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Title: Scalable optical quantum computer

Abstract

A way of designing a scalable optical quantum computer based on the photon echo effect is proposed. Individual rare earth ions Pr{sup 3+}, regularly located in the lattice of the orthosilicate (Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) crystal, are suggested to be used as optical qubits. Operations with qubits are performed using coherent and incoherent laser pulses. The operation protocol includes both the method of measurement-based quantum computations and the technique of optical computations. Modern hybrid photon echo protocols, which provide a sufficient quantum efficiency when reading recorded states, are considered as most promising for quantum computations and communications. (quantum computer)

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Institute for Superconductivity and Solid-State Physics, Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22373324
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Quantum Electronics (Woodbury, N.Y.); Journal Volume: 44; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CRYSTALS; LASER RADIATION; LASERS; PHOTONS; PRASEODYMIUM IONS; QUANTUM COMPUTERS; QUANTUM EFFICIENCY; QUBITS; RARE EARTHS; YTTRIUM SILICATES

Citation Formats

Manykin, E A, and Mel'nichenko, E V. Scalable optical quantum computer. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1070/QE2014V044N12ABEH015524.
Manykin, E A, & Mel'nichenko, E V. Scalable optical quantum computer. United States. doi:10.1070/QE2014V044N12ABEH015524.
Manykin, E A, and Mel'nichenko, E V. 2014. "Scalable optical quantum computer". United States. doi:10.1070/QE2014V044N12ABEH015524.
@article{osti_22373324,
title = {Scalable optical quantum computer},
author = {Manykin, E A and Mel'nichenko, E V},
abstractNote = {A way of designing a scalable optical quantum computer based on the photon echo effect is proposed. Individual rare earth ions Pr{sup 3+}, regularly located in the lattice of the orthosilicate (Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) crystal, are suggested to be used as optical qubits. Operations with qubits are performed using coherent and incoherent laser pulses. The operation protocol includes both the method of measurement-based quantum computations and the technique of optical computations. Modern hybrid photon echo protocols, which provide a sufficient quantum efficiency when reading recorded states, are considered as most promising for quantum computations and communications. (quantum computer)},
doi = {10.1070/QE2014V044N12ABEH015524},
journal = {Quantum Electronics (Woodbury, N.Y.)},
number = 12,
volume = 44,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month =
}
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