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Title: Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?

Abstract

Correct target positioning is crucial for accurate dose delivery in breast radiotherapy resulting in utilisation of daily imaging. However, the radiation dose from daily imaging is associated with increased probability of secondary induced cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify doses associated with three imaging modalities and investigate the correlation of dose and varying breast size in breast radiotherapy. Planning computed tomography (CT) data sets of 30 breast cancer patients were utilised to simulate the dose received by various organs from a megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT), megavoltage electronic portal image (MV-EPI) and megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). The mean dose to organs adjacent to the target volume (contralateral breast, lungs, spinal cord and heart) were analysed. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between imaging dose and primary breast volume and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of induced secondary cancer was calculated for the contralateral breast. The highest contralateral breast mean dose was from the MV-CBCT (1.79 Gy), followed by MV-EPI (0.22 Gy) and MV-CT (0.11 Gy). A similar trend was found for all organs at risk (OAR) analysed. The primary breast volume inversely correlated with the contralateral breast dose for all three imaging modalities. Asmore » the primary breast volume increases, the likelihood of a patient developing a radiation-induced secondary cancer to the contralateral breast decreases. MV-CBCT showed a stronger relationship between breast size and LAR of developing a radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in comparison with the MV-CT and MV-EPI. For breast patients, imaging dose to OAR depends on imaging modality and treated breast size. When considering the use of imaging during breast radiotherapy, the patient's breast size and contralateral breast dose should be taken into account.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre and Ingham Institute, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia)
  2. (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22402363
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences (Print); Journal Volume: 62; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: PMCID: PMC4364804; PMID: 26229665; OAI: oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:4364804; Copyright (c) 2015 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Australian Institute of Radiography and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.; This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
Australia
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CONES; HAZARDS; IMAGES; LUNGS; MAMMARY GLANDS; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PLANNING; POSITIONING; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SPINAL CORD

Citation Formats

Batumalai, Vikneswary, E-mail: vikneswary.batumalai@sswahs.nsw.gov.au, South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Quinn, Alexandra, Jameson, Michael, Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Delaney, Geoff, South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales, School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, Holloway, Lois, South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, and School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales. Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?. Australia: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1002/JMRS.91.
Batumalai, Vikneswary, E-mail: vikneswary.batumalai@sswahs.nsw.gov.au, South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Quinn, Alexandra, Jameson, Michael, Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Delaney, Geoff, South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales, School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, Holloway, Lois, South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, & School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales. Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?. Australia. doi:10.1002/JMRS.91.
Batumalai, Vikneswary, E-mail: vikneswary.batumalai@sswahs.nsw.gov.au, South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Quinn, Alexandra, Jameson, Michael, Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Delaney, Geoff, South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales, School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, Holloway, Lois, South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, and School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales. Sun . "Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?". Australia. doi:10.1002/JMRS.91.
@article{osti_22402363,
title = {Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?},
author = {Batumalai, Vikneswary, E-mail: vikneswary.batumalai@sswahs.nsw.gov.au and South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales and Quinn, Alexandra and Jameson, Michael and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales and Delaney, Geoff and South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales and Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales and School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales and Holloway, Lois and South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales and School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales},
abstractNote = {Correct target positioning is crucial for accurate dose delivery in breast radiotherapy resulting in utilisation of daily imaging. However, the radiation dose from daily imaging is associated with increased probability of secondary induced cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify doses associated with three imaging modalities and investigate the correlation of dose and varying breast size in breast radiotherapy. Planning computed tomography (CT) data sets of 30 breast cancer patients were utilised to simulate the dose received by various organs from a megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT), megavoltage electronic portal image (MV-EPI) and megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). The mean dose to organs adjacent to the target volume (contralateral breast, lungs, spinal cord and heart) were analysed. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between imaging dose and primary breast volume and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of induced secondary cancer was calculated for the contralateral breast. The highest contralateral breast mean dose was from the MV-CBCT (1.79 Gy), followed by MV-EPI (0.22 Gy) and MV-CT (0.11 Gy). A similar trend was found for all organs at risk (OAR) analysed. The primary breast volume inversely correlated with the contralateral breast dose for all three imaging modalities. As the primary breast volume increases, the likelihood of a patient developing a radiation-induced secondary cancer to the contralateral breast decreases. MV-CBCT showed a stronger relationship between breast size and LAR of developing a radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in comparison with the MV-CT and MV-EPI. For breast patients, imaging dose to OAR depends on imaging modality and treated breast size. When considering the use of imaging during breast radiotherapy, the patient's breast size and contralateral breast dose should be taken into account.},
doi = {10.1002/JMRS.91},
journal = {Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences (Print)},
number = 1,
volume = 62,
place = {Australia},
year = {Sun Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Sun Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}