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Title: Local strain effect on the band gap engineering of graphene by a first-principles study

Abstract

We have systematically investigated the effect of local strain on electronic properties of graphene by first-principles calculations. Two major types of local strain, oriented along the zigzag and the armchair directions, have been studied. We find that local strain with a proper range and strength along the zigzag direction results in opening of significant band gaps in graphene, on the order of 10{sup −1 }eV; whereas, local strain along the armchair direction cannot open a significant band gap in graphene. Our results show that appropriate local strain can effectively open and tune the band gap in graphene; therefore, the electronic and transport properties of graphene can also be modified.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)
  2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1509 University Avenue Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)
  3. Hunan Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Energy Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22420269
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; CHARGE TRANSPORT; ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE; GRAPHENE; STRAINS

Citation Formats

Gui, Gui, Booske, John, Ma, Zhenqiang, E-mail: jxzhong@xtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu, Morgan, Dane, and Zhong, Jianxin, E-mail: jxzhong@xtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu. Local strain effect on the band gap engineering of graphene by a first-principles study. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4907410.
Gui, Gui, Booske, John, Ma, Zhenqiang, E-mail: jxzhong@xtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu, Morgan, Dane, & Zhong, Jianxin, E-mail: jxzhong@xtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu. Local strain effect on the band gap engineering of graphene by a first-principles study. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4907410.
Gui, Gui, Booske, John, Ma, Zhenqiang, E-mail: jxzhong@xtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu, Morgan, Dane, and Zhong, Jianxin, E-mail: jxzhong@xtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu. Mon . "Local strain effect on the band gap engineering of graphene by a first-principles study". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4907410.
@article{osti_22420269,
title = {Local strain effect on the band gap engineering of graphene by a first-principles study},
author = {Gui, Gui and Booske, John and Ma, Zhenqiang, E-mail: jxzhong@xtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu and Morgan, Dane and Zhong, Jianxin, E-mail: jxzhong@xtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu},
abstractNote = {We have systematically investigated the effect of local strain on electronic properties of graphene by first-principles calculations. Two major types of local strain, oriented along the zigzag and the armchair directions, have been studied. We find that local strain with a proper range and strength along the zigzag direction results in opening of significant band gaps in graphene, on the order of 10{sup −1 }eV; whereas, local strain along the armchair direction cannot open a significant band gap in graphene. Our results show that appropriate local strain can effectively open and tune the band gap in graphene; therefore, the electronic and transport properties of graphene can also be modified.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4907410},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 5,
volume = 106,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Mon Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}
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