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Title: Volumetric cutaneous microangiography of human skin in vivo by VCSEL swept-source optical coherence tomography

Abstract

We demonstrate volumetric cutaneous microangiography of the human skin in vivo that utilises 1.3-μm high-speed sweptsource optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). The swept source is based on a micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS)-tunable vertical cavity surface emission laser (VCSEL) that is advantageous in terms of long coherence length over 50 mm and 100 nm spectral bandwidth, which enables the visualisation of microstructures within a few mm from the skin surface. We show that the skin microvasculature can be delineated in 3D SS-OCT images using ultrahigh-sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) with a correlation mapping mask, providing a contrast enhanced blood perfusion map with capillary flow sensitivity. 3D microangiograms of a healthy human finger are shown with distinct cutaneous vessel architectures from different dermal layers and even within hypodermis. These findings suggest that the OCT microangiography could be a beneficial biomedical assay to assess cutaneous vascular functions in clinic. (laser biophotonics)

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. University of Washington, Department of Bioengineering, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22395823
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Quantum Electronics (Woodbury, N.Y.); Journal Volume: 44; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; CAPILLARY FLOW; COHERENCE LENGTH; LASERS; MEMS; MICROSTRUCTURE; SKIN; TOMOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Woo June Choi, and Wang, R K. Volumetric cutaneous microangiography of human skin in vivo by VCSEL swept-source optical coherence tomography. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1070/QE2014V044N08ABEH015542.
Woo June Choi, & Wang, R K. Volumetric cutaneous microangiography of human skin in vivo by VCSEL swept-source optical coherence tomography. United States. doi:10.1070/QE2014V044N08ABEH015542.
Woo June Choi, and Wang, R K. Sun . "Volumetric cutaneous microangiography of human skin in vivo by VCSEL swept-source optical coherence tomography". United States. doi:10.1070/QE2014V044N08ABEH015542.
@article{osti_22395823,
title = {Volumetric cutaneous microangiography of human skin in vivo by VCSEL swept-source optical coherence tomography},
author = {Woo June Choi and Wang, R K},
abstractNote = {We demonstrate volumetric cutaneous microangiography of the human skin in vivo that utilises 1.3-μm high-speed sweptsource optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). The swept source is based on a micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS)-tunable vertical cavity surface emission laser (VCSEL) that is advantageous in terms of long coherence length over 50 mm and 100 nm spectral bandwidth, which enables the visualisation of microstructures within a few mm from the skin surface. We show that the skin microvasculature can be delineated in 3D SS-OCT images using ultrahigh-sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) with a correlation mapping mask, providing a contrast enhanced blood perfusion map with capillary flow sensitivity. 3D microangiograms of a healthy human finger are shown with distinct cutaneous vessel architectures from different dermal layers and even within hypodermis. These findings suggest that the OCT microangiography could be a beneficial biomedical assay to assess cutaneous vascular functions in clinic. (laser biophotonics)},
doi = {10.1070/QE2014V044N08ABEH015542},
journal = {Quantum Electronics (Woodbury, N.Y.)},
number = 8,
volume = 44,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Aug 31 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Sun Aug 31 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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