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Title: Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma

Abstract

We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22410357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 22; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; AIR; ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE; DISTANCE; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTRODES; GAS FLOW; HELIUM; LENGTH; PLASMA; PLUMES; QUARTZ; RADIOWAVE RADIATION; TUBES

Citation Formats

Yambe, Kiyoyuki, Konda, Kohmei, and Ogura, Kazuo. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4921657.
Yambe, Kiyoyuki, Konda, Kohmei, & Ogura, Kazuo. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4921657.
Yambe, Kiyoyuki, Konda, Kohmei, and Ogura, Kazuo. 2015. "Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4921657.
@article{osti_22410357,
title = {Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma},
author = {Yambe, Kiyoyuki and Konda, Kohmei and Ogura, Kazuo},
abstractNote = {We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4921657},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 5,
volume = 22,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 5
}
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