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Title: Rubber friction on road surfaces: Experiment and theory for low sliding speeds

Abstract

We study rubber friction for tire tread compounds on asphalt road surfaces. The road surface topographies are measured using a stylus instrument and atomic force microscopy, and the surface roughness power spectra are calculated. The rubber viscoelastic modulus mastercurves are obtained from dynamic mechanical analysis measurements and the large-strain effective modulus is obtained from strain sweep data. The rubber friction is measured at different temperatures and sliding velocities, and is compared to the calculated data obtained using the Persson contact mechanics theory. We conclude that in addition to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber surface by the road asperities, there is an important contribution to the rubber friction from shear processes in the area of contact. The analysis shows that the latter contribution may arise from rubber molecules (or patches of rubber) undergoing bonding-stretching-debonding cycles as discussed in a classic paper by Schallamach.

Authors:
;  [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. PGI, FZ Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)
  2. Hankook Tire Co. LTD., 112 Gajeongbuk-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-725 (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22415805
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Chemical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 142; Journal Issue: 19; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9606
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ASPHALTS; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; BONDING; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DEFORMATION; ELASTICITY; FRICTION; MECHANICS; MOLECULES; ROUGHNESS; RUBBERS; SHEAR; STRAINS; SURFACES; TIRES; TOPOGRAPHY; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Lorenz, B., Persson, B. N. J., Oh, Y. R., Nam, S. K., and Jeon, S. H. Rubber friction on road surfaces: Experiment and theory for low sliding speeds. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4919221.
Lorenz, B., Persson, B. N. J., Oh, Y. R., Nam, S. K., & Jeon, S. H. Rubber friction on road surfaces: Experiment and theory for low sliding speeds. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4919221.
Lorenz, B., Persson, B. N. J., Oh, Y. R., Nam, S. K., and Jeon, S. H. Thu . "Rubber friction on road surfaces: Experiment and theory for low sliding speeds". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4919221.
@article{osti_22415805,
title = {Rubber friction on road surfaces: Experiment and theory for low sliding speeds},
author = {Lorenz, B. and Persson, B. N. J. and Oh, Y. R. and Nam, S. K. and Jeon, S. H.},
abstractNote = {We study rubber friction for tire tread compounds on asphalt road surfaces. The road surface topographies are measured using a stylus instrument and atomic force microscopy, and the surface roughness power spectra are calculated. The rubber viscoelastic modulus mastercurves are obtained from dynamic mechanical analysis measurements and the large-strain effective modulus is obtained from strain sweep data. The rubber friction is measured at different temperatures and sliding velocities, and is compared to the calculated data obtained using the Persson contact mechanics theory. We conclude that in addition to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber surface by the road asperities, there is an important contribution to the rubber friction from shear processes in the area of contact. The analysis shows that the latter contribution may arise from rubber molecules (or patches of rubber) undergoing bonding-stretching-debonding cycles as discussed in a classic paper by Schallamach.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4919221},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
issn = {0021-9606},
number = 19,
volume = 142,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {5}
}