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Title: Review methods for image segmentation from computed tomography images

Abstract

Image segmentation is a challenging process in order to get the accuracy of segmentation, automation and robustness especially in medical images. There exist many segmentation methods that can be implemented to medical images but not all methods are suitable. For the medical purposes, the aims of image segmentation are to study the anatomical structure, identify the region of interest, measure tissue volume to measure growth of tumor and help in treatment planning prior to radiation therapy. In this paper, we present a review method for segmentation purposes using Computed Tomography (CT) images. CT images has their own characteristics that affect the ability to visualize anatomic structures and pathologic features such as blurring of the image and visual noise. The details about the methods, the goodness and the problem incurred in the methods will be defined and explained. It is necessary to know the suitable segmentation method in order to get accurate segmentation. This paper can be a guide to researcher to choose the suitable segmentation method especially in segmenting the images from CT scan.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Faculty of Science Computer and Mathematics, Universiti Teknologi Mara Malaysia, 40450 Shah Alam Selangor (Malaysia)
  2. Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia 43400 Serdang Selangor (Malaysia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22390747
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1635; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: ICOQSIA 2014: 3. International Conference on Quantitative Sciences and Its Applications, Langkawi, Kedah (Malaysia), 12-14 Aug 2014; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ACCURACY; ANIMAL TISSUES; AUTOMATION; CAT SCANNING; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGES; NEOPLASMS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Mamat, Nurwahidah, Rahman, Wan Eny Zarina Wan Abdul, Soh, Shaharuddin Cik, and Mahmud, Rozi. Review methods for image segmentation from computed tomography images. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4903576.
Mamat, Nurwahidah, Rahman, Wan Eny Zarina Wan Abdul, Soh, Shaharuddin Cik, & Mahmud, Rozi. Review methods for image segmentation from computed tomography images. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4903576.
Mamat, Nurwahidah, Rahman, Wan Eny Zarina Wan Abdul, Soh, Shaharuddin Cik, and Mahmud, Rozi. 2014. "Review methods for image segmentation from computed tomography images". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4903576.
@article{osti_22390747,
title = {Review methods for image segmentation from computed tomography images},
author = {Mamat, Nurwahidah and Rahman, Wan Eny Zarina Wan Abdul and Soh, Shaharuddin Cik and Mahmud, Rozi},
abstractNote = {Image segmentation is a challenging process in order to get the accuracy of segmentation, automation and robustness especially in medical images. There exist many segmentation methods that can be implemented to medical images but not all methods are suitable. For the medical purposes, the aims of image segmentation are to study the anatomical structure, identify the region of interest, measure tissue volume to measure growth of tumor and help in treatment planning prior to radiation therapy. In this paper, we present a review method for segmentation purposes using Computed Tomography (CT) images. CT images has their own characteristics that affect the ability to visualize anatomic structures and pathologic features such as blurring of the image and visual noise. The details about the methods, the goodness and the problem incurred in the methods will be defined and explained. It is necessary to know the suitable segmentation method in order to get accurate segmentation. This paper can be a guide to researcher to choose the suitable segmentation method especially in segmenting the images from CT scan.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4903576},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1635,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month =
}
  • Purpose: Auto-propagation of anatomic regions of interest from the planning computed tomography (CT) scan to the daily CT is an essential step in image-guided adaptive radiotherapy. The goal of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the algorithm in typical clinical applications. Methods and Materials: We had previously adopted an image intensity-based deformable registration algorithm to find the correspondence between two images. In the present study, the regions of interest delineated on the planning CT image were mapped onto daily CT or four-dimensional CT images using the same transformation. Postprocessing methods, such as boundary smoothing and modification, weremore » used to enhance the robustness of the algorithm. Auto-propagated contours for 8 head-and-neck cancer patients with a total of 100 repeat CT scans, 1 prostate patient with 24 repeat CT scans, and 9 lung cancer patients with a total of 90 four-dimensional CT images were evaluated against physician-drawn contours and physician-modified deformed contours using the volume overlap index and mean absolute surface-to-surface distance. Results: The deformed contours were reasonably well matched with the daily anatomy on the repeat CT images. The volume overlap index and mean absolute surface-to-surface distance was 83% and 1.3 mm, respectively, compared with the independently drawn contours. Better agreement (>97% and <0.4 mm) was achieved if the physician was only asked to correct the deformed contours. The algorithm was also robust in the presence of random noise in the image. Conclusion: The deformable algorithm might be an effective method to propagate the planning regions of interest to subsequent CT images of changed anatomy, although a final review by physicians is highly recommended.« less
  • Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effectivemore » edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy.« less
