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Title: Frequency-dependent damping in propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves

Abstract

Propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves are often observed in polar plumes and active region fan loops. The observed periodicities of these waves range from a few minutes to a few tens of minutes and their amplitudes were found to decay rapidly as they travel along the supporting structure. Previously, thermal conduction, compressive viscosity, radiation, density stratification, and area divergence were identified to be some of the causes for change in the slow wave amplitude. Our recent studies indicate that the observed damping in these waves is frequency-dependent. We used imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to study this dependence in detail and for the first time via observations we attempted to deduce a quantitative relation between the damping length and frequency of these oscillations. We developed a new analysis method to obtain this relation. The observed frequency dependence does not seem to agree with the current linear wave theory and it was found that the waves observed in the polar regions show a different dependence from those observed in the on-disk loop structures despite the similarity in their properties.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Indian Institute of Astrophysics, II Block, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India)
  2. Center for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22365696
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 789; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; AMPLITUDES; DATA ANALYSIS; DECAY; DENSITY; FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE; MAGNETIC FIELDS; OSCILLATIONS; PERIODICITY; SOUND WAVES; STRATIFICATION; SUN; THERMAL CONDUCTION

Citation Formats

Prasad, S. Krishna, Banerjee, D., and Van Doorsselaere, T., E-mail: krishna@iiap.res.in. Frequency-dependent damping in propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/118.
Prasad, S. Krishna, Banerjee, D., & Van Doorsselaere, T., E-mail: krishna@iiap.res.in. Frequency-dependent damping in propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/118.
Prasad, S. Krishna, Banerjee, D., and Van Doorsselaere, T., E-mail: krishna@iiap.res.in. Thu . "Frequency-dependent damping in propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/118.
@article{osti_22365696,
title = {Frequency-dependent damping in propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves},
author = {Prasad, S. Krishna and Banerjee, D. and Van Doorsselaere, T., E-mail: krishna@iiap.res.in},
abstractNote = {Propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves are often observed in polar plumes and active region fan loops. The observed periodicities of these waves range from a few minutes to a few tens of minutes and their amplitudes were found to decay rapidly as they travel along the supporting structure. Previously, thermal conduction, compressive viscosity, radiation, density stratification, and area divergence were identified to be some of the causes for change in the slow wave amplitude. Our recent studies indicate that the observed damping in these waves is frequency-dependent. We used imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to study this dependence in detail and for the first time via observations we attempted to deduce a quantitative relation between the damping length and frequency of these oscillations. We developed a new analysis method to obtain this relation. The observed frequency dependence does not seem to agree with the current linear wave theory and it was found that the waves observed in the polar regions show a different dependence from those observed in the on-disk loop structures despite the similarity in their properties.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/789/2/118},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 789,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Thu Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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