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Title: Nuclear Science References Database

Abstract

The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr)

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)
  2. Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia)
  3. Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4M1 (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22436747
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nuclear Data Sheets; Journal Volume: 120; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; IAEA; INFORMATION; INFORMATION SYSTEMS; NUCLEAR DECAY; NUCLEAR PHYSICS; NUCLEAR STRUCTURE

Citation Formats

Pritychenko, B., E-mail: pritychenko@bnl.gov, Běták, E., Singh, B., and Totans, J.. Nuclear Science References Database. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/J.NDS.2014.07.070.
Pritychenko, B., E-mail: pritychenko@bnl.gov, Běták, E., Singh, B., & Totans, J.. Nuclear Science References Database. United States. doi:10.1016/J.NDS.2014.07.070.
Pritychenko, B., E-mail: pritychenko@bnl.gov, Běták, E., Singh, B., and Totans, J.. 2014. "Nuclear Science References Database". United States. doi:10.1016/J.NDS.2014.07.070.
@article{osti_22436747,
title = {Nuclear Science References Database},
author = {Pritychenko, B., E-mail: pritychenko@bnl.gov and Běták, E. and Singh, B. and Totans, J.},
abstractNote = {The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr)},
doi = {10.1016/J.NDS.2014.07.070},
journal = {Nuclear Data Sheets},
number = ,
volume = 120,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 6
}
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