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Title: Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo

Abstract

Purpose: Tracking the motion of biological tissues represents an important issue in the field of medical ultrasound imaging. However, the longitudinal component of the motion (i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis) remains more challenging to extract due to the rather coarse resolution cell of ultrasound scanners along this direction. The aim of this study is to introduce a real-time beamforming strategy dedicated to acquire tagged images featuring a distinct pattern in the objective to ease the tracking. Methods: Under the conditions of the Fraunhofer approximation, a specific apodization function was applied to the received raw channel data, in real-time during image acquisition, in order to introduce a periodic oscillations pattern along the longitudinal direction of the radio frequency signal. Analytic signals were then extracted from the tagged images, and subpixel motion tracking of the intima–media complex was subsequently performed offline, by means of a previously introduced bidimensional analytic phase-based estimator. Results: The authors’ framework was applied in vivo on the common carotid artery from 20 young healthy volunteers and 6 elderly patients with high atherosclerosis risk. Cine-loops of tagged images were acquired during three cardiac cycles. Evaluated against reference trajectories manually generated by three experienced analysts, the mean absolute trackingmore » error was 98 ± 84 μm and 55 ± 44 μm in the longitudinal and axial directions, respectively. These errors corresponded to 28% ± 23% and 13% ± 9% of the longitudinal and axial amplitude of the assessed motion, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed framework enables tagged ultrasound images of in vivo tissues to be acquired in real-time. Such unconventional beamforming strategy contributes to improve tracking accuracy and could potentially benefit to the interpretation and diagnosis of biomedical images.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ; ;  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam 3000 CA (Netherlands)
  2. Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Lyon 69100 (France)
  3. Department of Radiology, Louis Pradel Hospital, Lyon 69500 (France)
  4. Department of Endocrinology, Louis Pradel Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Lyon 69100, France and INSERM UMR 1060, Lyon 69500 (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22413447
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ARTERIOSCLEROSIS; CAROTID ARTERIES; DIAGNOSIS; IN VIVO; PERIODICITY; ULTRASONOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Zahnd, Guillaume, E-mail: g.zahnd@erasmusmc.nl, Salles, Sébastien, Liebgott, Hervé, Vray, Didier, Sérusclat, André, and Moulin, Philippe. Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4905376.
Zahnd, Guillaume, E-mail: g.zahnd@erasmusmc.nl, Salles, Sébastien, Liebgott, Hervé, Vray, Didier, Sérusclat, André, & Moulin, Philippe. Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4905376.
Zahnd, Guillaume, E-mail: g.zahnd@erasmusmc.nl, Salles, Sébastien, Liebgott, Hervé, Vray, Didier, Sérusclat, André, and Moulin, Philippe. Sun . "Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4905376.
@article{osti_22413447,
title = {Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo},
author = {Zahnd, Guillaume, E-mail: g.zahnd@erasmusmc.nl and Salles, Sébastien and Liebgott, Hervé and Vray, Didier and Sérusclat, André and Moulin, Philippe},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Tracking the motion of biological tissues represents an important issue in the field of medical ultrasound imaging. However, the longitudinal component of the motion (i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis) remains more challenging to extract due to the rather coarse resolution cell of ultrasound scanners along this direction. The aim of this study is to introduce a real-time beamforming strategy dedicated to acquire tagged images featuring a distinct pattern in the objective to ease the tracking. Methods: Under the conditions of the Fraunhofer approximation, a specific apodization function was applied to the received raw channel data, in real-time during image acquisition, in order to introduce a periodic oscillations pattern along the longitudinal direction of the radio frequency signal. Analytic signals were then extracted from the tagged images, and subpixel motion tracking of the intima–media complex was subsequently performed offline, by means of a previously introduced bidimensional analytic phase-based estimator. Results: The authors’ framework was applied in vivo on the common carotid artery from 20 young healthy volunteers and 6 elderly patients with high atherosclerosis risk. Cine-loops of tagged images were acquired during three cardiac cycles. Evaluated against reference trajectories manually generated by three experienced analysts, the mean absolute tracking error was 98 ± 84 μm and 55 ± 44 μm in the longitudinal and axial directions, respectively. These errors corresponded to 28% ± 23% and 13% ± 9% of the longitudinal and axial amplitude of the assessed motion, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed framework enables tagged ultrasound images of in vivo tissues to be acquired in real-time. Such unconventional beamforming strategy contributes to improve tracking accuracy and could potentially benefit to the interpretation and diagnosis of biomedical images.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4905376},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Sun Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}
  • Aneurysm of the common carotid artery is a rare and serious disease requiring prompt treatment in order to avoid neurologic complications. A 39-year-old man presented with voice impairment and a pulsatile mass at the right side of his neck and was found by color Doppler examination to have bilateral common carotid artery aneurysms of unknown origin. The right-sided large aneurysm was treated with placement of an 8 mm interposition Gore-Tex graft between the right common and internal carotid arteries. The surgical graft thrombosed 7 days after the surgery but the left-sided aneurysm was successfully treated by a Jostent peripheral stent-graft.more » Color Doppler examination showed a patent stent and no filling of the aneurysm on his first and sixth-month follow-up. Bilateral common carotid artery aneurysm is an exceptionally unusual condition and endovascular treatment of carotid artery aneurysms with covered stents may become an effective treatment alternative for these lesions.« less
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and midterm outcome of elective implantation of the Carotid Wallstent (registered) in patients considered to be at high surgical risk. In a prospective study, 54 carotid artery stenoses in 51 patients were stented over a 24-month period. Three patients underwent bilateral carotid artery stenting. Institutional inclusion criteria for invasive treatment of carotid occlusive disease (carotid endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting) are patients presenting with a 70% or more symptomatic stenosis and those with an 80% or more asymptomatic stenosis having a life-expectancy of more than 1 year. All patientsmore » treated by carotid artery stenting were considered at high risk for carotid endarterectomy because of a hostile neck (17 patients-31.5%) or because of severe comorbidities (37 patients-68.5%). No cerebral protection device was used. Of the 54 lesions, 33 (61.1%) were symptomatic and 21 (38.8%) were asymptomatic. Follow-up was performed by physical examination and by duplex ultrasonography at 1 month, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after the procedure. All 54 lesions could be stented successfully without periprocedural stroke. Advert events during follow-up (mean 13.9 {+-} 5.7 months) were non-stroke-related death in 6 patients (11.1%), minor stroke in 4 stented hemispheres(7.4%), transient ipsilateral facial pain in 1 patient (1.8%),infection of the stented surgical patch in 1 patient (1.8%) and asymptomatic in stent restenosis in 4 patients (7.4%). The percutaneous implantation of the Carotid Wallstent (registered) , even without cerebral protection device, appears to be a safe procedure with acceptable clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up results in patients at high surgical risk. But some late adverse events such as ipsilateral recurrence of non-disabling (minor) stroke or in stent restenosis still remain real challenging problems.« less
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