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Title: High-frequency combination coding-based steady-state visual evoked potential for brain computer interface

Abstract

This study presents a new steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) paradigm for brain computer interface (BCI) systems. The goal of this study is to increase the number of targets using fewer stimulation high frequencies, with diminishing subject’s fatigue and reducing the risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures. The new paradigm is High-Frequency Combination Coding-Based High-Frequency Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (HFCC-SSVEP).Firstly, we studied SSVEP high frequency(beyond 25 Hz)response of SSVEP, whose paradigm is presented on the LED. The SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of high frequency(beyond 40 Hz) response is very low, which is been unable to be distinguished through the traditional analysis method; Secondly we investigated the HFCC-SSVEP response (beyond 25 Hz) for 3 frequencies (25Hz, 33.33Hz, and 40Hz), HFCC-SSVEP produces n{sup n} with n high stimulation frequencies through Frequence Combination Code. Further, Animproved Hilbert-huang transform (IHHT)-based variable frequency EEG feature extraction method and a local spectrum extreme target identification algorithmare adopted to extract time-frequency feature of the proposed HFCC-SSVEP response.Linear predictions and fixed sifting (iterating) 10 time is used to overcome the shortage of end effect and stopping criterion,generalized zero-crossing (GZC) is used to compute the instantaneous frequency of the proposed SSVEP respondent signals, the improved HHT-based feature extraction method for the proposedmore » SSVEP paradigm in this study increases recognition efficiency, so as to improve ITR and to increase the stability of the BCI system. what is more, SSVEPs evoked by high-frequency stimuli (beyond 25Hz) minimally diminish subject’s fatigue and prevent safety hazards linked to photo-induced epileptic seizures, So as to ensure the system efficiency and undamaging.This study tests three subjects in order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)
  2. (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22391182
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1648; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: ICNAAM-2014: International Conference on Numerical Analysis and Applied Mathematics 2014, Rhodes (Greece), 22-28 Sep 2014; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BRAIN; COMPUTERS; EFFICIENCY; FATIGUE; POTENTIALS; SIGNALS; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO; SPECTRA; STABILITY; STEADY-STATE CONDITIONS; STIMULATION; STIMULI

Citation Formats

Zhang, Feng, Zhang, Xin, Xie, Jun, Li, Yeping, Han, Chengcheng, Lili, Li, Wang, Jing, Xu, Guang-Hua, and State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710054. High-frequency combination coding-based steady-state visual evoked potential for brain computer interface. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4913191.
Zhang, Feng, Zhang, Xin, Xie, Jun, Li, Yeping, Han, Chengcheng, Lili, Li, Wang, Jing, Xu, Guang-Hua, & State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710054. High-frequency combination coding-based steady-state visual evoked potential for brain computer interface. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4913191.
Zhang, Feng, Zhang, Xin, Xie, Jun, Li, Yeping, Han, Chengcheng, Lili, Li, Wang, Jing, Xu, Guang-Hua, and State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710054. Tue . "High-frequency combination coding-based steady-state visual evoked potential for brain computer interface". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4913191.
@article{osti_22391182,
title = {High-frequency combination coding-based steady-state visual evoked potential for brain computer interface},
author = {Zhang, Feng and Zhang, Xin and Xie, Jun and Li, Yeping and Han, Chengcheng and Lili, Li and Wang, Jing and Xu, Guang-Hua and State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710054},
abstractNote = {This study presents a new steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) paradigm for brain computer interface (BCI) systems. The goal of this study is to increase the number of targets using fewer stimulation high frequencies, with diminishing subject’s fatigue and reducing the risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures. The new paradigm is High-Frequency Combination Coding-Based High-Frequency Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (HFCC-SSVEP).Firstly, we studied SSVEP high frequency(beyond 25 Hz)response of SSVEP, whose paradigm is presented on the LED. The SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of high frequency(beyond 40 Hz) response is very low, which is been unable to be distinguished through the traditional analysis method; Secondly we investigated the HFCC-SSVEP response (beyond 25 Hz) for 3 frequencies (25Hz, 33.33Hz, and 40Hz), HFCC-SSVEP produces n{sup n} with n high stimulation frequencies through Frequence Combination Code. Further, Animproved Hilbert-huang transform (IHHT)-based variable frequency EEG feature extraction method and a local spectrum extreme target identification algorithmare adopted to extract time-frequency feature of the proposed HFCC-SSVEP response.Linear predictions and fixed sifting (iterating) 10 time is used to overcome the shortage of end effect and stopping criterion,generalized zero-crossing (GZC) is used to compute the instantaneous frequency of the proposed SSVEP respondent signals, the improved HHT-based feature extraction method for the proposed SSVEP paradigm in this study increases recognition efficiency, so as to improve ITR and to increase the stability of the BCI system. what is more, SSVEPs evoked by high-frequency stimuli (beyond 25Hz) minimally diminish subject’s fatigue and prevent safety hazards linked to photo-induced epileptic seizures, So as to ensure the system efficiency and undamaging.This study tests three subjects in order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4913191},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1648,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 10 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Tue Mar 10 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Steady-state visual evoked potentials (VEP's) were recorded from four cynomolgus monkeys in response to a sinusoidally oscillating 10 degrees helium-neon laser speckle field (632.8 nm), moving vertically 2.5 degrees at 8 shifts per second. A 5-pulse flash train at the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) dose from a collimated Q-switched frequency-doubled neodymium laser (532 nm) was superimposed on the foveal stimulus and the subsequent disruption and recovery of the VEP measured. Minimal disruption of the response signal magnitude was demonstrated (0.1 greater than p greater than 0.05) which recovered within 300 ms of the termination of the pulse train. A smallmore » but significant (p less than 0.01) disruption of phase entrainment was also noted that recovered within the same period. This is contrasted with a second experiment with three monkeys in which an argon (514 nm) laser served both as the speckle stimulus source and as the shuttered flash. Exposure to collimated MPE argon radiation for 250 ms immediately depressed the VEP (97%, p less than 0.01) and showed recovery to 70% of the pre-flash baseline only after 3 s. Phase lock was also severely degraded for several seconds. These results imply that visual processing of nonacuity-limited medium contrast stimuli with broad spatial frequency content will probably not be materially affected by ultra-short pulsed laser exposure at these energy levels and frequencies. However, even safe levels of collimated continuous laser light may have severe effects on vision that could parallel flash effects seen with Xenon discharge flash lamps.« less
  • Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations weremore » given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.« less