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Title: Hubble space telescope grism spectroscopy of extreme starbursts across cosmic time: The role of dwarf galaxies in the star formation history of the universe

Abstract

Near infrared slitless spectroscopy with the Wide Field Camera 3, on board the Hubble Space Telescope, offers a unique opportunity to study low-mass galaxy populations at high redshift (z ∼ 1-2). While most high-z surveys are biased toward massive galaxies, we are able to select sources via their emission lines that have very faint continua. We investigate the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass (M{sub *}) relation for about 1000 emission line galaxies identified over a wide redshift range of 0.3 ≲ z ≲ 2.3. We use the Hα emission as an accurate SFR indicator and correct the broadband photometry for the strong nebular contribution to derive accurate stellar masses down to M{sub *} ∼10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}. We focus here on a subsample of galaxies that show extremely strong emission lines (EELGs) with rest-frame equivalent widths ranging from 200 to 1500 Å. This population consists of outliers to the normal SFR-M{sub *} sequence with much higher specific SFRs (>10 Gyr{sup –1}). While on-sequence galaxies follow continuous star formation processes, EELGs are thought to be caught during an extreme burst of star formation that can double their stellar mass in a period of less than 100 Myr. The contribution of themore » starburst population to the total star formation density appears to be larger than what has been reported for more massive galaxies in previous studies. In the complete mass range 8.2 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub ☉}) <10 and a SFR lower completeness limit of about 2 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1} (10 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) at z ∼ 1 (z ∼ 2), we find that starbursts having EW{sub rest}(Hα) > 300, 200, and 100 Å contribute up to ∼13%, 18%, and 34%, respectively, to the total SFR of emission-line-selected sample at z ∼ 1-2. The comparison with samples of massive galaxies shows an increase in the contribution of starbursts toward lower masses.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]; ;  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7]; ;  [8]; ;  [9];  [10];  [11];  [12];  [13]
  1. Laboratoire d'Astrophysique, EPFL, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland)
  2. Yonsei University Observatory, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)
  3. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  4. UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France)
  5. Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)
  6. Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)
  7. Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, OX13RH (United Kingdom)
  8. Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  9. Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)
  10. Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France)
  11. Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)
  12. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)
  13. Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22365728
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 789; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; COSMOLOGY; EMISSION; GALAXIES; MASS; PHOTOMETRY; RED SHIFT; SPACE; SPECTROSCOPY; STARS; STATISTICS; TELESCOPES; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Atek, Hakim, Kneib, Jean-Paul, Pacifici, Camilla, Malkan, Matthew, Ross, Nathaniel, Charlot, Stephane, Lehnert, Matthew, Lee, Janice, Bedregal, Alejandro, Bunker, Andrew J., Colbert, James W., Rafelski, Marc, Dressler, Alan, McCarthy, Patrick, Hathi, Nimish, Martin, Crystal L., Siana, Brian, and Teplitz, Harry I.. Hubble space telescope grism spectroscopy of extreme starbursts across cosmic time: The role of dwarf galaxies in the star formation history of the universe. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/96.
Atek, Hakim, Kneib, Jean-Paul, Pacifici, Camilla, Malkan, Matthew, Ross, Nathaniel, Charlot, Stephane, Lehnert, Matthew, Lee, Janice, Bedregal, Alejandro, Bunker, Andrew J., Colbert, James W., Rafelski, Marc, Dressler, Alan, McCarthy, Patrick, Hathi, Nimish, Martin, Crystal L., Siana, Brian, & Teplitz, Harry I.. Hubble space telescope grism spectroscopy of extreme starbursts across cosmic time: The role of dwarf galaxies in the star formation history of the universe. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/96.
Atek, Hakim, Kneib, Jean-Paul, Pacifici, Camilla, Malkan, Matthew, Ross, Nathaniel, Charlot, Stephane, Lehnert, Matthew, Lee, Janice, Bedregal, Alejandro, Bunker, Andrew J., Colbert, James W., Rafelski, Marc, Dressler, Alan, McCarthy, Patrick, Hathi, Nimish, Martin, Crystal L., Siana, Brian, and Teplitz, Harry I.. Thu . "Hubble space telescope grism spectroscopy of extreme starbursts across cosmic time: The role of dwarf galaxies in the star formation history of the universe". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/96.
@article{osti_22365728,
title = {Hubble space telescope grism spectroscopy of extreme starbursts across cosmic time: The role of dwarf galaxies in the star formation history of the universe},
author = {Atek, Hakim and Kneib, Jean-Paul and Pacifici, Camilla and Malkan, Matthew and Ross, Nathaniel and Charlot, Stephane and Lehnert, Matthew and Lee, Janice and Bedregal, Alejandro and Bunker, Andrew J. and Colbert, James W. and Rafelski, Marc and Dressler, Alan and McCarthy, Patrick and Hathi, Nimish and Martin, Crystal L. and Siana, Brian and Teplitz, Harry I.},
abstractNote = {Near infrared slitless spectroscopy with the Wide Field Camera 3, on board the Hubble Space Telescope, offers a unique opportunity to study low-mass galaxy populations at high redshift (z ∼ 1-2). While most high-z surveys are biased toward massive galaxies, we are able to select sources via their emission lines that have very faint continua. We investigate the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass (M{sub *}) relation for about 1000 emission line galaxies identified over a wide redshift range of 0.3 ≲ z ≲ 2.3. We use the Hα emission as an accurate SFR indicator and correct the broadband photometry for the strong nebular contribution to derive accurate stellar masses down to M{sub *} ∼10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}. We focus here on a subsample of galaxies that show extremely strong emission lines (EELGs) with rest-frame equivalent widths ranging from 200 to 1500 Å. This population consists of outliers to the normal SFR-M{sub *} sequence with much higher specific SFRs (>10 Gyr{sup –1}). While on-sequence galaxies follow continuous star formation processes, EELGs are thought to be caught during an extreme burst of star formation that can double their stellar mass in a period of less than 100 Myr. The contribution of the starburst population to the total star formation density appears to be larger than what has been reported for more massive galaxies in previous studies. In the complete mass range 8.2 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub ☉}) <10 and a SFR lower completeness limit of about 2 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1} (10 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) at z ∼ 1 (z ∼ 2), we find that starbursts having EW{sub rest}(Hα) > 300, 200, and 100 Å contribute up to ∼13%, 18%, and 34%, respectively, to the total SFR of emission-line-selected sample at z ∼ 1-2. The comparison with samples of massive galaxies shows an increase in the contribution of starbursts toward lower masses.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/96},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 789,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Thu Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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  • No abstract prepared.