES; PLASTICS; POLYCARBONATES; RADIOACTIVITY; SCINTILLATION COUNTING; UTERUS

Citation Formats

Pollock, Tyler, Tang, Brandon, and Catanzaro, Denys de, E-mail: decatanz@mcmaster.ca. Triclosan exacerbates the presence of {sup 14}C-bisphenol A in tissues of female and male mice. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2014.04.017.
Pollock, Tyler, Tang, Brandon, & Catanzaro, Denys de, E-mail: decatanz@mcmaster.ca. Triclosan exacerbates the presence of {sup 14}C-bisphenol A in tissues of female and male mice. United States. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2014.04.017.
Pollock, Tyler, Tang, Brandon, and Catanzaro, Denys de, E-mail: decatanz@mcmaster.ca. Tue . "Triclosan exacerbates the presence of {sup 14}C-bisphenol A in tissues of female and male mice". United States. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2014.04.017.
@article{osti_22439783,
title = {Triclosan exacerbates the presence of {sup 14}C-bisphenol A in tissues of female and male mice},
author = {Pollock, Tyler and Tang, Brandon and Catanzaro, Denys de, E-mail: decatanz@mcmaster.ca},
abstractNote = {Current human generations are commonly exposed to both triclosan (TCS), an antimicrobial agent, and bisphenol A (BPA), the monomer of polycarbonate plastics and epoxies. Both are readily absorbed into circulation and found distributed among diverse tissues. Potential interactions between TCS and BPA are largely unstudied. We investigated whether TCS exposure affects the distribution of ingested {sup 14}C-BPA in select tissues. CF-1 mice were each subcutaneously injected with TCS then orally administered 50 μg/kg {sup 14}C-BPA. Females received 0, 0.2, 0.6, 1, 2, or 18 mg TCS (equivalent respectively to 0, 6.3, 16.9, 30.1, 60.5, and 558.9 mg/kg). Males received 0, 0.2, 2, or 18 mg TCS (equivalent respectively to 0, 5.3, 53.4, and 415.0 mg/kg). Levels of radioactivity were measured through liquid scintillation counting in blood serum and brain, reproductive, and other tissues. Significantly elevated levels of radioactivity were observed following combined TCS and {sup 14}C-BPA administration, with minimally effective TCS doses being tissue-dependent (Females: lungs, 0.6 mg; uterus, 1 mg; heart, muscle, ovaries, and serum, 18 mg. Males: serum, 0.2 mg; epididymides, 2 mg). Subsequently, we found that 2 or 6 mg TCS increased radioactivity in the ovaries and serum of females orally given only 5 μg/kg {sup 14}C-BPA. These data indicate that TCS can interact with BPA in vivo, magnifying its presence in certain tissues and serum. The data are consistent with evidence that TCS utilizes enzymes that are critical for metabolism and excretion of BPA. Further research should investigate the mechanisms through which these two chemicals interact at environmentally-relevant doses. - Highlights: • We examined whether triclosan exposure affects the distribution of oral {sup 14}C-BPA. • Radioactivity was elevated in select tissues of mice injected sc with triclosan. • In females, this effect was most pronounced in the uterus, ovaries, and lungs. • In males, this effect was most prominent in the blood serum and epididymides. • Our data accord with evidence that triclosan competes for enzymes conjugating BPA.},
doi = {10.1016/J.TAAP.2014.04.017},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 2,
volume = 278,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
  • People are routinely exposed to the antimicrobial preservatives butyl paraben (BP) and propyl paraben (PP), as well as the monomer of polycarbonate plastics, bisphenol A (BPA). These chemicals are reliably detected in human urine and potentially interact. We investigated whether BP or PP exposure can modulate the concentrations of {sup 14}C-BPA and 17β-estradiol (E{sub 2}). Female and male CF1 mice were each given a subcutaneous injection of oil containing 0 (vehicle), 1, 3, or 9 mg BP or PP, then given a dietary supplement containing 50 μg/kg {sup 14}C-BPA. Radioactivity was measured in tissues through liquid scintillation counting. Significantly elevatedmore » {sup 14}C-BPA concentrations were observed following BP treatment in blood serum of both sexes, as well as the lungs, uterus, and ovaries of females and the testes and epididymides of males. Treatment with PP significantly elevated {sup 14}C-BPA concentrations in the uterus only. In another experiment, female and male CF1 mice were each injected with vehicle, 3 mg BP, or 3 mg PP, and E{sub 2} was measured in urine 2–12 h later. Whereas PP did not affect E{sub 2}, BP significantly elevated E{sub 2} 6–10 h after injection in females and 8 h after injection in males. These data indicate that BP and PP can alter the pharmacokinetics of BPA in vivo, and that BP can modulate E{sub 2} concentrations. These results are consistent with evidence that parabens inhibit enzymes that are critical for BPA and E{sub 2} metabolism, and demonstrate the importance of considering concurrent exposure to multiple chemicals when determining regulatory exposure limits. - Highlights: • We studied whether paraben exposure affects the distribution of oral {sup 14}C-BPA. • Elevated {sup 14}C–BPA was observed in mice given butyl or propyl paraben. • We also studied whether paraben exposure affects natural E{sub 2} levels in urine. • Elevated E{sub 2} was observed in mice given butyl, but not propyl, paraben. • Parabens may compete for enzymes that are critical for BPA and E{sub 2} metabolism.« less
