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Title: Imaging nanowire plasmon modes with two-photon polymerization

Abstract

Metal nanowires sustain propagating surface plasmons that are strongly confined to the wire surface. Plasmon reflection at the wire end faces and interference lead to standing plasmon modes. We demonstrate that these modes can be imaged via two-photon (plasmon) polymerization of a thin film resist covering the wires and subsequent electron microscopy. Thereby, the plasmon wavelength and the phase shift of the nanowire mode picked up upon reflection can be directly retrieved. In general terms, polymerization imaging is a promising tool for the imaging of propagating plasmon modes from the nano- to micro-scale.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Institute of Physics, Karl-Franzens-University, Universitätsplatz 5, 8010 Graz (Austria)
  2. Joanneum Research Materials—Institute for Surface Technologies and Photonics, Franz-Pichler Strasse 30, 8160 Weiz (Austria)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22412674
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; IMAGES; INTERFERENCE; NANOWIRES; PHASE SHIFT; PHOTONS; PLASMONS; POLYMERIZATION; REFLECTION; SURFACES; THIN FILMS

Citation Formats

Gruber, Christian, Trügler, Andreas, Hohenester, Ulrich, Ditlbacher, Harald, Hohenau, Andreas, Krenn, Joachim R., E-mail: joachim.krenn@uni-graz.at, Hirzer, Andreas, and Schmidt, Volker. Imaging nanowire plasmon modes with two-photon polymerization. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4913470.
Gruber, Christian, Trügler, Andreas, Hohenester, Ulrich, Ditlbacher, Harald, Hohenau, Andreas, Krenn, Joachim R., E-mail: joachim.krenn@uni-graz.at, Hirzer, Andreas, & Schmidt, Volker. Imaging nanowire plasmon modes with two-photon polymerization. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4913470.
Gruber, Christian, Trügler, Andreas, Hohenester, Ulrich, Ditlbacher, Harald, Hohenau, Andreas, Krenn, Joachim R., E-mail: joachim.krenn@uni-graz.at, Hirzer, Andreas, and Schmidt, Volker. Mon . "Imaging nanowire plasmon modes with two-photon polymerization". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4913470.
@article{osti_22412674,
title = {Imaging nanowire plasmon modes with two-photon polymerization},
author = {Gruber, Christian and Trügler, Andreas and Hohenester, Ulrich and Ditlbacher, Harald and Hohenau, Andreas and Krenn, Joachim R., E-mail: joachim.krenn@uni-graz.at and Hirzer, Andreas and Schmidt, Volker},
abstractNote = {Metal nanowires sustain propagating surface plasmons that are strongly confined to the wire surface. Plasmon reflection at the wire end faces and interference lead to standing plasmon modes. We demonstrate that these modes can be imaged via two-photon (plasmon) polymerization of a thin film resist covering the wires and subsequent electron microscopy. Thereby, the plasmon wavelength and the phase shift of the nanowire mode picked up upon reflection can be directly retrieved. In general terms, polymerization imaging is a promising tool for the imaging of propagating plasmon modes from the nano- to micro-scale.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4913470},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 8,
volume = 106,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 23 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Mon Feb 23 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}
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