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Title: In what sense a neutron star-black hole binary is the holy grail for testing gravity?

Abstract

Pulsars in binary systems have been very successful to test the validity of general relativity in the strong field regime [1-4]. So far, such binaries include neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) and neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) systems. It is commonly believed that a neutron star-black hole (NS-BH) binary will be much superior for this purpose. But in what sense is this true? Does it apply to all possible deviations?.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. International Centre for Theoretical Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bangalore 560012 (India)
  2. ICREA and Institute of Space Sciences, Barcelona 2a Planta E-08193 (Spain)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22373378
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal Volume: 2014; Journal Issue: 08; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BLACK HOLES; GENERAL RELATIVITY THEORY; GRAVITATION; NEUTRON STARS; PULSARS; TESTING; WHITE DWARF STARS

Citation Formats

Bagchi, Manjari, and Torres, Diego F., E-mail: manjari.bagchi@icts.res.in, E-mail: dtorres@ieec.uab.es. In what sense a neutron star-black hole binary is the holy grail for testing gravity?. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2014/08/055.
Bagchi, Manjari, & Torres, Diego F., E-mail: manjari.bagchi@icts.res.in, E-mail: dtorres@ieec.uab.es. In what sense a neutron star-black hole binary is the holy grail for testing gravity?. United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2014/08/055.
Bagchi, Manjari, and Torres, Diego F., E-mail: manjari.bagchi@icts.res.in, E-mail: dtorres@ieec.uab.es. Fri . "In what sense a neutron star-black hole binary is the holy grail for testing gravity?". United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2014/08/055.
@article{osti_22373378,
title = {In what sense a neutron star-black hole binary is the holy grail for testing gravity?},
author = {Bagchi, Manjari and Torres, Diego F., E-mail: manjari.bagchi@icts.res.in, E-mail: dtorres@ieec.uab.es},
abstractNote = {Pulsars in binary systems have been very successful to test the validity of general relativity in the strong field regime [1-4]. So far, such binaries include neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) and neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) systems. It is commonly believed that a neutron star-black hole (NS-BH) binary will be much superior for this purpose. But in what sense is this true? Does it apply to all possible deviations?.},
doi = {10.1088/1475-7516/2014/08/055},
journal = {Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics},
number = 08,
volume = 2014,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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