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Title: Investigating CT to CBCT image registration for head and neck proton therapy as a tool for daily dose recalculation

Abstract

Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) of head and neck (H and N) cancer patients may be improved by plan adaptation. The decision to adapt the treatment plan based on a dose recalculation on the current anatomy requires a diagnostic quality computed tomography (CT) scan of the patient. As gantry-mounted cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners are currently being offered by vendors, they may offer daily or weekly updates of patient anatomy. CBCT image quality may not be sufficient for accurate proton dose calculation and it is likely necessary to perform CBCT CT number correction. In this work, the authors investigated deformable image registration (DIR) of the planning CT (pCT) to the CBCT to generate a virtual CT (vCT) to be used for proton dose recalculation. Methods: Datasets of six H and N cancer patients undergoing photon intensity modulated radiation therapy were used in this study to validate the vCT approach. Each dataset contained a CBCT acquired within 3 days of a replanning CT (rpCT), in addition to a pCT. The pCT and rpCT were delineated by a physician. A Morphons algorithm was employed in this work to perform DIR of the pCT to CBCT following a rigid registration of themore » two images. The contours from the pCT were deformed using the vector field resulting from DIR to yield a contoured vCT. The DIR accuracy was evaluated with a scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm comparing automatically identified matching features between vCT and CBCT. The rpCT was used as reference for evaluation of the vCT. The vCT and rpCT CT numbers were converted to stopping power ratio and the water equivalent thickness (WET) was calculated. IMPT dose distributions from treatment plans optimized on the pCT were recalculated with a Monte Carlo algorithm on the rpCT and vCT for comparison in terms of gamma index, dose volume histogram (DVH) statistics as well as proton range. The DIR generated contours on the vCT were compared to physician-drawn contours on the rpCT. Results: The DIR accuracy was better than 1.4 mm according to the SIFT evaluation. The mean WET differences between vCT (pCT) and rpCT were below 1 mm (2.6 mm). The amount of voxels passing 3%/3 mm gamma criteria were above 95% for the vCT vs rpCT. When using the rpCT contour set to derive DVH statistics from dose distributions calculated on the rpCT and vCT the differences, expressed in terms of 30 fractions of 2 Gy, were within [−4, 2 Gy] for parotid glands (D{sub mean}), spinal cord (D{sub 2%}), brainstem (D{sub 2%}), and CTV (D{sub 95%}). When using DIR generated contours for the vCT, those differences ranged within [−8, 11 Gy]. Conclusions: In this work, the authors generated CBCT based stopping power distributions using DIR of the pCT to a CBCT scan. DIR accuracy was below 1.4 mm as evaluated by the SIFT algorithm. Dose distributions calculated on the vCT agreed well to those calculated on the rpCT when using gamma index evaluation as well as DVH statistics based on the same contours. The use of DIR generated contours introduced variability in DVH statistics.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ; ; ; ;  [2]; ; ;  [3]; ;  [4]; ;  [5]; ; ;  [6]
  1. Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich D85748, Germany and Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich D81377 (Germany)
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich D81377 (Germany)
  3. Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich D85748 (Germany)
  4. ICTEAM, Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-La-Neuve B1348 (Belgium)
  5. Department of Radiation Oncology, Technische Universität München, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich D81675, Germany and Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching D85748 (Germany)
  6. Dipartimento di Elettronica Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milan 20133 (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22413477
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CAT SCANNING; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; HEAD; IMAGE PROCESSING; NECK; NEOPLASMS; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIOTHERAPY; STOPPING POWER

Citation Formats

Landry, Guillaume, E-mail: g.landry@lmu.de, Nijhuis, Reinoud, Thieke, Christian, Reiner, Michael, Ganswindt, Ute, Belka, Claus, Dedes, George, Handrack, Josefine, Parodi, Katia, Janssens, Guillaume, Orban de Xivry, Jonathan, Kamp, Florian, Wilkens, Jan J., Paganelli, Chiara, Riboldi, Marco, and Baroni, Guido. Investigating CT to CBCT image registration for head and neck proton therapy as a tool for daily dose recalculation. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4908223.
Landry, Guillaume, E-mail: g.landry@lmu.de, Nijhuis, Reinoud, Thieke, Christian, Reiner, Michael, Ganswindt, Ute, Belka, Claus, Dedes, George, Handrack, Josefine, Parodi, Katia, Janssens, Guillaume, Orban de Xivry, Jonathan, Kamp, Florian, Wilkens, Jan J., Paganelli, Chiara, Riboldi, Marco, & Baroni, Guido. Investigating CT to CBCT image registration for head and neck proton therapy as a tool for daily dose recalculation. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4908223.
