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Title: Poster — Thur Eve — 42: Radiochromic film calibration for low-energy seed brachytherapy dose measurement

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of radiochromic film calibration procedures used in external beam radiotherapy when applied to I-125 brachytherapy sources delivering higher doses, and to determine any necessary modifications to achieve similar accuracy in absolute dose measurements. GafChromic EBT3 film was used to measure radiation doses upwards of 35 Gy from 6 MV, 75 kVp and (∼28 keV) I-125 photon sources. A custom phantom was used for the I-125 irradiations to obtain a larger film area with nearly constant dose to reduce the effects of film heterogeneities on the optical density (OD) measurements. RGB transmission images were obtained with an Epson 10000XL flatbed scanner, and calibration curves relating OD and dose using a rational function were determined for each colour channel and at each energy using a non-linear least square minimization method. Differences found between the 6 MV calibration curve and those for the lower energy sources are large enough that 6 MV beams should not be used to calibrate film for low-energy sources. However, differences between the 75 kVp and I-125 calibration curves were quite small; indicating that 75 kVp is a good choice. Compared with I-125 irradiation, this gives the advantages ofmore » lower type B uncertainties and markedly reduced irradiation time. To obtain high accuracy calibration for the dose range up to 35 Gy, two-segment piece-wise fitting was required. This yielded absolute dose measurement accuracy above 1 Gy of ∼2% for 75 kVp and ∼5% for I-125 seed exposures.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)
  2. (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22407664
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ACCURACY; BRACHYTHERAPY; CALIBRATION; IODINE 125; OPACITY; PHANTOMS; RADIATION DOSES

