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Title: Poster — Thur Eve — 01: The effect of the number of projections on MTF and CNR in Compton scatter tomography

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the dependence of the reconstructed image quality on the number of projections in multi-projection Compton scatter tomography (MPCST). The conventional relationship between the projection number used for reconstruction and reconstructed image quality pertained to CT does not necessarily apply to MPCST, which can produce images from a single projection if the detectors have sufficiently high energy and spatial resolution. Methods: The electron density image was obtained using filtered-backprojection of the scatter signal over circular arcs formed using Compton equation. The behavior of the reconstructed image quality as a function of the projection number was evaluated through analytical simulations and characterized by CNR and MTF. Results: The increase of the projection number improves the contrast with this dependence being a function of fluence. The number of projections required to approach the asymptotic maximum contrast decreases as the fluence increases. Increasing projection number increases the CNR but not spatial resolution. Conclusions: For MPCST using a 500eV energy resolution and a 2×2mm{sup 2} size detector, an adequate image quality can be obtained with a small number of projections provided the incident fluence is high enough. This is conceptually different from conventional CT where a minimum number of projections is requiredmore » to obtain an adequate image quality. While increasing projection number, even for the lowest dose value, the CNR increases even though the number of photons per projection decreases. The spatial resolution of the image is improved by increasing the sampling within a projection rather than by increasing the number of projections.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)
  2. (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22409517
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ELECTRON DENSITY; ENERGY RESOLUTION; RADIATION DOSES; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; TOMOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Chighvinadze, T, Pistorius, S, and CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB. Poster — Thur Eve — 01: The effect of the number of projections on MTF and CNR in Compton scatter tomography. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4894987.
Chighvinadze, T, Pistorius, S, & CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB. Poster — Thur Eve — 01: The effect of the number of projections on MTF and CNR in Compton scatter tomography. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4894987.
Chighvinadze, T, Pistorius, S, and CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB. Fri . "Poster — Thur Eve — 01: The effect of the number of projections on MTF and CNR in Compton scatter tomography". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4894987.
@article{osti_22409517,
title = {Poster — Thur Eve — 01: The effect of the number of projections on MTF and CNR in Compton scatter tomography},
author = {Chighvinadze, T and Pistorius, S and CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate the dependence of the reconstructed image quality on the number of projections in multi-projection Compton scatter tomography (MPCST). The conventional relationship between the projection number used for reconstruction and reconstructed image quality pertained to CT does not necessarily apply to MPCST, which can produce images from a single projection if the detectors have sufficiently high energy and spatial resolution. Methods: The electron density image was obtained using filtered-backprojection of the scatter signal over circular arcs formed using Compton equation. The behavior of the reconstructed image quality as a function of the projection number was evaluated through analytical simulations and characterized by CNR and MTF. Results: The increase of the projection number improves the contrast with this dependence being a function of fluence. The number of projections required to approach the asymptotic maximum contrast decreases as the fluence increases. Increasing projection number increases the CNR but not spatial resolution. Conclusions: For MPCST using a 500eV energy resolution and a 2×2mm{sup 2} size detector, an adequate image quality can be obtained with a small number of projections provided the incident fluence is high enough. This is conceptually different from conventional CT where a minimum number of projections is required to obtain an adequate image quality. While increasing projection number, even for the lowest dose value, the CNR increases even though the number of photons per projection decreases. The spatial resolution of the image is improved by increasing the sampling within a projection rather than by increasing the number of projections.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4894987},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 8,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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