Landry, Guillaume, E-mail: g.landry@lmu.de, Nijhuis, Reinoud, Thieke, Christian, Reiner, Michael, Ganswindt, Ute, Belka, Claus, Dedes, George, Handrack, Josefine, Parodi, Katia, Janssens, Guillaume, Orban de Xivry, Jonathan, Kamp, Florian, Wilkens, Jan J., Paganelli, Chiara, Riboldi, Marco, and Baroni, Guido. Sun . "Investigating CT to CBCT image registration for head and neck proton therapy as a tool for daily dose recalculation". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4908223.
@article{osti_22413477,
title = {Investigating CT to CBCT image registration for head and neck proton therapy as a tool for daily dose recalculation},
author = {Landry, Guillaume, E-mail: g.landry@lmu.de and Nijhuis, Reinoud and Thieke, Christian and Reiner, Michael and Ganswindt, Ute and Belka, Claus and Dedes, George and Handrack, Josefine and Parodi, Katia and Janssens, Guillaume and Orban de Xivry, Jonathan and Kamp, Florian and Wilkens, Jan J. and Paganelli, Chiara and Riboldi, Marco and Baroni, Guido},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) of head and neck (H and N) cancer patients may be improved by plan adaptation. The decision to adapt the treatment plan based on a dose recalculation on the current anatomy requires a diagnostic quality computed tomography (CT) scan of the patient. As gantry-mounted cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners are currently being offered by vendors, they may offer daily or weekly updates of patient anatomy. CBCT image quality may not be sufficient for accurate proton dose calculation and it is likely necessary to perform CBCT CT number correction. In this work, the authors investigated deformable image registration (DIR) of the planning CT (pCT) to the CBCT to generate a virtual CT (vCT) to be used for proton dose recalculation. Methods: Datasets of six H and N cancer patients undergoing photon intensity modulated radiation therapy were used in this study to validate the vCT approach. Each dataset contained a CBCT acquired within 3 days of a replanning CT (rpCT), in addition to a pCT. The pCT and rpCT were delineated by a physician. A Morphons algorithm was employed in this work to perform DIR of the pCT to CBCT following a rigid registration of the two images. The contours from the pCT were deformed using the vector field resulting from DIR to yield a contoured vCT. The DIR accuracy was evaluated with a scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm comparing automatically identified matching features between vCT and CBCT. The rpCT was used as reference for evaluation of the vCT. The vCT and rpCT CT numbers were converted to stopping power ratio and the water equivalent thickness (WET) was calculated. IMPT dose distributions from treatment plans optimized on the pCT were recalculated with a Monte Carlo algorithm on the rpCT and vCT for comparison in terms of gamma index, dose volume histogram (DVH) statistics as well as proton range. The DIR generated contours on the vCT were compared to physician-drawn contours on the rpCT. Results: The DIR accuracy was better than 1.4 mm according to the SIFT evaluation. The mean WET differences between vCT (pCT) and rpCT were below 1 mm (2.6 mm). The amount of voxels passing 3%/3 mm gamma criteria were above 95% for the vCT vs rpCT. When using the rpCT contour set to derive DVH statistics from dose distributions calculated on the rpCT and vCT the differences, expressed in terms of 30 fractions of 2 Gy, were within [−4, 2 Gy] for parotid glands (D{sub mean}), spinal cord (D{sub 2%}), brainstem (D{sub 2%}), and CTV (D{sub 95%}). When using DIR generated contours for the vCT, those differences ranged within [−8, 11 Gy]. Conclusions: In this work, the authors generated CBCT based stopping power distributions using DIR of the pCT to a CBCT scan. DIR accuracy was below 1.4 mm as evaluated by the SIFT algorithm. Dose distributions calculated on the vCT agreed well to those calculated on the rpCT when using gamma index evaluation as well as DVH statistics based on the same contours. The use of DIR generated contours introduced variability in DVH statistics.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4908223},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Sun Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: To develop a CBCT HU correction method using a patient specific HU to mass density conversion curve based on a novel image registration and organ mapping method for head-and-neck radiation therapy. Methods: There are three steps to generate a patient specific CBCT HU to mass density conversion curve. First, we developed a novel robust image registration method based on sparseness analysis to register the planning CT (PCT) and the CBCT. Second, a novel organ mapping method was developed to transfer the organs at risk (OAR) contours from the PCT to the CBCT and corresponding mean HU values of eachmore » OAR were measured in both the PCT and CBCT volumes. Third, a set of PCT and CBCT HU to mass density conversion curves were created based on the mean HU values of OARs