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Title: Prostatome: A combined anatomical and disease based MRI atlas of the prostate

Abstract

Purpose: In this work, the authors introduce a novel framework, the anatomically constrained registration (AnCoR) scheme and apply it to create a fused anatomic-disease atlas of the prostate which the authors refer to as the prostatome. The prostatome combines a MRI based anatomic and a histology based disease atlas. Statistical imaging atlases allow for the integration of information across multiple scales and imaging modalities into a single canonical representation, in turn enabling a fused anatomical-disease representation which may facilitate the characterization of disease appearance relative to anatomic structures. While statistical atlases have been extensively developed and studied for the brain, approaches that have attempted to combine pathology and imaging data for study of prostate pathology are not extant. This works seeks to address this gap. Methods: The AnCoR framework optimizes a scoring function composed of two surface (prostate and central gland) misalignment measures and one intensity-based similarity term. This ensures the correct mapping of anatomic regions into the atlas, even when regional MRI intensities are inconsistent or highly variable between subjects. The framework allows for creation of an anatomic imaging and a disease atlas, while enabling their fusion into the anatomic imaging-disease atlas. The atlas presented here was constructed usingmore » 83 subjects with biopsy confirmed cancer who had pre-operative MRI (collected at two institutions) followed by radical prostatectomy. The imaging atlas results from mapping thein vivo MRI into the canonical space, while the anatomic regions serve as domain constraints. Elastic co-registration MRI and corresponding ex vivo histology provides “ground truth” mapping of cancer extent on in vivo imaging for 23 subjects. Results: AnCoR was evaluated relative to alternative construction strategies that use either MRI intensities or the prostate surface alone for registration. The AnCoR framework yielded a central gland Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 90%, and prostate DSC of 88%, while the misalignment of the urethra and verumontanum was found to be 3.45 mm, and 4.73 mm, respectively, which were measured to be significantly smaller compared to the alternative strategies. As might have been anticipated from our limited cohort of biopsy confirmed cancers, the disease atlas showed that most of the tumor extent was limited to the peripheral zone. Moreover, central gland tumors were typically larger in size, possibly because they are only discernible at a much later stage. Conclusions: The authors presented the AnCoR framework to explicitly model anatomic constraints for the construction of a fused anatomic imaging-disease atlas. The framework was applied to constructing a preliminary version of an anatomic-disease atlas of the prostate, the prostatome. The prostatome could facilitate the quantitative characterization of gland morphology and imaging features of prostate cancer. These techniques, may be applied on a large sample size data set to create a fully developed prostatome that could serve as a spatial prior for targeted biopsies by urologists. Additionally, the AnCoR framework could allow for incorporation of complementary imaging and molecular data, thereby enabling their careful correlation for population based radio-omics studies.« less

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3]; ;  [4];  [5]
  1. Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)
  2. Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118 (United States)
  3. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)
  4. UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235 (United States)
  5. Riverside Research Institute, New York, New York 10038 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22412468
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: (c) 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOPSY; BRAIN; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CORRELATIONS; HISTOLOGY; IMAGE PROCESSING; IN VIVO; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PATHOLOGY; PROSTATE; URINARY TRACT

