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Title: Inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion of B16-F10 melanoma cells by α-mangostin

Abstract

Highlights: • We studied the anticancer potential of a new emerging molecule, α-mangostin (α-M). • We provide first evidences on the effects of α-M on transglutaminase activity. • We deeply examined the antimetastatic effects of α-M through many in vitro assays. • Proteomic analysis revealed that α-M promotes a reorganization at cellular level. - Abstract: In this study, we have evaluated the potential antineoplastic effects of α-mangostin (α-M), the most representative xanthone in Garcinia mangostana pericarp, on melanoma cell lines. This xanthone markedly inhibits the proliferation of high-metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells. Furthermore, by deeply analyzing which steps in the metastatic process are influenced by xanthone it was observed that α-M strongly interferes with homotypic aggregation, adhesion, plasticity and invasion ability of B16-F10 cells, probably by the observed reduction of metalloproteinase-9 activity. The antiproliferative and antimetastatic properties of α-M have been established in human SK-MEL-28 and A375 melanoma cells. In order to identify pathways potentially involved in the antineoplastic properties of α-M, a comparative mass spectrometry proteomic approach was employed. These findings may improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effects of α-M on melanoma.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]; ; ;  [1];  [1];  [4]
  1. Department of Biology, University “Tor Vergata”, Rome (Italy)
  2. Department of Hematology, Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome (Italy)
  3. Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)
  4. (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22416694
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 450; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ADHESION; AGGLOMERATION; CELL PROLIFERATION; DRUGS; HUMAN POPULATIONS; IN VITRO; INHIBITION; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; MELANOMAS; METASTASES; MOLECULES; REDUCTION; TUMOR CELLS

Citation Formats

Beninati, Simone, E-mail: beninati@bio.uniroma2.it, Oliverio, Serafina, Cordella, Martina, Rossi, Stefania, Senatore, Cinzia, Liguori, Immacolata, Lentini, Alessandro, Piredda, Lucia, Tabolacci, Claudio, and Department of Hematology, Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome. Inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion of B16-F10 melanoma cells by α-mangostin. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2014.07.031.
Beninati, Simone, E-mail: beninati@bio.uniroma2.it, Oliverio, Serafina, Cordella, Martina, Rossi, Stefania, Senatore, Cinzia, Liguori, Immacolata, Lentini, Alessandro, Piredda, Lucia, Tabolacci, Claudio, & Department of Hematology, Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome. Inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion of B16-F10 melanoma cells by α-mangostin. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2014.07.031.
Beninati, Simone, E-mail: beninati@bio.uniroma2.it, Oliverio, Serafina, Cordella, Martina, Rossi, Stefania, Senatore, Cinzia, Liguori, Immacolata, Lentini, Alessandro, Piredda, Lucia, Tabolacci, Claudio, and Department of Hematology, Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome. Fri . "Inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion of B16-F10 melanoma cells by α-mangostin". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2014.07.031.