  • Purpose: A three-dimensional (3D) model of the teeth provides important information for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Tooth segmentation is an essential step in generating the 3D digital model from computed tomography (CT) images. The aim of this study is to develop an accurate and efficient tooth segmentation method from CT images. Methods: The 3D dental CT volumetric images are segmented slice by slice in a two-dimensional (2D) transverse plane. The 2D segmentation is composed of a manual initialization step and an automatic slice by slice segmentation step. In the manual initialization step, the user manually picks a starting slicemore » and selects a seed point for each tooth in this slice. In the automatic slice segmentation step, a developed hybrid level set model is applied to segment tooth contours from each slice. Tooth contour propagation strategy is employed to initialize the level set function automatically. Cone beam CT (CBCT) images of two subjects were used to tune the parameters. Images of 16 additional subjects were used to validate the performance of the method. Volume overlap metrics and surface distance metrics were adopted to assess the segmentation accuracy quantitatively. The volume overlap metrics were volume difference (VD, mm{sup 3}) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC, %). The surface distance metrics were average symmetric surface distance (ASSD, mm), RMS (root mean square) symmetric surface distance (RMSSSD, mm), and maximum symmetric surface distance (MSSD, mm). Computation time was recorded to assess the efficiency. The performance of the proposed method has been compared with two state-of-the-art methods. Results: For the tested CBCT images, the VD, DSC, ASSD, RMSSSD, and MSSD for the incisor were 38.16 ± 12.94 mm{sup 3}, 88.82 ± 2.14%, 0.29 ± 0.03 mm, 0.32 ± 0.08 mm, and 1.25 ± 0.58 mm, respectively; the VD, DSC, ASSD, RMSSSD, and MSSD for the canine were 49.12 ± 9.33 mm{sup 3}, 91.57 ± 0.82%, 0.27 ± 0.02 mm, 0.28 ± 0.03 mm, and 1.06 ± 0.40 mm, respectively; the VD, DSC, ASSD, RMSSSD, and MSSD for the premolar were 37.95 ± 10.13 mm{sup 3}, 92.45 ± 2.29%, 0.29 ± 0.06 mm, 0.33 ± 0.10 mm, and 1.28 ± 0.72 mm, respectively; the VD, DSC, ASSD, RMSSSD, and MSSD for the molar were 52.38 ± 17.27 mm{sup 3}, 94.12 ± 1.38%, 0.30 ± 0.08 mm, 0.35 ± 0.17 mm, and 1.52 ± 0.75 mm, respectively. The computation time of the proposed method for segmenting CBCT images of one subject was 7.25 ± 0.73 min. Compared with two other methods, the proposed method achieves significant improvement in terms of accuracy. Conclusions: The presented tooth segmentation method can be used to segment tooth contours from CT images accurately and efficiently.« less
  • Purpose: Develop an automated Random Forest algorithm for tissue segmentation of CT examinations. Methods: Seven materials were classified for segmentation: background, lung/internal gas, fat, muscle, solid organ parenchyma, blood/contrast, and bone using Matlab and the Trainable Weka Segmentation (TWS) plugin of FIJI. The following classifier feature filters of TWS were investigated: minimum, maximum, mean, and variance each evaluated over a pixel radius of 2n, (n = 0–4). Also noise reduction and edge preserving filters, Gaussian, bilateral, Kuwahara, and anisotropic diffusion, were evaluated. The algorithm used 200 trees with 2 features per node. A training data set was established using anmore » anonymized patient’s (male, 20 yr, 72 kg) chest-abdomen-pelvis CT examination. To establish segmentation ground truth, the training data were manually segmented using Eclipse planning software, and an intra-observer reproducibility test was conducted. Six additional patient data sets were segmented based on classifier data generated from the training data. Accuracy of segmentation was determined by calculating the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between manual and auto segmented images. Results: The optimized autosegmentation algorithm resulted in 16 features calculated using maximum, mean, variance, and Gaussian blur filters with kernel radii of 1, 2, and 4 pixels, in addition to the original CT number, and Kuwahara filter (linear kernel of 19 pixels). Ground truth had a DSC of 0.94 (range: 0.90–0.99) for adult and 0.92 (range: 0.85–0.99) for pediatric data sets across all seven segmentation classes. The automated algorithm produced segmentation with an average DSC of 0.85 ± 0.04 (range: 0.81–1.00) for the adult patients, and 0.86 ± 0.03 (range: 0.80–0.99) for the pediatric patients. Conclusion: The TWS Random Forest auto-segmentation algorithm was optimized for CT environment, and able to segment seven material classes over a range of body habitus and CT protocol parameters with an average DSC of 0.86 ± 0.04 (range: 0.80–0.99).« less
  • Purpose: To determine a threshold of vertebral body (VB) osteolytic or osteoblastic tumor involvement that would predict vertebral compression fracture (VCF) risk after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), using volumetric image-segmentation software. Methods and Materials: A computational semiautomated skeletal metastasis segmentation process refined in our laboratory was applied to the pretreatment planning CT scan of 100 vertebral segments in 55 patients treated with spine SBRT. Each VB was segmented and the percentage of lytic and/or blastic disease by volume determined. Results: The cumulative incidence of VCF at 3 and 12 months was 14.1% and 17.3%, respectively. The median follow-up was 7.3 months (range,more » 0.6-67.6 months). In all, 56% of segments were determined lytic, 23% blastic, and 21% mixed, according to clinical radiologic determination. Within these 3 clinical cohorts, the segmentation-determined mean percentages of lytic and blastic tumor were 8.9% and 6.0%, 0.2% and 26.9%, and 3.4% and 15.8% by volume, respectively. On the basis of the entire cohort (n=100), a significant association was observed for the osteolytic percentage measures and the occurrence of VCF (P<.001) but not for the osteoblastic measures. The most significant lytic disease threshold was observed at ≥11.6% (odds ratio 37.4, 95% confidence interval 9.4-148.9). On multivariable analysis, ≥11.6% lytic disease (P<.001), baseline VCF (P<.001), and SBRT with ≥20 Gy per fraction (P=.014) were predictive. Conclusions: Pretreatment lytic VB disease volumetric measures, independent of the blastic component, predict for SBRT-induced VCF. Larger-scale trials evaluating our software are planned to validate the results.« less