Citation Formats

Rusu, Mirabela, Madabhushi, Anant, E-mail: anant.madabhushi@case.edu, Bloch, B. Nicolas, Jaffe, Carl C., Genega, Elizabeth M., Lenkinski, Robert E., Rofsky, Neil M., and Feleppa, Ernest. Prostatome: A combined anatomical and disease based MRI atlas of the prostate. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4881515.
Rusu, Mirabela, Madabhushi, Anant, E-mail: anant.madabhushi@case.edu, Bloch, B. Nicolas, Jaffe, Carl C., Genega, Elizabeth M., Lenkinski, Robert E., Rofsky, Neil M., & Feleppa, Ernest. Prostatome: A combined anatomical and disease based MRI atlas of the prostate. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4881515.
Rusu, Mirabela, Madabhushi, Anant, E-mail: anant.madabhushi@case.edu, Bloch, B. Nicolas, Jaffe, Carl C., Genega, Elizabeth M., Lenkinski, Robert E., Rofsky, Neil M., and Feleppa, Ernest. Tue . "Prostatome: A combined anatomical and disease based MRI atlas of the prostate". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4881515.
@article{osti_22412468,
title = {Prostatome: A combined anatomical and disease based MRI atlas of the prostate},
author = {Rusu, Mirabela and Madabhushi, Anant, E-mail: anant.madabhushi@case.edu and Bloch, B. Nicolas and Jaffe, Carl C. and Genega, Elizabeth M. and Lenkinski, Robert E. and Rofsky, Neil M. and Feleppa, Ernest},
abstractNote = {Purpose: In this work, the authors introduce a novel framework, the anatomically constrained registration (AnCoR) scheme and apply it to create a fused anatomic-disease atlas of the prostate which the authors refer to as the prostatome. The prostatome combines a MRI based anatomic and a histology based disease atlas. Statistical imaging atlases allow for the integration of information across multiple scales and imaging modalities into a single canonical representation, in turn enabling a fused anatomical-disease representation which may facilitate the characterization of disease appearance relative to anatomic structures. While statistical atlases have been extensively developed and studied for the brain, approaches that have attempted to combine pathology and imaging data for study of prostate pathology are not extant. This works seeks to address this gap. Methods: The AnCoR framework optimizes a scoring function composed of two surface (prostate and central gland) misalignment measures and one intensity-based similarity term. This ensures the correct mapping of anatomic regions into the atlas, even when regional MRI intensities are inconsistent or highly variable between subjects. The framework allows for creation of an anatomic imaging and a disease atlas, while enabling their fusion into the anatomic imaging-disease atlas. The atlas presented here was constructed using 83 subjects with biopsy confirmed cancer who had pre-operative MRI (collected at two institutions) followed by radical prostatectomy. The imaging atlas results from mapping thein vivo MRI into the canonical space, while the anatomic regions serve as domain constraints. Elastic co-registration MRI and corresponding ex vivo histology provides “ground truth” mapping of cancer extent on in vivo imaging for 23 subjects. Results: AnCoR was evaluated relative to alternative construction strategies that use either MRI intensities or the prostate surface alone for registration. The AnCoR framework yielded a central gland Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 90%, and prostate DSC of 88%, while the misalignment of the urethra and verumontanum was found to be 3.45 mm, and 4.73 mm, respectively, which were measured to be significantly smaller compared to the alternative strategies. As might have been anticipated from our limited cohort of biopsy confirmed cancers, the disease atlas showed that most of the tumor extent was limited to the peripheral zone. Moreover, central gland tumors were typically larger in size, possibly because they are only discernible at a much later stage. Conclusions: The authors presented the AnCoR framework to explicitly model anatomic constraints for the construction of a fused anatomic imaging-disease atlas. The framework was applied to constructing a preliminary version of an anatomic-disease atlas of the prostate, the prostatome. The prostatome could facilitate the quantitative characterization of gland morphology and imaging features of prostate cancer. These techniques, may be applied on a large sample size data set to create a fully developed prostatome that could serve as a spatial prior for targeted biopsies by urologists. Additionally, the AnCoR framework could allow for incorporation of complementary imaging and molecular data, thereby enabling their careful correlation for population based radio-omics studies.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4881515},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 7,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
  • Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population,more » and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean {+-} standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 {+-} 0.12, 0.70 {+-} 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 {+-} 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 {+-} 0.16 for the rectum. Conclusions: The electron-density atlas method provides the ability to automatically define organs and map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for radiotherapy dose planning and DRR generation. This method provides the necessary tools for MRI-alone treatment planning and adaptive MRI-based prostate radiation therapy.« less
  • Purpose: Automatically generated prostate MRI contours can be used to aid in image registration with CT or ultrasound and to reduce the burden of contouring for radiation treatment planning. In addition, prostate and zonal contours can assist to automate quantitative imaging features extraction and the analyses of longitudinal MRI studies. These potential gains are limited if the solutions are not compatible across different MRI vendors. The goal of this study is to characterize an atlas based automatic segmentation procedure of the prostate collected on MRI systems from multiple vendors. Methods: The prostate and peripheral zone (PZ) were manually contoured bymore » an expert radiation oncologist on T2-weighted scans acquired on both GE (n=31) and Siemens (n=33) 3T MRI systems. A leave-one-out approach was utilized where the target subject is removed from the atlas before the segmentation algorithm is initiated. The atlas-segmentation method finds the best nine matched atlas subjects and then performs a normalized intensity-based free-form deformable registration of these subjects to the target subject. These nine contours are then merged into a single contour using Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE). Contour comparisons were made using Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and Hausdorff distances. Results: Using the T2 FatSat (FS) GE datasets the atlas generated contours resulted in an average DSC of 0.83±0.06 for prostate, 0.57±0.12 for PZ and 0.75±0.09 for CG. Similar results were found when using the Siemens data with a DSC of 0.79±0.14 for prostate, 0.54±0.16 and 0.70±0.9. Contrast between prostate and surrounding anatomy and between the PZ and CG contours for both vendors demonstrated superior contrast separation; significance was found for all comparisons p-value < 0.0001. Conclusion: Atlas-based segmentation yielded promising results for all contours compared to expertly defined contours in both Siemens and GE 3T systems providing fast and automatic segmentation of the prostate. Funding Support, Disclosures, and Conflict of Interest: AS Nelson is a partial owner of MIM Software, Inc. AS Nelson, and A Swallen are current employees at MIM Software, Inc.« less
