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Title: Capillary plasma jet: A low volume plasma source for life science applications

Abstract

In this letter, we present results from multispectroscopic analysis of protein films, after exposure to a peculiar plasma source, i.e., the capillary plasma jet. This plasma source is able to generate very small pulsed plasma volumes, in kilohertz range, with characteristic dimensions smaller than 1 mm. This leads to specific microscale generation and transport of all plasma species. Plasma diagnosis was realized using general electrical and optical methods. Depending on power level and exposure duration, this miniature plasma jet can induce controllable modifications to soft matter targets. Detailed discussions on protein film oxidation and chemical etching are supported by results from absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and microscopy techniques. Further exploitation of principles presented here may consolidate research interests involving plasmas in biotechnologies and plasma medicine, especially in patterning technologies, modified biomolecule arrays, and local chemical functionalization.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Faculty of Physics, Iasi Plasma Advanced Research Center (IPARC), Bd. Carol I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania)
  2. Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22420285
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ETCHING; FILMS; MICROSCOPY; OXIDATION; PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS; PLASMA JETS; PROTEINS; X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Topala, I., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp, and Nagatsu, M., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp. Capillary plasma jet: A low volume plasma source for life science applications. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4907349.
Topala, I., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp, & Nagatsu, M., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp. Capillary plasma jet: A low volume plasma source for life science applications. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4907349.
Topala, I., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp, and Nagatsu, M., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp. Mon . "Capillary plasma jet: A low volume plasma source for life science applications". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4907349.
@article{osti_22420285,
title = {Capillary plasma jet: A low volume plasma source for life science applications},
author = {Topala, I., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp and Nagatsu, M., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp},
abstractNote = {In this letter, we present results from multispectroscopic analysis of protein films, after exposure to a peculiar plasma source, i.e., the capillary plasma jet. This plasma source is able to generate very small pulsed plasma volumes, in kilohertz range, with characteristic dimensions smaller than 1 mm. This leads to specific microscale generation and transport of all plasma species. Plasma diagnosis was realized using general electrical and optical methods. Depending on power level and exposure duration, this miniature plasma jet can induce controllable modifications to soft matter targets. Detailed discussions on protein film oxidation and chemical etching are supported by results from absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and microscopy techniques. Further exploitation of principles presented here may consolidate research interests involving plasmas in biotechnologies and plasma medicine, especially in patterning technologies, modified biomolecule arrays, and local chemical functionalization.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4907349},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 5,
volume = 106,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Mon Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}
  • The optical and electrophysical characteristics of the nonequilibrium low-temperature plasma formed by a low-current nonsteady-state plasmatron are experimentally investigated in the present work. It is demonstrated that experimental data on the optical diagnostics of the plasma jet can provide a basis for the construction of a self-consistent physical and mathematical plasma model and for the creation of plasma sources with controllable electrophysical parameters intended for the generation of the required concentration of active particles. Results of spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma of the low-current nonsteady-state plasmatron confirm that the given source is efficient for the generation of charged particles and short-wavelengthmore » radiation—important plasma components for biomedical problems of an increase in the efficiency of treatment of biological tissues by charged particles. Measurement of the spatial distribution of the plasma jet potential by the probe method has demonstrated that a negative space charge is formed in the plasma jet possibly due to the formation of electronegative oxygen ions.« less
  • The properties of a plasma jet generated in low-pressure pulsed capillary discharge have been measured. The discharge operates in a 5 cm long and 1.6-mm-inner diameter alumina capillary, with argon in a pressure range between 20 and 100 Torr, at 11-kV applied voltage. The temporal and spatial evolutions of the plasma density in the plasma jets are measured close to the capillary end with a Michelson interferometry based on a 10-ns-pulse Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The maximum on-axis plasma density is of the order of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} at the capillary output, with an {approx}6-ns rise time to reachmore » a significative electron density. At lower pressure the plasma density is seen to decay in a time scale of 50 ns and over an axial distance of the order of 0.5 mm, whereas at the higher pressure, 100 Torr, it remains more or less stationary for up to {approx}300 ns. The discharge is characterized by a high efficiency in energy coupling, as the local-stored energy is much less than 1 J per pulse.« less
  • In this article, the authors compare the thickness profiles and OH content of SiO{sub 2} films deposited using capillary jet injection of silane in a high density plasma chemical vapor deposition (HDP CVD) system with the results of phenomenological modeling using direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) gas flow calculations. A tube with an internal diameter of 1 mm is located vertically at 3 cm in front of the substrate surface and is used for the injection of the silane. The deposition plasma is characterized using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS). Studying the thickness-normalized OHmore » absorption in the deposited film at various points on the substrate, the authors gain insight into the contribution of the water flux to the OH content in the deposited SiO{sub 2} film. Gas flow simulations using the DSMC technique are used to study the fluxes of the species onto the substrate plane. From the results the authors conclude that (i) the flux of the H{sub 2}O onto the substrate holder is uniform, while the SiH{sub 4} flux varies considerably along the substrate holder, which leads to a lower level of hydroxyl incorporated into the deposited film in regions of high deposition rate; (ii) HDP CVD systems cannot be considered as well mixed when using SiH{sub 4} because its reaction products have high sticking coefficients and the ground-state molecules have the possibility to be consumed on the surface through reactions with oxygen radicals and ions when depositing SiO{sub 2}; (iii) the primary beamlike flux of undissociated SiH{sub 4} onto the substrate surface has an important influence on the film's deposition rate; and (iv) the SiH{sub 4} reactive sticking coefficient is estimated to be between 0.01 and 0.03.« less
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  • Background: Applications in biomedical science and life science produce large data sets using increasingly powerful imaging devices and computer simulations. It is becoming increasingly difficult for scientists to explore and analyze these data using traditional tools. Interactive data processing and visualization tools can support scientists to overcome these limitations. Results: We show that new data processing tools and visualization systems can be used successfully in biomedical and life science applications. We present an adaptive high-resolution display system suitable for biomedical image data, algorithms for analyzing and visualization protein surfaces and retinal optical coherence tomography data, and visualization tools for 3Dmore » gene expression data. Conclusion: We demonstrated that interactive processing and visualization methods and systems can support scientists in a variety of biomedical and life science application areas concerned with massive data analysis.« less