Citation Formats

Morrison, H, Menon, G, Sloboda, R, and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3. Poster — Thur Eve — 42: Radiochromic film calibration for low-energy seed brachytherapy dose measurement. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4894902.
Morrison, H, Menon, G, Sloboda, R, & Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3. Poster — Thur Eve — 42: Radiochromic film calibration for low-energy seed brachytherapy dose measurement. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4894902.
Morrison, H, Menon, G, Sloboda, R, and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3. Fri . "Poster — Thur Eve — 42: Radiochromic film calibration for low-energy seed brachytherapy dose measurement". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4894902.
@article{osti_22407664,
title = {Poster — Thur Eve — 42: Radiochromic film calibration for low-energy seed brachytherapy dose measurement},
author = {Morrison, H and Menon, G and Sloboda, R and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of radiochromic film calibration procedures used in external beam radiotherapy when applied to I-125 brachytherapy sources delivering higher doses, and to determine any necessary modifications to achieve similar accuracy in absolute dose measurements. GafChromic EBT3 film was used to measure radiation doses upwards of 35 Gy from 6 MV, 75 kVp and (∼28 keV) I-125 photon sources. A custom phantom was used for the I-125 irradiations to obtain a larger film area with nearly constant dose to reduce the effects of film heterogeneities on the optical density (OD) measurements. RGB transmission images were obtained with an Epson 10000XL flatbed scanner, and calibration curves relating OD and dose using a rational function were determined for each colour channel and at each energy using a non-linear least square minimization method. Differences found between the 6 MV calibration curve and those for the lower energy sources are large enough that 6 MV beams should not be used to calibrate film for low-energy sources. However, differences between the 75 kVp and I-125 calibration curves were quite small; indicating that 75 kVp is a good choice. Compared with I-125 irradiation, this gives the advantages of lower type B uncertainties and markedly reduced irradiation time. To obtain high accuracy calibration for the dose range up to 35 Gy, two-segment piece-wise fitting was required. This yielded absolute dose measurement accuracy above 1 Gy of ∼2% for 75 kVp and ∼5% for I-125 seed exposures.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4894902},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 8,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
  • Purpose: Radiochromic film dosimetry is typically performed for high energy photons and moderate doses characterizing external beam radiotherapy (XRT). The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of previously established film calibration procedures used in XRT when applied to low-energy, seed-based brachytherapy at higher doses, and to determine necessary modifications to achieve similar accuracy in absolute dose measurements. Methods: Gafchromic EBT3 film was used to measure radiation doses upwards of 35 Gy from 75 kVp, 200 kVp, 6 MV, and (∼28 keV) I-125 photon sources. For the latter irradiations a custom phantom was built to hold a singlemore » I-125 seed. Film pieces were scanned with an Epson 10000XL flatbed scanner and the resulting 48-bit RGB TIFF images were analyzed using both FilmQA Pro software andMATLAB. Calibration curves relating dose and optical density via a rational functional form for all three color channels at each irradiation energy were determined with and without the inclusion of uncertainties in the measured optical densities and dose values. The accuracy of calibration curve variations obtained using piecewise fitting, a reduced film measurement area for I-125 irradiation, and a reduced number of dose levels was also investigated. The energy dependence of the film lot used was also analyzed by calculating normalized optical density values. Results: Slight differences were found in the resulting calibration curves for the various fitting methods used. The accuracy of the calibration curves was found to improve at low doses and worsen at high doses when including uncertainties in optical densities and doses, which may better represent the variability that could be seen in film optical density measurements. When exposing the films to doses > 8 Gy, two-segment piecewise fitting was found to be necessary to achieve similar accuracies in absolute dose measurements as when using smaller dose ranges. When reducing the film measurement area for the I-125 irradiations, the accuracy of the calibration curve was degraded due to the presence of localized film heterogeneities. No degradation in the calibration curves was found when reducing the number of calibration points down to only 4, but with piecewise fitting, 6 calibration points as well as a blank film are required. Variations due to photon energy in film optical density of up to 3% were found above doses of 2 Gy. Conclusions: A modified procedure for performing EBT3 film calibration was established for use with low-energy brachytherapy seeds and high dose exposures. The energy dependence between 6 MV and I-125 photons is significant such that film calibrations should be done with an appropriately low-energy source when performing low-energy brachytherapy dose measurements. Two-segment piecewise fitting with the inclusion of errors in measured optical density as well as dose was found to result in the most accurate calibration curves. Above doses of 1 Gy, absolute dose measurements can be made with an accuracy of 1.6% for 6 MV beams and 5.7% for I-125 seed exposures if using the I-125 source for calibration, or 2.3% if using the 75 kVp photon beam for calibration.« less
  • The purpose of the study was evaluating accuracy and reproducibility of a radiochromic film-based protocol to measure computer tomography dose index (CTDI) as a part of annual QA on CT scanners and kV-CBCT systems attached to linear accelerators. Energy dependence of Gafchromic XR-QA2 ® film model was tested over imaging beam qualities (50 – 140 kVp). Film pieces were irradiated in air to known values of air-kerma (up to 10 cGy). Calibration curves for each beam quality were created (Film reflectance change Vs. Air-kerma in air). Film responses for same air-kerma values were compared. Film strips were placed into holesmore » of a CTDI phantom and irradiated for several clinical scanning protocols. Film reflectance change was converted into dose to water and used to calculate CTDIvol values. Measured and tabulated CTDIvol values were compared. Average variations of ±5.2% in the mean film reflectance change were observed in the energy range of 80 to 140 keV, and 11.1% between 50 and 140 keV. Measured CTDI values were in average 10% lower than tabulated CTDI values for CT-simulators, and 44% higher for CBCT systems. Results presented a mean variation for the same machine and protocol of 2.6%. Variation of film response is within ±5% resulting in ±15% systematic error in dose estimation if a single calibration curve is used. Relatively large discrepancy between measured and tabulated CTDI values strongly support the trend towards replacing CTDI value with equilibrium dose measurement in the center of cylindrical phantom, as suggested by TG- 111.« less
  • High dose rate (HDR) remote afterloading brachytherapy involves sending a small, high-activity radioactive source attached to a cable to different positions within a hollow applicator implanted in the patient. It is critical that the source position within the applicator and the dwell time of the source are accurate. Daily quality assurance (QA) tests of the positional and dwell time accuracy are essential to ensure that the accuracy of the remote afterloader is not compromised prior to patient treatment. Our centre has developed an automated, video-based QA system for HDR brachytherapy that is dramatically superior to existing diode or film QAmore » solutions in terms of cost, objectivity, positional accuracy, with additional functionalities such as being able to determine source dwell time and transit time of the source. In our system, a video is taken of the brachytherapy source as it is sent out through a position check ruler, with the source visible through a clear window. Using a proprietary image analysis algorithm, the source position is determined with respect to time as it moves to different positions along the check ruler. The total material cost of the video-based system was under $20, consisting of a commercial webcam and adjustable stand. The accuracy of the position measurement is ±0.2 mm, and the time resolution is 30 msec. Additionally, our system is capable of robustly verifying the source transit time and velocity (a test required by the AAPM and CPQR recommendations), which is currently difficult to perform accurately.« less
  • The purpose of this work is twofold: 1) to measure dose profiles under lead shielding at the level of the lens for a range of clinical electron energies via film dosimetry; and, 2) to assess the validity of the Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) in calculating the penumbral doses under lead shielding with the heterogeneous electron algorithm. First, a film calibration curve that spanned the electron energies of interest, 6–18MeV, was created. Next, EBT3 film and lead shielding were incorporated into a solid water phantom with the film positioned 7mm below the lead and a variable thickness of bolus onmore » top. This geometry was reproduced in the Pinnacle TPS and used to calculate dose profiles using the heterogeneous electron algorithm. The measured vs. calculated dose profiles were normalized to d{sub max} in a homogeneous phantom with no lead shielding and compared. Pinnacle consistently overestimated the dose distal to the lead shielding with significant discrepancies occurring near the edge of the lead shield reaching 25% at the edge and 35% in the open field region. The film measurements showed that a minimum lead margin of 5mm extending beyond the diameter of the lens is required to adequately shield the lens to ≤10% of the dose at d{sub max}. These measurements allow for a reasonable estimate of the dose to the lens from anterior electron beams. They also allow for clinicians to assess the extent of the lead margin required to reduce the lens dose to an acceptable amount prior to radiotherapy treatment.« less
  • The interplay effect between the tumor motion and the radiation beam modulation during a VMAT treatment delivery alters the delivered dose distribution from the planned one. This work present and validate a method to accurately calculate the dose distribution in 4D taking into account the tumor motion, the field modulation and the treatment starting phase. A QUASAR™ respiratory motion phantom was 4D scanned with motion amplitude of 3 cm and with a 3 second period. A static scan was also acquired with the lung insert and the tumor contained in it centered. A VMAT plan with a 6XFFF beam wasmore » created on the averaged CT and delivered on a Varian TrueBeam and the trajectory log file was saved. From the trajectory log file 10 VMAT plans (one for each breathing phase) and a developer mode XML file were created. For the 10 VMAT plans, the tumor motion was modeled by moving the isocentre on the static scan, the plans were re-calculated and summed in the treatment planning system. In the developer mode, the tumor motion was simulated by moving the couch dynamically during the treatment. Gafchromic films were placed in the QUASAR phantom static and irradiated using the developer mode. Different treatment starting phase were investigated (no phase shift, maximum inhalation and maximum exhalation). Calculated and measured isodose lines and profiles are in very good agreement. For each starting phase, the dose distribution exhibit significant differences but are accurately calculated with the methodology presented in this work.« less