  • Purpose: To perform a rigorous technological assessment and statistical validation of a software technology for anatomic delineations of the prostate on MRI datasets. Methods and Materials: A 3-phase validation strategy was used. Phase I consisted of anatomic atlas building using 100 prostate cancer MRI data sets to provide training data sets for the segmentation algorithms. In phase II, 2 experts contoured 15 new MRI prostate cancer cases using 3 approaches (manual, N points, and region of interest). In phase III, 5 new physicians with variable MRI prostate contouring experience segmented the same 15 phase II datasets using 3 approaches: manual,more » N points with no editing, and full autosegmentation with user editing allowed. Statistical analyses for time and accuracy (using Dice similarity coefficient) endpoints used traditional descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, and pooled Student t test. Results: In phase I, average (SD) total and per slice contouring time for the 2 physicians was 228 (75), 17 (3.5), 209 (65), and 15 seconds (3.9), respectively. In phase II, statistically significant differences in physician contouring time were observed based on physician, type of contouring, and case sequence. The N points strategy resulted in superior segmentation accuracy when initial autosegmented contours were compared with final contours. In phase III, statistically significant differences in contouring time were observed based on physician, type of contouring, and case sequence again. The average relative timesaving for N points and autosegmentation were 49% and 27%, respectively, compared with manual contouring. The N points and autosegmentation strategies resulted in average Dice values of 0.89 and 0.88, respectively. Pre- and postedited autosegmented contours demonstrated a higher average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.94. Conclusion: The software provided robust contours with minimal editing required. Observed time savings were seen for all physicians irrespective of experience level and baseline manual contouring speed.« less
  • Purpose: Prostate MRI plays an important role in diagnosis, biopsy guidance, and therapy planning for prostate cancer. Prostate MRI contours can be used to aid in image fusion for ultrasound biopsy guidance and delivery of radiation. Our goal in this study is to evaluate an automatic atlas-based segmentation method for generating prostate and peripheral zone (PZ) contours on MRI. Methods: T2-weighted MRIs were acquired on 3T-Discovery MR750 System (GE, Milwaukee). The Volumes of Interest (VOIs): prostate and PZ were outlined by an expert radiation oncologist and used to create an atlas library for atlas-based segmentation. The atlas-segmentation accuracy was evaluatedmore » using a leave-one-out analysis. The method involved automatically finding the atlas subject that best matched the test subject followed by a normalized intensity-based free-form deformable registration of the atlas subject to the test subject. The prostate and PZ contours were transformed to the test subject using the same deformation. For each test subject the three best matches were used and the final contour was combined using Majority Vote. The atlas-segmentation process was fully automatic. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and mean Hausdorff values were used for comparison. Results: VOIs contours were available for 28 subjects. For the prostate, the atlas-based segmentation method resulted in an average DSC of 0.88+/−0.08 and a mean Hausdorff distance of 1.1+/−0.9mm. The number of patients (#) in DSC ranges are as follows: 0.60–0.69(1), 0.70–0.79(2), 0.80–0.89(13), >0.89(11). For the PZ, the average DSC was 0.72+/−0.17 and average Hausdorff of 0.9+/−0.9mm. The number of patients (#) in DSC ranges are as follows: <0.60(4), 0.60–0.69(6), 0.70–0.79(7), 0.80–0.89(9), >0.89(1). Conclusion: The MRI atlas-based segmentation method achieved good results for both the whole prostate and PZ compared to expert defined VOIs. The technique is fast, fully automatic, and has the potential to provide significant time savings for prostate VOI definition. AS Nelson and J Piper are partial owners of MIM Software, Inc. AS Nelson, J Piper, K Curry, and A Swallen are current employees at MIM Software, Inc.« less
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based and computed tomography (CT)/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry methods in permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and March 2006, a total of 52 consecutive patients with prostate cancer were treated by brachytherapy, and postimplant dosimetry was performed using CT/MRI fusion. The accuracy and reproducibility were prospectively compared between MRI-based dosimetry and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) related parameters as recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society. Results: The prostate volume was 15.97 {+-} 6.17 cc (mean {+-} SD) inmore » MRI-based dosimetry, and 15.97 {+-} 6.02 cc in CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry without statistical difference. The prostate V100 was 94.5% and 93.0% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.002). The prostate D90 was 119.4% and 114.4% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Our current results suggested that, as with fusion images, MR images allowed accurate contouring of the organs, but they tended to overestimate the analysis of postimplant dosimetry in comparison to CT/MRI fusion images. Although this MRI-based dosimetric discrepancy was negligible, MRI-based dosimetry was acceptable and reproducible in comparison to CT-based dosimetry, because the difference between MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results was smaller than that between CT-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results as previously reported.« less