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Title: Dexterous acoustic trapping and patterning of particles assisted by phononic crystal plate

Abstract

In this letter, we present experimental demonstration of multi-particles trapping and patterning by the artificially engineered acoustic field of phononic crystal plate. Polystyrene particles are precisely trapped and patterned in two dimensional arrays, for example, the square, triangular, or quasi-periodic arrays, depending on the structures of the phononic crystal plates with varying sub-wavelength holes array. Analysis shows that the enhanced acoustic radiation force, induced by the resonant transmission field highly localized near the sub-wavelength apertures, accounts for the particles self-organizing. It can be envisaged that this kind of simple design of phononic crystal plates would pave an alternative route for self-assembly of particles and may be utilized in the lab-on-a-chip devices.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)
  2. (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22398939
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 16; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CRYSTALS; HOLES; PARTICLES; PERIODICITY; PHONONS; PLATES; POLYSTYRENE; TRAPPING; TWO-DIMENSIONAL SYSTEMS; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Wang, Tian, Ke, Manzhu, E-mail: mzke@whu.edu.cn, Xu, Shengjun, Feng, Junheng, Qiu, Chunyin, Liu, Zhengyou, and Institute for Advanced Studies, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072. Dexterous acoustic trapping and patterning of particles assisted by phononic crystal plate. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4918999.
Wang, Tian, Ke, Manzhu, E-mail: mzke@whu.edu.cn, Xu, Shengjun, Feng, Junheng, Qiu, Chunyin, Liu, Zhengyou, & Institute for Advanced Studies, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072. Dexterous acoustic trapping and patterning of particles assisted by phononic crystal plate. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4918999.
Wang, Tian, Ke, Manzhu, E-mail: mzke@whu.edu.cn, Xu, Shengjun, Feng, Junheng, Qiu, Chunyin, Liu, Zhengyou, and Institute for Advanced Studies, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072. Mon . "Dexterous acoustic trapping and patterning of particles assisted by phononic crystal plate". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4918999.
@article{osti_22398939,
title = {Dexterous acoustic trapping and patterning of particles assisted by phononic crystal plate},
author = {Wang, Tian and Ke, Manzhu, E-mail: mzke@whu.edu.cn and Xu, Shengjun and Feng, Junheng and Qiu, Chunyin and Liu, Zhengyou and Institute for Advanced Studies, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072},
abstractNote = {In this letter, we present experimental demonstration of multi-particles trapping and patterning by the artificially engineered acoustic field of phononic crystal plate. Polystyrene particles are precisely trapped and patterned in two dimensional arrays, for example, the square, triangular, or quasi-periodic arrays, depending on the structures of the phononic crystal plates with varying sub-wavelength holes array. Analysis shows that the enhanced acoustic radiation force, induced by the resonant transmission field highly localized near the sub-wavelength apertures, accounts for the particles self-organizing. It can be envisaged that this kind of simple design of phononic crystal plates would pave an alternative route for self-assembly of particles and may be utilized in the lab-on-a-chip devices.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4918999},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 16,
volume = 106,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 20 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Apr 20 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
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