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Title: Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

Abstract

Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, Veer Narmad South Gujarat University, Surat 395 007, Gujarat (India)
  2. Department of Applied Physics, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat 395 007, Gujarat (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22391767
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1661; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: ICCMP 2014: International Conference on Condensed Matter Physics 2014, Shimla (India), 4-6 Nov 2014; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CALCULATION METHODS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CORRECTIONS; DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS; LIQUIDS; POTENTIALS; RARE EARTHS; SHEAR; VISCOSITY

Citation Formats

Patel, H. P., E-mail: patel.harshal2@gmail.com, Thakor, P. B., E-mail: pbthakore@rediffmail.com, Prajapati, A. V., E-mail: anand0prajapati@gmail.com, and Sonvane, Y. A., E-mail: yas@ashd.svnit.ac.in. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4915457.
Patel, H. P., E-mail: patel.harshal2@gmail.com, Thakor, P. B., E-mail: pbthakore@rediffmail.com, Prajapati, A. V., E-mail: anand0prajapati@gmail.com, & Sonvane, Y. A., E-mail: yas@ashd.svnit.ac.in. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4915457.
Patel, H. P., E-mail: patel.harshal2@gmail.com, Thakor, P. B., E-mail: pbthakore@rediffmail.com, Prajapati, A. V., E-mail: anand0prajapati@gmail.com, and Sonvane, Y. A., E-mail: yas@ashd.svnit.ac.in. 2015. "Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4915457.
@article{osti_22391767,
title = {Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides},
author = {Patel, H. P., E-mail: patel.harshal2@gmail.com and Thakor, P. B., E-mail: pbthakore@rediffmail.com and Prajapati, A. V., E-mail: anand0prajapati@gmail.com and Sonvane, Y. A., E-mail: yas@ashd.svnit.ac.in},
abstractNote = {Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4915457},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1661,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 5
}
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