and the corresponding mass density of the OAR in the PCT. Then, we compared our proposed conversion curve with the traditional Catphan phantom based CBCT HU to mass density calibration curve. Both curves were input into the treatment planning system (TPS) for dose calculation. Last, the PTV and OAR doses, DVH and dose distributions of CBCT plans are compared to the original treatment plan. Results: One head-and-neck cases which contained a pair of PCT and CBCT was used. The dose differences between the PCT and CBCT plans using the proposed method are −1.33% for the mean PTV, 0.06% for PTV D95%, and −0.56% for the left neck. The dose differences between plans of PCT and CBCT corrected using the CATPhan based method are −4.39% for mean PTV, 4.07% for PTV D95%, and −2.01% for the left neck. Conclusion: The proposed CBCT HU correction method achieves better agreement with the original treatment plan compared to the traditional CATPhan based calibration method.« less
  • Purpose: Accurate deformable image registration (DIR) between CT and CBCT in H&N is challenging. In this study, we propose a practical hybrid method that uses not only the pixel intensities but also organ physical properties, structure volume of interest (VOI), and interactive local registrations. Methods: Five oropharyngeal cancer patients were selected retrospectively. For each patient, the planning CT was registered to the last fraction CBCT, where the anatomy difference was largest. A three step registration strategy was tested; Step1) DIR using pixel intensity only, Step2) DIR with additional use of structure VOI and rigidity penalty, and Step3) interactive local correction.more » For Step1, a public-domain open-source DIR algorithm was used (cubic B-spline, mutual information, steepest gradient optimization, and 4-level multi-resolution). For Step2, rigidity penalty was applied on bony anatomies and brain, and a structure VOI was used to handle the body truncation such as the shoulder cut-off on CBCT. Finally, in Step3, the registrations were reviewed on our in-house developed software and the erroneous areas were corrected via a local registration using level-set motion algorithm. Results: After Step1, there were considerable amount of registration errors in soft tissues and unrealistic stretching in the posterior to the neck and near the shoulder due to body truncation. The brain was also found deformed to a measurable extent near the superior border of CBCT. Such errors could be effectively removed by using a structure VOI and rigidity penalty. The rest of the local soft tissue error could be corrected using the interactive software tool. The estimated interactive correction time was approximately 5 minutes. Conclusion: The DIR using only the image pixel intensity was vulnerable to noise and body truncation. A corrective action was inevitable to achieve good quality of registrations. We found the proposed three-step hybrid method efficient and practical for CT/CBCT registrations in H&N. My department receives grant support from Industrial partners: (a) Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, and (b) Philips HealthCare, Best, Netherlands.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate geometric and dosimetric uncertainties of CT-CBCT deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms using digital phantoms generated from real patients. Methods: We selected ten H&N cancer patients with adaptive IMRT. For each patient, a planning CT (CT1), a replanning CT (CT2), and a pretreatment CBCT (CBCT1) were used as the basis for digital phantom creation. Manually adjusted meshes were created for selected ROIs (e.g. PTVs, brainstem, spinal cord, mandible, and parotids) on CT1 and CT2. The mesh vertices were input into a thin-plate spline algorithm to generate a reference displacement vector field (DVF). The reference DVF was applied tomore » CBCT1 to create a simulated mid-treatment CBCT (CBCT2). The CT-CBCT digital phantom consisted of CT1 and CBCT2, which were linked by the reference DVF. Three DIR algorithms (Demons, B-Spline, and intensity-based) were applied to these ten digital phantoms. The images, ROIs, and volumetric doses were mapped from CT1 to CBCT2 using the DVFs computed by these three DIRs and compared to those mapped using the reference DVF. Results: The average Dice coefficients for selected ROIs were from 0.83 to 0.94 for Demons, from 0.82 to 0.95 for B-Spline, and from 0.67 to 0.89 for intensity-based DIR. The average Hausdorff distances for selected ROIs were from 2.4 to 6.2 mm for Demons, from 1.8 to 5.9 mm for B-Spline, and from 2.8 to 11.2 mm for intensity-based DIR. The average absolute dose errors for selected ROIs were from 0.7 to 2.1 Gy for Demons, from 0.7 to 2.9 Gy for B- Spline, and from 1.3 to 4.5 Gy for intensity-based DIR. Conclusion: Using clinically realistic CT-CBCT digital phantoms, Demons and B-Spline were shown to have similar geometric and dosimetric uncertainties while intensity-based DIR had the worst uncertainties. CT-CBCT DIR has the potential to provide accurate CBCT-based dose verification for H&N adaptive radiotherapy. Z Shen: None; K Bzdusek: an employee of Philips Healthcare; S Koyfman: None; P Xia: received research grants from Philips Healthcare and Siemens Healthcare.« less
