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Title: Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources

Abstract

Purpose: The edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) method has been recently further developed to perform tomographic and, thus, volumetric imaging. In this paper, the first tomographic EI XPCi images acquired with a conventional x-ray source at dose levels below that used for preclinical small animal imaging are presented. Methods: Two test objects, a biological sample and a custom-built phantom, were imaged with a laboratory-based EI XPCi setup in tomography mode. Tomographic maps that show the phase shift and attenuating properties of the object were reconstructed, and analyzed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and quantitative accuracy. Dose measurements using thermoluminescence devices were performed. Results: The obtained images demonstrate that phase based imaging methods can provide superior results compared to attenuation based modalities for weakly attenuating samples also in 3D. Moreover, and, most importantly, they demonstrate the feasibility of low-dose imaging. In addition, the experimental results can be considered quantitative within the constraints imposed by polychromaticity. Conclusions: The results, together with the method's dose efficiency and compatibility with conventional x-ray sources, indicate that tomographic EI XPCi can become an important tool for the routine imaging of biomedical samples.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Malet Place, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)
  2. Optical + Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia and Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation, and Analysis, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22412454
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: (c) 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ACCURACY; PHANTOMS; PHASE SHIFT; RADIATION DOSES; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO; THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSIMETRY; TOMOGRAPHY; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Hagen, C. K., E-mail: charlotte.hagen.10@ucl.ac.uk, Endrizzi, M., Diemoz, P. C., Olivo, A., and Munro, P. R. T. Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4884297.
Hagen, C. K., E-mail: charlotte.hagen.10@ucl.ac.uk, Endrizzi, M., Diemoz, P. C., Olivo, A., & Munro, P. R. T. Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4884297.
Hagen, C. K., E-mail: charlotte.hagen.10@ucl.ac.uk, Endrizzi, M., Diemoz, P. C., Olivo, A., and Munro, P. R. T. Tue . "Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4884297.
@article{osti_22412454,
title = {Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources},
author = {Hagen, C. K., E-mail: charlotte.hagen.10@ucl.ac.uk and Endrizzi, M. and Diemoz, P. C. and Olivo, A. and Munro, P. R. T.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) method has been recently further developed to perform tomographic and, thus, volumetric imaging. In this paper, the first tomographic EI XPCi images acquired with a conventional x-ray source at dose levels below that used for preclinical small animal imaging are presented. Methods: Two test objects, a biological sample and a custom-built phantom, were imaged with a laboratory-based EI XPCi setup in tomography mode. Tomographic maps that show the phase shift and attenuating properties of the object were reconstructed, and analyzed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and quantitative accuracy. Dose measurements using thermoluminescence devices were performed. Results: The obtained images demonstrate that phase based imaging methods can provide superior results compared to attenuation based modalities for weakly attenuating samples also in 3D. Moreover, and, most importantly, they demonstrate the feasibility of low-dose imaging. In addition, the experimental results can be considered quantitative within the constraints imposed by polychromaticity. Conclusions: The results, together with the method's dose efficiency and compatibility with conventional x-ray sources, indicate that tomographic EI XPCi can become an important tool for the routine imaging of biomedical samples.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4884297},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 7,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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  • No abstract prepared.