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Title: Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

Abstract

Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4]
  1. Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic)
  2. St. Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation)
  3. Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic)
  4. (Czech Republic)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22420281
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BACTERIA; EOSIN; HELIUM; HEMATOXYLIN; PLASMA; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SKIN; STEM CELLS; STRAINS

Citation Formats

Lunov, O., E-mail: lunov@fzu.cz, Churpita, O., Zablotskii, V., Jäger, A., Dejneka, A., Deyneka, I. G., Meshkovskii, I. K., Syková, E., Kubinová, Š., and Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4907624.
Lunov, O., E-mail: lunov@fzu.cz, Churpita, O., Zablotskii, V., Jäger, A., Dejneka, A., Deyneka, I. G., Meshkovskii, I. K., Syková, E., Kubinová, Š., & Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4907624.
Lunov, O., E-mail: lunov@fzu.cz, Churpita, O., Zablotskii, V., Jäger, A., Dejneka, A., Deyneka, I. G., Meshkovskii, I. K., Syková, E., Kubinová, Š., and Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220. 2015. "Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4907624.
@article{osti_22420281,
title = {Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations},
author = {Lunov, O., E-mail: lunov@fzu.cz and Churpita, O. and Zablotskii, V. and Jäger, A. and Dejneka, A. and Deyneka, I. G. and Meshkovskii, I. K. and Syková, E. and Kubinová, Š. and Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220},
abstractNote = {Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4907624},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 5,
volume = 106,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 2
}
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