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Title: Mitochondrial DNA disease—molecular insights and potential routes to a cure

Abstract

Mitochondrial DNA diseases are common neurological conditions caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome or nuclear genes responsible for its maintenance. Current treatments for these disorders are focussed on the management of the symptoms, rather than the correction of biochemical defects caused by the mutation. This review focuses on the molecular effects of mutations, the symptoms they cause and current work focusing on the development of targeted treatments for mitochondrial DNA disease. - Highlights: • We discuss several common disease causing mtDNA mutations. • We highlight recent work linking pathogenicity to deletion size and heteroplasmy. • We discuss recent advances in the development of targeted mtDNA disease treatments.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22416908
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Experimental Cell Research; Journal Volume: 325; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; DISEASES; DNA; GENES; MITOCHONDRIA; MUTATIONS; NUCLEASES; SYMPTOMS; ZINC

Citation Formats

Russell, Oliver, and Turnbull, Doug, E-mail: doug.turnbull@newcastle.ac.uk. Mitochondrial DNA disease—molecular insights and potential routes to a cure. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2014.03.012.
Russell, Oliver, & Turnbull, Doug, E-mail: doug.turnbull@newcastle.ac.uk. Mitochondrial DNA disease—molecular insights and potential routes to a cure. United States. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2014.03.012.
Russell, Oliver, and Turnbull, Doug, E-mail: doug.turnbull@newcastle.ac.uk. Tue . "Mitochondrial DNA disease—molecular insights and potential routes to a cure". United States. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2014.03.012.
@article{osti_22416908,
title = {Mitochondrial DNA disease—molecular insights and potential routes to a cure},
author = {Russell, Oliver and Turnbull, Doug, E-mail: doug.turnbull@newcastle.ac.uk},
abstractNote = {Mitochondrial DNA diseases are common neurological conditions caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome or nuclear genes responsible for its maintenance. Current treatments for these disorders are focussed on the management of the symptoms, rather than the correction of biochemical defects caused by the mutation. This review focuses on the molecular effects of mutations, the symptoms they cause and current work focusing on the development of targeted treatments for mitochondrial DNA disease. - Highlights: • We discuss several common disease causing mtDNA mutations. • We highlight recent work linking pathogenicity to deletion size and heteroplasmy. • We discuss recent advances in the development of targeted mtDNA disease treatments.},
doi = {10.1016/J.YEXCR.2014.03.012},
journal = {Experimental Cell Research},
number = 1,
volume = 325,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
  • Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD) were sought by restriction endonuclease analysis in a cohort of 71 late-onset Caucasian patients. A tRNA[sup Gln] gene variant at nucleotide pair (np) 4336 that altered a moderately conserved nucleotide was present in 9/173 (5.2%) of the patients surveyed but in only 0.7% of the general Caucasian controls. One of these patients harbored an additional novel 12S rRNA 5-nucleotide insertion at np 956-965, while a second had a missense variant at np 3397 that converted a highly conserved methionine to a valine. This latter mutation was alsomore » found in an independent AD + PD patient, as was a heteroplasmic 16S rRNA variant at np 3196. Additional studies will be required to determine the significance, if any, of these mutations. 122 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.« less
  • Highlights: {yields} We impaired TK2 expression in Ost TK1{sup -} cells via siRNA-mediated interference (TK2{sup -}). {yields} TK2 impairment caused severe mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion in quiescent cells. {yields} Despite mtDNA depletion, TK2{sup -} cells show high cytochrome oxidase activity. {yields} Depletion of mtDNA occurs without imbalance in the mitochondrial dNTP pool. {yields} Nuclear-encoded ENT1, DNA-pol {gamma}, TFAM and TP gene expression is lowered in TK2{sup -} cells. