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Title: WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response

Abstract

Highlights: • The UV sensitivity of POLH{sup −/−} cells was suppressed by disruption of WRNIP1. • In WRNIP1{sup −/−/−}/POLH{sup −/−} cells, mutation frequencies and SCE after irradiation reduced. • WRNIP1 defect recovered rate of fork progression after irradiation in POLH{sup −/−} cells. • WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the translesion DNA synthesis pathway. - Abstract: WRNIP1 (WRN-interacting protein 1) was first identified as a factor that interacts with WRN, the protein that is defective in Werner syndrome (WS). WRNIP1 associates with DNA polymerase η (Polη), but the biological significance of this interaction remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the functional interaction between WRNIP1 and Polη by generating knockouts of both genes in DT40 chicken cells. Disruption of WRNIP1 in Polη-disrupted (POLH{sup −/−}) cells suppressed the phenotypes associated with the loss of Polη: sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV), delayed repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), elevated frequency of mutation, elevated levels of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and reduced rate of fork progression after UV irradiation. These results suggest that WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the response to UV irradiation.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Musashino University, 1-1-20 Shinmachi, Nishitokyo-shi, Tokyo 202-8585 (Japan)
  2. Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, Funabashi-shi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan)
  3. Department of Biochemistry, Tohoku Pharmaceutical University, 4-4-1 Komatsushima, Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 981-8558 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22416738
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 452; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CHICKENS; DNA; DNA DAMAGES; GENES; IRRADIATION; MUTATION FREQUENCY; PHENOTYPE; PROTEINS; PYRIMIDINE DIMERS; REPAIR; SENSITIVITY; SISTER CHROMATID EXCHANGES; SYNTHESIS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Yoshimura, Akari, E-mail: akari_yo@stu.musashino-u.ac.jp, Kobayashi, Yume, Tada, Shusuke, Seki, Masayuki, and Enomoto, Takemi. WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2014.08.043.
Yoshimura, Akari, E-mail: akari_yo@stu.musashino-u.ac.jp, Kobayashi, Yume, Tada, Shusuke, Seki, Masayuki, & Enomoto, Takemi. WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2014.08.043.
Yoshimura, Akari, E-mail: akari_yo@stu.musashino-u.ac.jp, Kobayashi, Yume, Tada, Shusuke, Seki, Masayuki, and Enomoto, Takemi. 2014. "WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2014.08.043.
@article{osti_22416738,
title = {WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response},
author = {Yoshimura, Akari, E-mail: akari_yo@stu.musashino-u.ac.jp and Kobayashi, Yume and Tada, Shusuke and Seki, Masayuki and Enomoto, Takemi},
abstractNote = {Highlights: • The UV sensitivity of POLH{sup −/−} cells was suppressed by disruption of WRNIP1. • In WRNIP1{sup −/−/−}/POLH{sup −/−} cells, mutation frequencies and SCE after irradiation reduced. • WRNIP1 defect recovered rate of fork progression after irradiation in POLH{sup −/−} cells. • WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the translesion DNA synthesis pathway. - Abstract: WRNIP1 (WRN-interacting protein 1) was first identified as a factor that interacts with WRN, the protein that is defective in Werner syndrome (WS). WRNIP1 associates with DNA polymerase η (Polη), but the biological significance of this interaction remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the functional interaction between WRNIP1 and Polη by generating knockouts of both genes in DT40 chicken cells. Disruption of WRNIP1 in Polη-disrupted (POLH{sup −/−}) cells suppressed the phenotypes associated with the loss of Polη: sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV), delayed repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), elevated frequency of mutation, elevated levels of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and reduced rate of fork progression after UV irradiation. These results suggest that WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the response to UV irradiation.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2014.08.043},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 1,
volume = 452,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 9
}
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