@article{osti_22416694,
title = {Inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion of B16-F10 melanoma cells by α-mangostin},
author = {Beninati, Simone, E-mail: beninati@bio.uniroma2.it and Oliverio, Serafina and Cordella, Martina and Rossi, Stefania and Senatore, Cinzia and Liguori, Immacolata and Lentini, Alessandro and Piredda, Lucia and Tabolacci, Claudio and Department of Hematology, Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome},
abstractNote = {Highlights: • We studied the anticancer potential of a new emerging molecule, α-mangostin (α-M). • We provide first evidences on the effects of α-M on transglutaminase activity. • We deeply examined the antimetastatic effects of α-M through many in vitro assays. • Proteomic analysis revealed that α-M promotes a reorganization at cellular level. - Abstract: In this study, we have evaluated the potential antineoplastic effects of α-mangostin (α-M), the most representative xanthone in Garcinia mangostana pericarp, on melanoma cell lines. This xanthone markedly inhibits the proliferation of high-metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells. Furthermore, by deeply analyzing which steps in the metastatic process are influenced by xanthone it was observed that α-M strongly interferes with homotypic aggregation, adhesion, plasticity and invasion ability of B16-F10 cells, probably by the observed reduction of metalloproteinase-9 activity. The antiproliferative and antimetastatic properties of α-M have been established in human SK-MEL-28 and A375 melanoma cells. In order to identify pathways potentially involved in the antineoplastic properties of α-M, a comparative mass spectrometry proteomic approach was employed. These findings may improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effects of α-M on melanoma.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2014.07.031},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 4,
volume = 450,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 08 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 08 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
  • Considering that stimulation of melanogenesis may lead to alterations of cellular responses, besides melanin production, our main goal was to study the cellular effects of melanogenesis stimulation of B16-F10 melanoma cells. Our results show increased levels of the reactive oxygen species after 15 h of melanogenesis stimulation. Following 48 h of melanogenesis stimulation, proliferation was inhibited (by induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase) and the expression levels of p21 mRNA were increased. In addition, melanogenesis stimulation did not induce cellular senescence. Proteomic analysis demonstrated the involvement of proteins from other pathways besides those related to the cellmore » cycle, including protein disulfide isomerase A3, heat-shock protein 70, and fructose biphosphate aldolase A (all up-regulated), and lactate dehydrogenase (down-regulated). In RT-qPCR experiments, the levels of pyruvate kinase M2 mRNA dropped, whereas the levels of ATP synthase (beta-F1) mRNA increased. These data indicate that melanogenesis stimulation of B16-F10 cells leads to alterations in metabolism and cell cycle progression that may contribute to an induction of cell quiescence, which may provide a mechanism of resistance against cellular injury promoted by melanin synthesis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melanogenesis stimulation by L-tyrosine+NH{sub 4}Cl in B16-F10 melanoma cells increases ROS levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melanogenesis inhibits cell proliferation, and induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteomic analysis showed alterations in proteins of the cell cycle and glucose metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RT-qPCR analysis confirmed alterations of metabolic targets after melanogenesis stimulation.« less
  • Melanoma is a rare and aggressive skin tumor; the survival of patients diagnosed late is fairly low. This high mortality rate is due to the characteristics of the cells that allow them to be resistant to radiotherapy and conventional chemotherapy, besides of being able to evade the immune system. Melanin, the pigment responsible for skin, hair and eye color, seems to be involved in this resistance. The main function of melanin is to protect the cells against ultraviolet (UV) light by absorbing this radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging. But this pigment may have also a role as photosensitizer,more » because when it is irradiated with UVA light (320-400 nm), the generation of ROS was detected. Besides, the melanogenesis stimulation on B16-F10 cells resulted in cell cycle arrest, induction of a quiescent state, change in the expression of several proteins and alterations on ADP/ATP ratio. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of melanogenesis stimulation in mitochondrial function of B16-F10 melanoma cells. Therefore, we analyzed cells respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}) and mitochondria mass in B16-F10 melanoma cells stimulated with 0.4 mM L-tyrosine and 10 mM NH{sub 4}Cl. Our results showed that the induction of melanin synthesis was able to reduce significantly the oxygen consumption after 48 h of stimulation, without changes of mitochondrial membrane potential when compared to non-stimulated cells. Despite of respiration inhibition, the mitochondria mass was higher in cells with melanogenesis stimulation. We suggest that the stimulation in the melanin synthesis might be promoting the inhibition of electrons transport chain by some intermediate compound from the synthesis of the pigment and this effect could contribute to explain the entry in the quiescent state. - Highlights: • Melanoma pigmentation alters mitochondrial respiration. • Induction of melanin synthesis by 48 h do not change mitochondrial membrane potential. • Mitochondria mass was higher in cells with melanogenesis stimulation.« less