  • Male and 13.5- and 17.5-day pregnant Swiss-Webster mice were administered 120 mg/kg (2,3-14C)acrylamide orally. The male mice were frozen 0.33, 1, 3, 9, 24, 72, and 216 hr later, and the pregnant mice at each gestational period were frozen at 3 and 24 hr. Whole-body autoradiographs from the male mice at early time intervals revealed accumulation of radioactivity in the contents of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, pancreas, testis, brain and gallbladder, and epithelia of oral cavity, esophagus, and bronchi. The distribution appears to be similar in the male and pregnant mice. Absorption from the stomach was virtually complete by 3more » hr; renal and hepatic elimination was essentially complete at 24 hr. Radioactivity in the male reproductive tract appeared in the parenchyma of the testis at 1 hr, moved to the seminiferous tubules and head of the epididymis at 9 hr, and by 9 days remained only in the tail of the epididymis and the crypts of the epithelium of the glans penis. This movement parallels that of spermatids. The 13.5-day fetuses were uniformly labeled except for a slightly increased uptake in fetal brain. The distribution of radioactivity in the 17.5-day fetal tissues resembled that in maternal tissues; the remarkable exception was an intense accumulation in fetal skin. This study indicates that acrylamide is efficiently absorbed from the stomach and eliminated by the liver, kidney, and possibly the pancreas. A previously unrecognized affinity of acrylamide or a metabolic product was demonstrated for fetal skin in late gestation and for adult epithelia of oral cavity, esophagus, forestomach, and bronchi. Also, acrylamide or a metabolite appears to bind to spermatids at a specific stage near maturation.« less
  • The tissue distribution of radioactivity in male RFM and BALB/c mice was investigated following a single dose of (/sup 14/C)-labeled diethylnitrosamine (DEN). The radiolabel was associated with all the subcellular fractions, and the majority of the radioactivity was located in the cytosol fraction. The majority of the radiolabel was usually eliminated from the fractions within 16-24 hrs after (/sup 14/C)DEN administration.
  • The application of 2-amino-4-hydroxy-6-(1', 2', 3'-trihydroxybutyl)-5, 6, 7, 8-tetrahydropteridine in a single dose (0.5 or 2.5 mg/mouse) after x- or / sup 60/Co irradiation in midlethal doses was followed by an increase in the number of 30 days survivors. The effect was more pronounced in male mice and after x irradiation than in female mice and after /sup 60/Co irradiation. (auth)
  • The dose-response characteristics of several glucose-utilizing tissues (brain, heart, white adipose tissue, brown adipose tissue, and quadriceps muscle) to a single injection of insulin have been compared in control mice and mice made obese with a single injection of gold thioglucose (GTG). Tissue content of (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose 6-phosphate and blood disappearance rate of (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) were measured at nine different insulin doses and used to calculate rates of 2-DG uptake and phosphorylation in tissues from control and obese mice. The insulin sensitivity of tissues reflected in the ED50 of insulin response varied widely, and brown adipose tissue was themore » most insulin-sensitive tissue studied. In GTG-obese mice, heart, quadriceps, and brown adipose tissue were insulin resistant (demonstrated by increased ED50), whereas in white adipose tissue, 2-DG phosphorylation was more sensitive to insulin. Brain 2-DG phosphorylation was insulin independent in control and obese animals. The largest decrease in insulin sensitivity in GTG-obese mice was observed in brown adipose tissue. The loss of diet-induced thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue as a result of the hypothalamic lesion in GTG-obese mice could be a major cause of insulin resistance in brown adipose tissue. Because brown adipose tissue can make a major contribution to whole-body glucose utilization, insulin resistance in this tissue may have a significant effect on whole-animal glucose homeostasis in GTG-obese mice.« less