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Title: High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL

Abstract

Gamma-ray spectroscopy is intensively used at GANIL to measure low lying states in exotic nuclei on the neutron-rich as well as on the neutron-deficient side of the nuclear chart. On the neutron deficient border, gamma-rays have been observed for the first time in {sup 92}Pd. The level scheme which could be established points to the role of isoscalar pairing. On the neutron rich side, the lifetime of excited states in nuclei around {sup 68}Ni have been been measured using the plunger technique. This allows us to study the evolution of collectivity in a broad range of nuclei. In 2014 GANIL will host the AGATA array for a campaign of at least 2 years. This array is based on the gamma-ray tracking technique, which allows an impressive gain in resolving power.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL),CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Boulevard H. Becquerel, F-14076, Caen (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22390459
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1625; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 36. Brazilian Workshop on Nuclear Physics, Sao Sebastiao, SP (Brazil), 1-5 Sep 2013; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; DIAGRAMS; EXCITED STATES; GAIN; GAMMA RADIATION; GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY; GANIL CYCLOTRON; LIFETIME; NEUTRONS; NICKEL 68; PALLADIUM 92; RESOLUTION

Citation Formats

France, G. de. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4901757.
France, G. de. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4901757.
France, G. de. 2014. "High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4901757.
@article{osti_22390459,
title = {High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL},
author = {France, G. de},
abstractNote = {Gamma-ray spectroscopy is intensively used at GANIL to measure low lying states in exotic nuclei on the neutron-rich as well as on the neutron-deficient side of the nuclear chart. On the neutron deficient border, gamma-rays have been observed for the first time in {sup 92}Pd. The level scheme which could be established points to the role of isoscalar pairing. On the neutron rich side, the lifetime of excited states in nuclei around {sup 68}Ni have been been measured using the plunger technique. This allows us to study the evolution of collectivity in a broad range of nuclei. In 2014 GANIL will host the AGATA array for a campaign of at least 2 years. This array is based on the gamma-ray tracking technique, which allows an impressive gain in resolving power.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4901757},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1625,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month =
}
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