  • In vivo and in vitro effects of TIS21 gene on the mature T cell activation and antitumor activities were explored by employing MO5 melanoma orthograft and splenocytes isolated from the TIS21-knockout (KO) mice. Proliferation and survival of mature T cells were significantly increased in the KO than the wild type (WT) cells, indicating that TIS21 inhibits the rate of mature T cell proliferation and its survival. In MO5 melanoma orthograft model, the KO mice recruited much more CD8{sup +} T cells into the tumors at around day 14 after tumor cell injection along with reduced tumor volumes compared with themore » WT. The increased frequency of granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in splenocytes of the KO mice compared with the WT may account for antitumor-immunity of TIS21 gene in the melanoma orthograft. In contrast, reduced frequencies of CD107a{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in the splenocytes of KO mice may affect the loss of CD8{sup +} T cell infiltration in the orthograft at around day 19. These results indicate that TIS21 exhibits antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in mature T cells, and differentially affects the frequencies of granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T-cells and CD107a{sup +} CD8{sup +} T-cells, thus transiently regulating in vivo anti-tumor immunity. - Highlights: • Constitutive expression of TIS21 in splenocytes and upregulation by TCR stimulation. • Proliferation of mature T-cells in spleen of TIS21KO mice after TCR stimulation. • Inhibition of cell death in mature T-cells of TIS21KO mice compared with the wild type. • Inhibition of melanoma growth in TIS21KO mice and CD8{sup +} T cell infiltration in tumor. • Reduction of CD 107{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cells, but increased granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in TIS21KO mice.« less
  • The discovery that the regenerative properties of bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) could collaterally favor neoplastic progression has led to a great interest in the function of these cells in tumors. However, the effect of BM-MSCs on colonization, a rate-limiting step of the metastatic cascade, is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of BM-MSCs on metastatic outgrowth of B16-F10 melanoma cells. In in vitro experiments, direct co-culture assays demonstrated that BM-MSCs stimulated the proliferation of B16-F10 cells in a dose-dependent manner. For in vivo experiments, luciferase-expressing B16-F10 cells were injected through tail vein and mice weremore » subsequently treated with four systemic injections of BM-MSCs. In vivo bioluminescent imaging during 16 days demonstrated that BM-MSCs enhanced the colonization of lungs by B16-F10 cells, which correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of metastatic foci. Flow cytometry analysis of lungs demonstrated that although mice harboring B16-F10 metastases displayed more endothelial cells, CD4 T and CD8 T lymphocytes in the lungs in comparison to metastases-free mice, BM-MSCs did not alter the number of these cells. Interestingly, BM-MSCs inoculation resulted in a 2-fold increase in the number of CD11b{sup +} myeloid cells in the lungs of melanoma-bearing animals, a cell population previously described to organize “premetastatic niches” in experimental models. These findings indicate that BM-MSCs provide support to B16-F10 cells to overcome the constraints that limit metastatic outgrowth and that these effects might involve the interplay between BM-MSCs, CD11b{sup +} myeloid cells and tumor cells. - Highlights: • BM-MSCs enhanced B16-F10 proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. • BM-MSCs facilitated lung colonization by B16-F10 melanoma cells. • BM-MSCs administration did not alter the number of endothelial cells and T lymphocytes in the lungs. • BM-MSCs enhanced the recruitment of CD11b{sup +} myeloid cells during tumor colonization.« less
  • Oligosaccharide moieties of cell-surface glycoconjugates are thought to be involved in recognition events associated with tumor metastasis and invasion. Using swainsonine (SW), an inhibitor of Golgi ..cap alpha..-mannosidase II that results in the formation of hybrid-type oligosaccharides on N-linked glycoproteins, the authors have tested the hypothesis that specific glycan structures are required for pulmonary colonization by tumor cells. B16-F10 murine melanoma cells were treated with SW in growth medium and then injected intravenously into syngeneic C57BL/6 mice. This treatment resulted in dramatic inhibition of colonization, but it had no effect on B16-F10 viability or on cellular tumorigenicity after subcutaneous implantation.more » SW-treated radiolabeled B16-F10 cells were cleared from the lungs at a great rate than control cells, suggesting that one effect of treatment is to alter tumor cell retention in the target organ. The results implicate specific glycan structures in pulmonary colonization and offer a potential approach for identification of specific macromolecules involved in tumor cell-organ recognition during metastasis.« less