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome comprises a clinically heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by reductions of the mtDNA abundance, without associated point mutations or rearrangements. We have developed themore » first in vitro model to study of mtDNA depletion due to reduced mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 gene (TK2) expression in order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in mtDNA depletion syndrome due to TK2 mutations. Small interfering RNA targeting TK2 mRNA was used to decrease TK2 expression in Ost TK1{sup -} cells, a cell line devoid of endogenous thymidine kinase 1 (TK1). Stable TK2-deficient cell lines showed a reduction of TK2 levels close to 80%. In quiescent conditions, TK2-deficient cells showed severe mtDNA depletion, also close to 80% the control levels. However, TK2-deficient clones showed increased cytochrome c oxidase activity, higher cytochrome c oxidase subunit I transcript levels and higher subunit II protein expression respect to control cells. No alterations of the deoxynucleotide pools were found, whereas a reduction in the expression of genes involved in nucleoside/nucleotide homeostasis (human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1, thymidine phosphorylase) and mtDNA maintenance (DNA-polymerase {gamma}, mitochondrial transcription factor A) was observed. Our findings highlight the importance of cellular compensatory mechanisms that enhance the expression of respiratory components to ensure respiratory activity despite profound depletion in mtDNA levels.« less
  • A pedigree was characterized in which PD and deafness is expressed along the maternal lineage. The proband is 74 years old and has PD. Her mother and 3 of 7 siblings have PD and a maternal lineage cousin may have early signs of PD. The proband`s mother, a sibling, and all four of her daughters have premature deafness. Since manifestations of PD begin after 50 years of age, the 30-40 year old daughters have not reached an age where extrapyramidal symptoms are likely to appear. Although all 4 daughters have premature deafness, one daughter experienced a rapid reduction of hermore » hearing after receiving a short course during childhood of the aminoglycoside streptomycin. Muscle biopsies from the proband who has PD and 3 daughters with deafness revealed normal histology. Oxidative phosphorylation biochemistry showed Complex I and IV defects in the proband and 2 daughters and a Complex I defect in the other daughter. The proband`s mtDNA was sequenced. Of the nucleotide variants observed, the only significant nucleotide change was a homoplasmic A-to-G point mutation in the 12S rRNA gene at position 1555 of the mtDNA. This site is homologous to the E. coli aminoglycoside binding site and has been found in a large Arab-Israeli pedigree with spontaneously occurring deafness and three Chinese pedigrees with aminoglycoside-induced deafness. Hence, this family shows a direct link between PD, deafness, Complex I and IV defects, and a mutation in a gene that functions in mitochondrial protein synthesis. Furthermore, the interaction between aminoglycosides and the mtDNA in a manner that augments the pathogenic effects of this mutation provides an excellent example of how environmental toxins and mtDNA mutations can interact to give a spectrum of clinical presentations.« less
  • The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence was determined on 3 patients with Alzheimer`s disease (AD) exhibiting AD plus Parkinson`s disease (PD) neuropathologic changes and one patient with PD. Patient mtDNA sequences were compared to the standard Cambridge sequence to identify base changes. In the first AD + PD patient, 2 of the 15 nucleotide substitutions may contribute to the neuropathology, a nucleotide pair (np) 4336 transition in the tRNA{sup Gln} gene found 7.4 times more frequently in patients than in controls, and a unique np 721 transition in the 12S rRNA gene which was not found in 70 other patients ormore » 905 controls. In the second AD + PD patient, 27 nucleotide substitutions were detected, including an np 3397 transition in the ND1 gene which converts a conserved methionine to a valine. In the third AD + PD patient, 2 polymorphic base substitutions frequently found at increased frequency in Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy patients were observed, an np 4216 transition in ND1 and an np 13708 transition in the ND5 gene. For the PD patient, 2 novel variants were observed among 25 base substitutions, an np 1709 substitution in the 16S rRNA gene and an np 15851 missense mutation in the cytb gene. Further studies will be required to demonstrate a casual role for these base substitutions in neurodegenerative disease. 68 refs., 2 tabs.« less
  • Human mitochondrial DNA polymerase (Pol {gamma}) is the sole replicase in mitochondria. Pol {gamma} is vulnerable to nonselective antiretroviral drugs and is increasingly associated with mutations found in patients with mitochondriopathies. We determined crystal structures of the human heterotrimeric Pol {gamma} holoenzyme and, separately, a variant of its processivity factor, Pol {gamma}B. The holoenzyme structure reveals an unexpected assembly of the mitochondrial DNA replicase where the catalytic subunit Pol {gamma}A interacts with its processivity factor primarily via a domain that is absent in all other DNA polymerases. This domain provides a structural module for supporting both the intrinsic processivity ofmore » the catalytic subunit alone and the enhanced processivity of holoenzyme. The Pol {gamma} structure also provides a context for interpreting the phenotypes of disease-related mutations in the polymerase and establishes a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of toxicity of anti-retroviral drugs targeting HIV reverse transcriptase.« less