skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Detection of nanoscale embedded layers using laboratory specular X-ray diffraction

Abstract

Unusual specular X-ray diffraction patterns have been observed from certain thin film intergrowths of metal monochalcogenide (MX) and transition metal dichalcogenide (TX{sub 2}) structures. These patterns exhibit selective “splitting” or broadening of selected (00l) diffraction peaks, while other (00l) reflections remain relatively unaffected [Atkins et al., Chem. Mater. 24, 4594 (2012)]. Using a simplified optical model in the kinematic approximation, we illustrate that these peculiar and somewhat counterintuitive diffraction features can be understood in terms of additional layers of one of the intergrowth components, MX or TX{sub 2}, interleaved between otherwise “ideal” regions of MX-TX{sub 2} intergrowth. The interpretation is in agreement with scanning transmission electron microscope imaging, which reveals the presence of such stacking “defects” in films prepared from non-ideal precursors. In principle, the effect can be employed as a simple, non-destructive laboratory probe to detect and characterize ultrathin layers of one material, e.g., 2-dimensional crystals, embedded between two slabs of a second material, effectively using the two slabs as a highly sensitive interferometer of their separation distance.

Authors:
;  [1]; ; ; ;  [2]
  1. Department of Natural Sciences, Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, Oregon 97601 (United States)
  2. Department of Chemistry, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22410192
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 117; Journal Issue: 18; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; APPROXIMATIONS; CHALCOGENIDES; CRYSTALS; LAYERS; NANOSTRUCTURES; OPTICAL MODELS; PROBES; REFLECTION; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; THIN FILMS; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; TWO-DIMENSIONAL SYSTEMS; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Beekman, Matt, E-mail: matt.beekman@oit.edu, Rodriguez, Gabriel, Atkins, Ryan, Kunert, James, Moore, Daniel B., and Johnson, David C., E-mail: davej@uoregon.edu. Detection of nanoscale embedded layers using laboratory specular X-ray diffraction. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4920928.
Beekman, Matt, E-mail: matt.beekman@oit.edu, Rodriguez, Gabriel, Atkins, Ryan, Kunert, James, Moore, Daniel B., & Johnson, David C., E-mail: davej@uoregon.edu. Detection of nanoscale embedded layers using laboratory specular X-ray diffraction. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4920928.
Beekman, Matt, E-mail: matt.beekman@oit.edu, Rodriguez, Gabriel, Atkins, Ryan, Kunert, James, Moore, Daniel B., and Johnson, David C., E-mail: davej@uoregon.edu. Thu . "Detection of nanoscale embedded layers using laboratory specular X-ray diffraction". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4920928.
@article{osti_22410192,
title = {Detection of nanoscale embedded layers using laboratory specular X-ray diffraction},
author = {Beekman, Matt, E-mail: matt.beekman@oit.edu and Rodriguez, Gabriel and Atkins, Ryan and Kunert, James and Moore, Daniel B. and Johnson, David C., E-mail: davej@uoregon.edu},
abstractNote = {Unusual specular X-ray diffraction patterns have been observed from certain thin film intergrowths of metal monochalcogenide (MX) and transition metal dichalcogenide (TX{sub 2}) structures. These patterns exhibit selective “splitting” or broadening of selected (00l) diffraction peaks, while other (00l) reflections remain relatively unaffected [Atkins et al., Chem. Mater. 24, 4594 (2012)]. Using a simplified optical model in the kinematic approximation, we illustrate that these peculiar and somewhat counterintuitive diffraction features can be understood in terms of additional layers of one of the intergrowth components, MX or TX{sub 2}, interleaved between otherwise “ideal” regions of MX-TX{sub 2} intergrowth. The interpretation is in agreement with scanning transmission electron microscope imaging, which reveals the presence of such stacking “defects” in films prepared from non-ideal precursors. In principle, the effect can be employed as a simple, non-destructive laboratory probe to detect and characterize ultrathin layers of one material, e.g., 2-dimensional crystals, embedded between two slabs of a second material, effectively using the two slabs as a highly sensitive interferometer of their separation distance.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4920928},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
issn = {0021-8979},
number = 18,
volume = 117,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {5}
}