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of using computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam CT (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) for the application of calculating the “dose of the day” received by a head and neck patient. Methods: NiftyReg is an open-source registration package implemented in our institution. The affine registration uses a Block Matching-based approach, while the deformable registration is a GPU implementation of the popular B-spline Free Form Deformation algorithm. Two independent tests were performed to assess the suitability of our registrations methodology for “dose of the day” calculations in a deformed CT. Amore » geometric evaluation was performed to assess the ability of the DIR method to map identical structures between the CT and CBCT datasets. Features delineated in the planning CT were warped and compared with features manually drawn on the CBCT. The authors computed the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transformation, and centre of mass distance between features. A dosimetric evaluation was performed to evaluate the clinical significance of the registrations errors in the application proposed and to identify the limitations of the approximations used. Dose calculations for the same intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan on the deformed CT and replan CT were compared. Dose distributions were compared in terms of dose differences (DD), gamma analysis, target coverage, and dose volume histograms (DVHs). Doses calculated in a rigidly aligned CT and directly in an extended CBCT were also evaluated. Results: A mean value of 0.850 in DSC was achieved in overlap between manually delineated and warped features, with the distance between surfaces being less than 2 mm on over 90% of the pixels. Deformable registration was clearly superior to rigid registration in mapping identical structures between the two datasets. The dose recalculated in the deformed CT is a good match to the dose calculated on a replan CT. The DD is smaller than 2% of the prescribed dose on 90% of the body's voxels and it passes a 2% and 2 mm gamma-test on over 95% of the voxels. Target coverage similarity was assessed in terms of the 95%-isodose volumes. A mean value of 0.962 was obtained for the DSC, while the distance between surfaces is less than 2 mm in 95.4% of the pixels. The method proposed provided adequate dose estimation, closer to the gold standard than the other two approaches. Differences in DVH curves were mainly due to differences in the OARs definition (manual vs warped) and not due to differences in dose estimation (dose calculated in replan CT vs dose calculated in deformed CT). Conclusions: Deforming a planning CT to match a daily CBCT provides the tools needed for the calculation of the “dose of the day” without the need to acquire a new CT. The initial clinical application of our method will be weekly offline calculations of the “dose of the day,” and use this information to inform adaptive radiotherapy (ART). The work here presented is a first step into a full implementation of a “dose-driven” online ART.« less
  • Purpose: To analyze changes in parotid gland dose resulting from anatomic changes throughout a course of radiotherapy in a cohort of head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 10 head-and-neck cancer patients treated definitively with intensity-modulated radiotherapy on a helical tomotherapy unit. A total of 330 daily megavoltage computed tomography images were retrospectively processed through a deformable image registration algorithm to be registered to the planning kilovoltage computed tomography images. The process resulted in deformed parotid contours and voxel mappings for both daily and accumulated dose-volume histogram calculations. The daily and cumulative dose deviations from themore » original treatment plan were analyzed. Correlations between dosimetric variations and anatomic changes were investigated. Results: The daily parotid mean dose of the 10 patients differed from the plan dose by an average of 15%. At the end of the treatment, 3 of the 10 patients were estimated to have received a greater than 10% higher mean parotid dose than in the original plan (range, 13-42%), whereas the remaining 7 patients received doses that differed by less than 10% (range, -6-8%). The dose difference was correlated with a migration of the parotids toward the high-dose region. Conclusions: The use of deformable image registration techniques and daily megavoltage computed tomography imaging makes it possible to calculate daily and accumulated dose-volume histograms. Significant dose variations were observed as result of interfractional anatomic changes. These techniques enable the implementation of dose-adaptive radiotherapy.« less