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Title: Poster — Thur Eve — 22: A water calorimeter for low-energy particle beams

Abstract

In this work, the feasibility of absolute dose to water measurements in low-energy electron beams using a water calorimeter specifically developed for shallow measurements is established. The calorimeter design consists of a cylindrical glass vessel encased in a block of expanded polystyrene. The vessel has a front window thickness of 1.1 mm, a 4 cm radius, and is 2.5 cm in depth. The vessel-block assembly sits inside a thermally-insulated box and is air-cooled to an operating temperature of 4 °C. Radiation-induced thermal gradients were simulated in a geometric model of the calorimeter using a finite element analysis software package. 52 absorbed dose to water measurements were performed in a 6 and 8 MeV electron beam (z{sub max} of 1.32 and 1.76 cm, respectively) for 60 seconds at a repetition rate of 400 MU/min and an SSD of 120 cm. Within the vessel, the depth of measurement was set to 1.08 cm relative to the inner front window. The average measured dose to water was 59.6 ± 0.2 cGy/100 MU (6 MeV), and 63.7 ± 0.3 cGy/100 MU (8 MeV). The associated heat transfer corrections were determined to be 1.026 ± 0.003 and 1.017 ± 0.004 for the 6 and 8more » MeV beams, respectively. The most significant source of uncertainty in this study was the repeatability (type A, 0.42%). It is expected that performing fewer consecutive measurements under higher dose rate conditions will improve the stability of the thermal background, thereby improving the repeatability and reducing the overall standard uncertainty.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Medical Physics Unit, McGill University (Canada)
  2. Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy Department, Université catholique de Louvain (Belgium)
  3. (Belgium)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22407645
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: (c) 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ABSORBED RADIATION DOSES; CALORIMETERS; CYLINDRICAL CONFIGURATION; ELECTRON BEAMS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; HEAT TRANSFER; MEV RANGE 01-10; POLYSTYRENE; TEMPERATURE GRADIENTS

Citation Formats

Renaud, J, Sarfehnia, A, Seuntjens, J, Rossomme, S, Vynckier, S, and Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Université catholique de Louvain. Poster — Thur Eve — 22: A water calorimeter for low-energy particle beams. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4894878.
Renaud, J, Sarfehnia, A, Seuntjens, J, Rossomme, S, Vynckier, S, & Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Université catholique de Louvain. Poster — Thur Eve — 22: A water calorimeter for low-energy particle beams. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4894878.
Renaud, J, Sarfehnia, A, Seuntjens, J, Rossomme, S, Vynckier, S, and Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Université catholique de Louvain. Fri . "Poster — Thur Eve — 22: A water calorimeter for low-energy particle beams". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4894878.
@article{osti_22407645,
title = {Poster — Thur Eve — 22: A water calorimeter for low-energy particle beams},
author = {Renaud, J and Sarfehnia, A and Seuntjens, J and Rossomme, S and Vynckier, S and Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Université catholique de Louvain},
abstractNote = {In this work, the feasibility of absolute dose to water measurements in low-energy electron beams using a water calorimeter specifically developed for shallow measurements is established. The calorimeter design consists of a cylindrical glass vessel encased in a block of expanded polystyrene. The vessel has a front window thickness of 1.1 mm, a 4 cm radius, and is 2.5 cm in depth. The vessel-block assembly sits inside a thermally-insulated box and is air-cooled to an operating temperature of 4 °C. Radiation-induced thermal gradients were simulated in a geometric model of the calorimeter using a finite element analysis software package. 52 absorbed dose to water measurements were performed in a 6 and 8 MeV electron beam (z{sub max} of 1.32 and 1.76 cm, respectively) for 60 seconds at a repetition rate of 400 MU/min and an SSD of 120 cm. Within the vessel, the depth of measurement was set to 1.08 cm relative to the inner front window. The average measured dose to water was 59.6 ± 0.2 cGy/100 MU (6 MeV), and 63.7 ± 0.3 cGy/100 MU (8 MeV). The associated heat transfer corrections were determined to be 1.026 ± 0.003 and 1.017 ± 0.004 for the 6 and 8 MeV beams, respectively. The most significant source of uncertainty in this study was the repeatability (type A, 0.42%). It is expected that performing fewer consecutive measurements under higher dose rate conditions will improve the stability of the thermal background, thereby improving the repeatability and reducing the overall standard uncertainty.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4894878},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 8,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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